Meeting Industry Demands of the 21st-Century Vocal Athlete

By Wendy D. LeBorgne, PhD, CCC-SLP and Marci Rosenberg, MS, CCC-SLP

hy•brid sing•er- (n). Refers to the vocal athlete who is highly skilled performing in multiple vocal styles possessing a solid vocal technique that is responsive, adaptable, and agile in order to meet demands of current and ever-evolving vocal music industry genres.

Through our years of professional singing, training, and performance (resulting in an evolution to become voice pathologists and singing voice specialists), we have encountered a transition in the industry demands and injuries of the 21st-century vocal athlete. Today’s commercial music industry demands versatility of vocal athletes who are now expected to be skilled in multiple styles of singing. Not only are these singers asked to perform vocal gymnastics on an eight-show per week schedule, these vocal athletes must also possess excellent acting skills and strong dancing ability to be competitive. These demands on the voice, body, and psyche necessitate a physically, vocally, and mentally fit singer who is agile and adaptable. Continue reading

Alphabet Soup: The SLP, CP, and NDT

Fran Redstone, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, C/NDT
Editor of Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy: NDT/Traditional/Eclectic

Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy by Fran Redstone, PhD, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

Is it reasonable to expect a child with shallow breathing, open-mouth posture, and a tongue thrust, whose body is fixed in extension, to manipulate toys or interact with peers in a stimulating home or school environment? Of course the answer is “no.” It is an exercise in frustration for the child and in futility for the child’s unprepared speech-language pathologist (SLP). I know this because I’ve been there.

When I am asked why I, as a speech pathologist (SLP), should “handle” the child’s body, I am reminded of a second grade class observation I conducted recently of a child with spastic diplegia. This child was ambulatory and cognitively intact but was in a small class for children with language disorders. He was helped to function within the classroom with a one-to-one aide. The youngster began to demonstrate some negative behaviors stemming from the frustration of not being understood. This had resulted from a loss of stability, which led to poor trunk support, leading to poor oral control. I quietly asked the aide if I could intervene and adjusted the foot support and pelvic positioning. The child sat upright and communicated better immediately. Continue reading

2014 Awards and Honors

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2014 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and honorees and their faculty sponsors are acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting, taking place this year in Orlando, FL, April 10-12. Congratulations to Doreen Hansmann, the master’s level winner and to Meg Simione, the doctoral level winner.

Doreen Hansmann, Master’s level Research Award recipient

Doreen Hansmann, Master’s level Research Award recipient

Meg Simione, Doctoral level Research Award recipient

Meg Simione, Doctoral level Research Award recipient

Continue reading

Featured Article: An Unconventional Childhood by author Jerry Northern

Jerry_Northern

Jerry L. Northern, PhD
Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Otolaryngology (Audiology)
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Denver, Colorado USA

This is a personal story about an unconventional childhood.  Maybe “unusual” childhood is a better description.   It begins way back in 1942 when I was 2 years old and my parents were in the midst of an unpleasant divorce.  While my parents were engaged in drawn-out skirmishes over custody for my older brother and me, we were sent to live with my grandparents in Denver, Colorado.  The unusual part of the story is that my grandparents were totally deaf.  And I mean rock-stone deaf – no measureable hearing and no hearing aids in those early days.  The communication between them was solely by American Sign Language (ASL).   My brother and I arrived at their home to meet them for the first time and realized that we no means of talking with them. Continue reading

Featured Article: One New Year’s Resolution to Keep

One New Year’s resolution to keep – learn more about being an effective speech-language pathology assistant (SLPA) supervisor

by Plural author Jennifer Ostergren

If you are like me, as 2014 swings into full gear, you look to your newly inked New Year’s resolutions. One resolution on my list this year is to expand my knowledge and skills as an educator and supervisor of speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs). Those of you with similar aspirations know that serving as an SLPA supervisor can be highly rewarding, but also challenging, especially given a lack of resources and tools specific to SLPAs. This year, however, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) continues to expand its efforts in this area, with new programs, policies, and resources specific to SLPAs and their supervisors. In particular, ASHA’s new Practice Portal on the topic of SLPAs, located at http://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Professional-Issues/Speech-Language-Pathology-Assistants/, is an excellent source of current information and resources on this topic. The sections that follow also highlight several key resources from ASHA that may be of help as well. Continue reading

Guest Blog Post – What’s in a CEU?

by Mary Huston, MS, CCC-SLP

One of the fabulous things about the profession of speech-language pathology is that we are expected to constantly learn. There is always new research being discussed, new ideas to practice, new breakthroughs for therapy, and sadly, new paperwork requirements. Most state licensures require a certain amount of continuing education hours every year or two and ASHA requires a certain amount over three years. Thankfully, we can usually double-dip and count the same CEUs for both state licensure and ASHA. However, in today’s busy schedule of high caseloads and insane paperwork, no one has time to sit through yet another conference that doesn’t pertain to our work.

bored_meetingAfter discussions on social media, it has come to my attention that not everyone realizes there are alternatives to sitting in a conference room just to get the CEUs. Don’t misunderstand me – I’m all for conferences. There is a lot to be said about the camaraderie of sitting in a room of similar professionals. However, as wonderful as that camaraderie is, if the subject matter doesn’t pertain to your job, or interest you, is it truly time well-spent? Thankfully there are many alternative ways to gain professional development and continuing education credits. Thankfully there are many alternative ways to gain professional development and continuing education credits. Continue reading

Featured Article: The Challenge of Clinical Education in Speech-Language Pathology

By James M. Mancinelli, MS CCC-SLP and Evelyn Klein, PhD. CCC-SLP

This article provides an overview of important issues facing clinical training of graduate students today. In light of current training models, budget constraints, staffing shortages, and productivity demands, it is time to take a hard look at the requirements and demands set by our profession in the hopes of making needed changes

The 2005 and 2014 ASHA Standards require that the student enrolled in a Master’s degree program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) obtain 400 clinical hours “across the lifespan with varied disorders”: 375 hours in direct contact with the patient/client and 25 observation hours.  This is a broad guideline and superficially seems reasonable and achievable. After all, the requirement that the student obtain a specified number of contact hours in each of the disorders, with adults and children, in assessment and treatment have been removed. Unfortunately, the current service delivery contexts in which speech-language pathologists practice are all impacted by fiscal constraints, staffing shortages, and productivity requirements.  Although these three factors may not necessarily affect the quality of care, they are seriously impacting the ability to clinically train graduate students in CSD.  It is imperative that other models be developed for clinical education and training and that the discipline reviews the evidence that supports maintaining the status quo.  This is especially critical as some programs are being asked to admit more students into the graduate program, creating the need for even more external clinical practicum experiences. Continue reading

Tips for Assessing Bilingual Children As a Monolingual SLP – by Leisha Vogl

Hello Speech-Language Pathologists-

We are re-posting an article from ASHASphere on bilingual patients written by Leisha Vogl. We hope you find it insightful.

-Plural Team

 

Tips for Assessing Bilingual Children As a Monolingual SLP

by Leisha Vogl

 

There are an estimated 337 different languages used (spoken, written, and/or signed) in the United States. Even bilingual speech-language pathologists will encounter situations in which the client’s primary language is unknown.  There are standardized, evidence-based tests for the Spanish-English population. But what about Russian, Vietnamese, German and so on? What do you do?

Here are some key practices that can aid any SLP evaluating a child who speaks an unfamiliar language:

  • Conduct a family/caregiver interview, which can help minimize cultural and linguistic biases. Understanding how others in the family view the client’s communication gives insight into expectations and the possibility for deficits. Is the client able to meet these expectations? If not, why and how? Do they differ significantly from others in that communication circle?
  • Use an interpreter. Meet with the interpreter prior to any contact with the family to review the process, terminology, and what you want him or her to do. If possible, use someone outside the child’s family and circle of friends to reduce the possibility of bias. Interpreters can provide key information, such as, “It was very hard for me to understand him,” or, “He doesn’t use prepositions correctly.” Using such information, along with additional testing measures can help support or negate a true disorder.
  • Use highly pragmatic tests if formal/standardized testing is not available in the child’s primary language. These tests will help determine the client’s grasp of conversational language, which is the first building block to more complex language. The same is true in monolinguals—that the first language we learn is social in nature. We e acquire more complex understanding and use of language by building on social language. You cannot report standard scores when using standardized testing not normed for that language. You can use the information as qualitative data to support the rest of your findings. I personally like administering the Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS), now a second edition, for this population. It is relatively easy and quick to administer.
  • Employ Dynamic Assessment, which  involves pretest of a skill, an intervention to address that skill, and then a post-test to determine if there was progress. This method of assessment can be useful for evaluating multilingual individuals. If intense intervention is needed, this can indicate  impairment.Review the ASHA website for more information on Dynamic Assessment.

Things to be mindful of regarding typical bilingual language development include the following.

  • The silent period occurs when a client is first exposed to a new language. Typically this period ends between six months to a year. Some common misidentifications in this phase are Autism Spectrum Disorder, Selective Mutism, and language delay. It has also been noted that with a significant change in school, family situation and the like can trigger some children to revert to the silent period. This is why family and caregiver interviewing is so essential to diagnosing a language disorder.
  • Bilingual development is recognized in two stages. Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS), also known as “conversational language,” typically takes two to three years to acquire. Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), also known as “academic language,” takes five to seven years to develop. Some common misidentifications during these phrases are Language Disorder and Specific Learning Disability. Be careful that the years refer to a 12-month period of constant and consistent exposure. Our academic calendars are typically nine months, so it may take more academic years to acquire conversational and academic language.

Remember when evaluating any child that there is variety among the “same” cultures and languages.

What additional information do you, or would you, include in an evaluation?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Leisha Vogl, MS CCC-SLP, is the owner of Sensible Speech-Language Pathology, LLC, in Salem, Oregon. She’s worked in the field of speech-language pathology for about 7 years ranging from early intervention, school-age populations, and adults in an acute care setting. Leisha is proficient in Spanish and American Sign Language. You may follow Sensible Speech on Facebook or Twitter. Check out the website at www.sensiblespeech.com

Section from Jerger’s “Audiology in the USA” Makes its Online Debut

Hello Plural Community-

This week we are re-posting an article from the Hearing Health & Technology Matters blog regarding Plural author James Jerger. We hope you enjoy.

-Plural Team

Section from Jerger’s “Audiology in the USA” makes its online debut – By David H. Kirkwood, the editor of Hearing News Watch and editor-in-chief of Hearing Health & Technology Matters

James JergerNo one has done more to advance the field of audiology over the past half century than James Jerger. As a researcher, writer/editor, teacher, and founding president of the American Academy of Audiology, Dr. Jerger has played an out-sized role in shaping the history of audiology and in preparing the profession to meet the needs of the 21st century.

That’s why when our blog, Hearing Health & Technology Matters (HHTM), had the unprecedented opportunity to publish an extensive passage from Dr. Jerger’s book, Audiology in the USAonline we seized it. With the permission of the book’s publisher, Plural Publishing, Wayne Staab has posted a 10-page section on rehabilitation from the book on Wayne’s World, his blog at HHMT.

Jerger_AITUHere, Dr. Jerger presents a fascinating and fast-moving chronicle of hearing aids from the carbon granule devices of 1902 through today’s advanced digital instruments. The Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, also recounts the development of real-ear measurements, the discovery of the phenomenon of auditory deprivation, and the invention of outcome measures to determine patient benefit. Especially interesting are the portraits Dr. Jerger paints of some of the men and women who made important contributions to audiology.

As Wayne Staab states on his blog, HHTM is honored to have the privilege of being the first to publish a chapter from Audiology in the USA on the Internet. To read it, visit Wayne’s World.

HOLIDAY SALE!

We are offering 30% off list price PLUS free ground shipping now through December 24th on any title published before 2012- including Dr. Jerger’s Audiology in the USA. Just enter promotion code HOL1330 at checkout and select DEFAULT SHIPPING METHOD to apply your discount.

Plural Authors Receive 2013 ASHA Awards

Each year, for over 70 years the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has recognized and awarded many deserving individuals for their dedication and contributions to the professions of speech-language, pathology, audiology and speech and hearing science. We would like to congratulate and highlight our authors who were honored with awards this year’s ASHA convention in Chicago.

The highest honor ASHA bestows upon its members is the Honors of the Association. Individuals recognized at this level have, “enhanced or altered the course of the professions”. We are so proud to say that Plural’s own CEO and co-founder, Dr. Sadanand Singh was recognized at this level. This year several of our authors received the Honors of the Association for their pioneering work:

  • Dr. Maurice H. Miller, NYU Steinhardt, was recognized this year for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of audiology”. Dr. Miller is Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology and was voted Professor of the Year at NYU. He is the author of Hearing Disorder Handbook, a practical, concise and time-saving text that provides comprehensive, reliable and accurate descriptions of auditory and vestibular disorders, their frequency of occurrence, etiology, diagnosis, and management – all in a single resource.
  • Dr. Robert J. Shprintzen, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, was recognized for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Shprintzen is a found member of the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc. and is a professor and director of several programs at New York Upstate Medical University. He is the author of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, volumes I and II. This comprehensive two-volume set combines text and video demonstrating the clinical features, communication phenotype and the natural history of speech and language of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS).
  • Dr. Cynthia K. Thompson, Northwestern University, was recognized this year for her “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Thompson is a professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology. She is also an ASHA fellow and recipient of the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern. She is the author of Aphasia Rehabilitation, a unique text that specifically contrasts impairment- and consequences- focused treatment with the aim of providing clinicians with a level playing field that permits them to evaluate for themselves the relative contributions that each approach provides.

The ASHA Committee on Honors awards the Fellowship of the Association to individuals who have “made outstanding contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders”. This year many of our authors were bestowed this honor:

  • Dr. Maria Adelaida Restrepo, Arizona State University, was recognized for her teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Restrpo is an Associate Professor and director of the Bilingual Language and Literacy Laboratory at ASU. She is a certified member of ASHA and author of Improving the Vocabulary and Oral Language Skills of Bilingual Latino Preschoolers.
  • Dr. Ronald C. Scherer, Bowling Green State University, was recognized for his teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Scherer is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Bowling Green State University. He is the author of Speaking and Singing on Stage.
  • Dr. Rahul Shrivstav, Michigan State University, was recognized for his administrative service, research and publications and service to state associations. He is the chair of Michigan State University’s department of communicative sciences and disorders. He has served as an Associate Editor for many scientific journals and is one of our consulting editors.
  • Dr. Anne van Kleeck, University of Texas at Dallas, was recognized for her teaching, administrative service and research and publications. She is professor and Callier Research Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of Sharing Books and Stories to Promote Language and Literacy.
  • Dr. Barbara Derickson Weinrich, Miami University, was recognized for her clinical service, teaching and research and publications. She is a professor at Miami University and Research Associate for the Cincinnait Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She is the author of Vocal Hygiene as well as the forthcoming text, Pediatric Voice.
  • Dr. Edwin M.L. Yiu, University of Hong Kong, was recognized for his teaching, administrative service and research and publications. He is a professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, He is the founder of the Voice Research Laboratory and holds and Honorary Professorship at the University of Sydney. He is also the author of Handbook of Voice Assessments.

The Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in International Achievement recognizes “distinguished achievements and significant contributions in the areas of communication disorders revealing great international impact from their work”. This year Plural author, Dr. Brooke Hallowell, Ohio University, received this award. Dr. Hallowell is the president of the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is the author of two forthcoming Plural books.

The Certificate of Recognition for Special contributions in Multicultural Affairs recognizes “recent distinguished achievement and contributions by ASHA members in the area of multicultural professional education and research, and clinical service to multicultural population”. This year Plural author, Dr. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, California State University Sacramento, received this award. Dr. Rosberry-McKibbin is a professor of speech pathology and audiology and is an ASHA Fellow. She is the author of Increasing Language Skills of Students from Low-Income Backgrounds.

Plural author, Dr. Audrey L. Holland, University of Arizona, was awarded the 2013 Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award in honor of her “exemplary contributions to science and practice”. Dr. Holland is a core member of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasisa movement and Regents’ Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the University of Arizona. She is the co-author of Counseling in Communication Disorders, now in its second edition.

Every year the editors and associate editors of ASHA journals “select an article they feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact”. This year Plural author, Dr. Lorraine O. Ramig’s article “Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Parkinson Disease” published in volume 21 of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, was chosen to receive an Editors’ Award this year.

Congratulations to all the ASHA awardees and special thanks to the great work produced by our award-winning authors!