Plural books honored as Doody’s Core Titles for 2015

We are thrilled to announce that Doody’s has released its Core Titles in the Health Sciences for 2015 which includes 21 Plural books! Doody’s Core Titles in the Health Sciences 2015 is primarily for medical, nursing, and allied health librarians around the world who are charged with making the book buying decisions for their libraries within budget guidelines. A core title is a book or software title that represents essential knowledge needed by professionals or students in a given discipline and is highly recommended for the collection of a library that serves health sciences specialists.

Core Titles for 2015:

Effective Communication: A New Health Care Obligation

Beukelman Effective Communication Image

By: Sarah W. Blackstone, David R. Beukelman, and Kathryn M. Yorkston
Editors of the new Patient-Provider Communication: Roles for Speech-Language Pathologists and Other Health Care Professionals

Prior to his accident, Frank was a 26-year-old energetic, physically active young adult with a wide range of interests and a full social life. A C3–C4 cervical spine injury left him unable to move his limbs. When medically stabilized, he was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit, where he was ventilator dependent and in halo traction. He was unable to speak and his only intentional gesture was a gaze shift. The hospital communication team helped Frank establish a reliable yes/no response (looking up to indicate “yes” and down for “no”). They encouraged his nurses and family to offer other choices as well (“maybe” or “later” or “I don’t know”). A speech-language pathologist showed him a speech-generating device (SGD), but when initially asked if he wanted to use it to “talk,” he responded by looking down, “No.” Later that same day, the team demonstrated the SGD again, showing him how he could use it to control the TV and a fan. When asked if he would be willing to give it a try, he replied, “Yes!” by looking up. Within 24 hours, Frank was using a template on the SGD to call a nurse, ask for medication, control a fan, and turn the TV off and on, all with a simple serial scan method and a switch. Over time, he became an active participant in his recovery process, asking doctors questions and participating in decisions about his treatment plan.

Effective communication between patients and providers is a core component of patient-centered and value-based health care. According to the Joint Commission (2010, p.1), effective patient provider communication is the successful joint establishment of meaning in which patients and health care providers exchange information, enabling patients to participate actively in their care from admission through discharge, and ensuring that the responsibilities of both patients and providers are understood. To be truly effective, communication requires a two-way process (expressive and receptive) in which messages are negotiated until the information is correctly understood by both parties.

The medical encounters that occur across the continuum of health care are usually time constrained and many are stressful, high-stake interactions. When communication breakdowns occur, the impacts can be devastating for patients, family members, providers, and the health care system. Research shows that communication difficulties are among the major causes of sentinel events and can negatively affect patient outcomes, safety, and satisfaction, as well as result in increased readmission rates, length of stay, and additional health care costs. Because of the diversity of patients and families served in our health care systems, successful communication can be very difficult to achieve. In fact, many patients present with multiple communication vulnerabilities.

At age 4 years, 6 months, Guillermo was in the ICU, intubated and awake following a series of surgeries for tracheoesophageal reconstruction. Guillermo and his family were from Honduras and spoke Spanish only. Guillermo was most relaxed when his mother or eldest brother were sitting next to his bed and rubbing his arm. Although hospital policy supported his family remaining at bedside throughout the day and night, there were moments when they needed to step away for personal care, to attend team meetings along with a translator, or for other reasons. The speech-language pathologist provided Guillermo with a simple voice output aid (Ablenet Little Mack) with messages that included, “Where is my family,” recorded in both Spanish and English, so hospital staff could understand him. The speech-language pathologists also made a 20-target Go Talk+ device (Attainment Company) available to him. It featured 15 target photos of family members with messages such as, “I want mom,” “You’re my best friend, Frederico,” “I love you,” and “Hold my hand,” as well as some medical messages. All messages were recorded in both languages.

We define “communication vulnerability” as the diminished capacity of an individual to speak, hear, understand, read, remember, or write due to factors that are inherent to the individual (e.g., disabilities related to receptive and expressive language skills, hearing, vision, speech, cognition, and memory, as well as language spoken, lifestyle, belief system, and limited health literacy), or related to the context or situation (e.g., a noisy environment, being intubated in an intensive care unit after surgery, suffering injury while traveling in a foreign country, having cultural practices, lifestyles, or religious beliefs that are not understood or accepted by providers).

Eleven-year-old Joshua had a bone marrow transplant. He was acutely aware of his suppressed immune system and created and used several communication tools during the time he required the use of a Bi-PAP noninvasive ventilator. Using a simple voice output communication tool, Joshua insisted on having the following message available at all times: “If anything falls on the floor, use the Sani-wipe to clean it before you let it touch me. Also, if your gloves touch the floor when you pick it up, change your gloves before coming near me.”

In the book, Patient-Provider Communication: Roles for Speech-Language Pathologists and Other Health Care Professions, we describe how health care facilities and the providers who work within them can begin to assume a more active role in supporting patients who are communication vulnerable. Speech-language pathologists, nurses, administrators, and physicians are key to improving the “culture of communication” within their facilities, spearheading interprofessional practices that benefit all patients and ultimately providers and the facility’s bottom line. Currently, the role of communication intermediary is assumed by a few providers or family members with a personal commitment; although a rising number of health care organizations are beginning to specify policies and role assignments regarding the coordination of communication support services, communication facilitation for all patients with communication difficulties (not just those who are deaf or have second language issues), or a legal or medical intermediary designated to ensure that communication vulnerable patients accurately participate in legal and medical decisions.

Examples of promising practices and strategies across health care settings are highlighted in individual chapters that focus on doctor visits, emergency services, Intensive and acute care settings for children and adults, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, long-term residential care, and end-of-life care. In this book, we have invited authors who have considerable expertise in patient provider communication services across the range of health care settings to share information about the policies, intervention strategies, communication materials, and technologies that are being implemented within their medical settings to support the needs of communication vulnerable patients.

The wife of a person with ALS described his end-of-life experience: He was having a great deal of difficulty breathing and simply could not get comfortable in his hospital bed or wheelchair. We decided to go with in-hospital hospice since his pain management was not well controlled. In hospice, he regularly used his (eye gaze-accessible) SGD to tell us what he did and did not want. I am so grateful that he was able to use it extensively during the last few days of his life. I do not know what we would have done without it.

The authors recognize that there continues to be a considerable gap between clinical research evidence, what is mandated by health care policy, and what is experienced every day by patients, their families, and providers during medical encounters because of the ways in which many health care organizations currently deliver care. In other words, we recognize that implementation, or the process of putting effective patient-provider communication policies into practice, continues to be a challenge within many health care organizations; however, in the final chapter of Patient-Provider Communication we discuss a number of implementation strategies.

References
The Joint Commission. (2010). Advancing effective communication, cultural competence, and patient and family centered care: A roadmap for hospitals. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Author.

About the Authors
Sarah W. Blackstone, PhD, CCC-SLP, is president of Augmentative Communication, Inc. She has authored multiple texts in the augmentative and alternative communication field as well as articles in Augmentative Communication News and other publications. David R. Beukelman, PhD, CCC-SLP, is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has served as director of research and education for the Communication Disorders Division, Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Kathryn M. Yorkston, PhD, BC-ANCDS, is a professor of rehabilitation medicine and head of the speech pathology division within the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center.

2015 Plural Publishing Research Award Winners

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2015 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and the honorees and their faculty sponsors were acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting, which took place this year in Newport Beach, California, April 15-18.

“We received 82 complete applications for the Research Awards this year. The quality was very high in all of these applications, making for a lively review process. In the end, there was one each at the MS/AuD level and the PhD level that were truly outstanding,” according to Richard C. Folsom, who chaired the award committee this year.

Eric Bostwick, 2015 Research Award Winner

Eric Bostwick, 2015 Plural Research Award Winner

At the MS/AuD level, the award went to Eric Bostwick at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Eric is an AuD student working with Dr. Bob Lutfi and his research is entitled, “Decision Weights and Stimulus-Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions.”

Bridget Perry, 2015 Research Award Winner

Bridget Perry, 2015 Plural Research Award Winner

At the PhD level, the award went to Bridget Perry at the MGH Institute in Boston. Bridget is a PhD student working with Dr. Jordan Green and her research is entitled “Early Detection of Dysphagia in ALS.”

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Novice to Expert Clinician

By John McCarthy, PhD, CCC-SLP and Aimee Dietz, PhD, CCC-SLP

Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication by John McCarthy and Aimee Dietz

Understanding the personal story of an individual who uses augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can have a positive impact on the attitudes of people without disabilities toward that individual (McCarthy, Donofrio-Horwitz, & Smucker, 2010). Almost any AAC specialist has story after story of moments when they have helped reveal the true abilities of an individual through AAC:

• The eight-year-old boy with cerebral palsy who everyone assumed had below average intellectual ability and presymbolic language skills, was in fact bilingual.
• The forty-year-old woman with bulbar onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who cannot dress or feed herself, but still manages her finances, parents her children, and makes end-of-life decisions.
• The eighteen-year-old girl with autism spectrum disorder whose potential to contribute to society was doubted, yet planned for employment after high school and managed a new mobile device-based communication system.
• The fifty-two-year-old man with stroke-induced aphasia who medical staff assumed was “incompetent”; however, still made informed decisions about medical care and enjoyed friendly banter on the golf course with his adult sons.  Continue reading

Plural Sponsors Communication Sciences and Disorders Library in China

Angie Singh, Plural Publishing CEO and President, has donated a collection of voice and communication sciences and disorders books to the Jinan University in China in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh. Dr. Singh, founder of Plural Publishing, Inc. was an an esteemed international leader in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

Donation plaque

Plural’s donation is in recognition of the collaboration between Jinan University and Ohio University in promoting the field of communication sciences and disorders in China.

Plural's collection of communication sciences and disorders books at Jinan University Library in China (2014).

Plural’s collection of communication sciences and disorders books at Jinan University Library in China (2014).

Continue reading

Brand New Practical Resource for Voice Coaches

Body and Voice: Somatic Re-education by Marina Gilman

Body and Voice: Somatic Re-education by Marina Gilman

Body and Voice: Somatic Re-education by Marina Gilman, MM, MA, CCC-SLP, is an excellent resource for teachers of singing, voice coaches, and speech-language pathologists who work with singers and other voice professionals. It provides a new paradigm for working with singers in a way that allows for improved kinesthetic awareness needed to work with their body rather than against it. The text contains a series of lessons designed to train singing teachers, coaches, and voice therapists to recognize in their students the patterns of use and posture that interfere with respiration, phonation, and/or resonance. In addition, it provides tools for the teacher to guide the student to a level of self-awareness of habituated patterns along with strategies to implement change from the inside out. Continue reading

Invaluable Resources for Anyone Who Uses or Trains the Singing Voice

The Vocal Athlete

The Vocal Athlete by Wendy LeBorgne and Marci Rosenberg

The Vocal Athlete and the companion workbook The Vocal Athlete: Application and Technique for the Hybrid Singer are written and designed to bridge the gap between the art of contemporary commercial music (CCM) singing and the science behind voice production in this ever-growing popular vocal style. These books are a must have for the speech pathologist, singing voice specialist, and vocal pedagogue. Continue reading

Bollywood comes to San Diego to raise money for the ASHFoundation

Angie making dinner at ASHFoundation fundraiser

Angie making dinner at ASHFoundation fundraiser

This past Saturday, June 7th, Plural President and CEO Angie Singh hosted a “Bollywood”-themed fundraiser at her home in La Jolla, CA, with proceeds benefiting the ASHFoundation. Created in 1946 by a visionary leader in the field of communication sciences, Wendell Johnson, the ASHFoundation is a charitable organization that supports the advancement of knowledge in this field and seeks to improve the lives of people with speech, language, or hearing disorders. Continue reading

Alphabet Soup: The SLP, CP, and NDT

Fran Redstone, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, C/NDT
Editor of Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy: NDT/Traditional/Eclectic

Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy

Effective SLP Interventions for Children with Cerebral Palsy by Fran Redstone, PhD, CCC-SLP, C/NDT

Is it reasonable to expect a child with shallow breathing, open-mouth posture, and a tongue thrust, whose body is fixed in extension, to manipulate toys or interact with peers in a stimulating home or school environment? Of course the answer is “no.” It is an exercise in frustration for the child and in futility for the child’s unprepared speech-language pathologist (SLP). I know this because I’ve been there.

When I am asked why I, as a speech pathologist (SLP), should “handle” the child’s body, I am reminded of a second grade class observation I conducted recently of a child with spastic diplegia. This child was ambulatory and cognitively intact but was in a small class for children with language disorders. He was helped to function within the classroom with a one-to-one aide. The youngster began to demonstrate some negative behaviors stemming from the frustration of not being understood. This had resulted from a loss of stability, which led to poor trunk support, leading to poor oral control. I quietly asked the aide if I could intervene and adjusted the foot support and pelvic positioning. The child sat upright and communicated better immediately. Continue reading

Featured Article- Choral Pedagogy, Third Edition


CHORAL PEDAGOGY, 3RD edition

Brenda Smith, DMA and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA

Choral Pedagogy 3rd

Singing is known to every culture around the world.   For most of us, singing skill is learned collaboratively in choirs.  To participate in a choir throughout a lifetime, we must adjust our vocal expectations and maintain a dynamic sense of readiness for the changes that occur from year to year.  The choral conductor must work nimbly to accommodate the vocal needs of each age group, including all singers at all times in assignments appropriate to the contributions they are able to make.  There are many challenges, but choral pedagogy, voice science and medical resources are equipped to assist the choral conductor in the creation of a dynamic rehearsal and performance plan.

Lifelong Singing

For the training of vocal skill, trained and amateur singers of any age benefit from the personal attention of a voice builder or choral conductor.  Each voice presents with a specific complement of unique set of vocal, aural, rhythmic and interpretative gifts.  Because singers perceive their voices differently the way they are perceived by their listeners, singers at any age rely on constructive feedback generated by the trusted ears and eyes of a qualified person.

choirChanges in range are a natural part of the aging process and are due to the loss of muscle bulk and alterations in connective tissue in the vocal fold, as well as to respiratory changes, blood flow and alterations in body muscle nerve condition, and other alterations.  Another factor is the ossification of laryngeal cartilages.  The degree of aging changes varies from singer to singer.  People who love to sing wish to be included in choral activities as long as possible.  Choral singing can be particularly beneficial for the preservation of vocal skill and for delaying the inevitable losses of range, control and agility.

 

Medical Aspects

While choral conductors are not expected to have the medical knowledge of physicians, they should have sufficient familiarity with vocal health problems to recognize at least obvious voice dysfunction and suggest that afflicted singers seek medical attention.  Medical voice care has advanced markedly over the last few decades.  Voice is now an established subspecialty of otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat), and expert care for singers is available much more widely than it used to be.

Good medical diagnosis in all fields often depends on asking the right questions and then listening carefully to the answers. This process is known as “taking a history.” Recently, medical care for voice problems has utilized a markedly expanded, comprehensive history, recognizing that there is more to the voice than simply the vocal folds. Virtually any body system may be responsible for voice complaints. In fact, problems outside the larynx often cause voice dysfunction in people whose vocal folds appear fairly normal and who would have received no effective medical care a few years ago.

Physical examination of a patient with voice complaints involves a complete ear, nose, and throat assessment and examination of other body systems as appropriate. In the last few years, subjective examination has been supplemented by technological aids that improve the ability to “see” the vocal mechanism and allow quantification of aspects of its function. With phonation at middle C, the vocal folds come together and separate approximately 250 times per second. Strobovideolaryngoscopy uses a laryngeal microphone to trigger a stroboscope that illuminates the vocal folds, allowing the examiner to assess them in “slow motion”. This technology allows visualization of small masses, and other abnormalities that are simply missed in vocal folds that looked “normal” under continuous light. The instruments contained in a well-equipped clinical voice laboratory assess six categories of vocal function: vibratory, aerodynamic, phonatory, acoustic, electromyographic, and psychoacoustic. State-of-the-art analysis of vocal function is extremely helpful in the diagnosis, therapy, and evaluation of progress during the treatment of voice disorders.

Following a thorough history, physical examination, and clinical voice laboratory analysis, it is usually possible to arrive at an accurate explanation for voice dysfunction. Of course, treatment depends on the etiology (cause). Fortunately, as technology has improved voice medicine, the need for laryngeal surgery has diminished. When the underlying problem is corrected properly, the voice usually improves, but collaborative treatment by a team of specialists is most desirable to ensure general and vocal health and optimize voice function. The choir director should be part of that team.  Details of medical problems associated with voice disorders may be found in other literature. 1-4

The Basics of Singing

Warm ups and cools downs are necessary for any singer.  Warm up and cool down exercises adjust the vocal instrument from speech to singing and from singing back to speech.  Warm ups and cool downs involve four elements: relaxation, posture, breathing and resonance.  Relaxation before and after singing contributes to vocal health.  The vocal mechanism and the extremities need to be stretched and warmed.  Good posture, both standing and seated, must be established in order to achieve a full breath.  Conductors should be mindful that singing in a seated position is not an easy task.  All singers should maintain an erect posture that allows maximum muscular freedom, flexibility and safety.   A buoyant, flexible approach to breath support during exhalation follows.  The final step to vocal readiness involves uniting the breath with the vocal sound.  Exercises that evoke resonant sounds, such as humming, trilling with the lips or sighing set the stage for a focused vocal tone.  In the process of cool down, singers return the voice to the speaking range by sighing, chanting or humming through the mid and lower registers.

singer

The role singing plays in the daily life of each singer is diverse and unique.  The rhythm and discipline of music learning sharpens mental acumen and memory. For choir members who maintain interests in acting and public speaking, singing can be a means of maintaining vocal strength and stamina.  For many, singing in a choir makes life worth living.  The overall musical results of a choir rehearsal may be of less importance than the good experience of being together for the task of singing.  Singers want to continue singing as long as they can and as well as they can.  Choral pedagogy is advancing to accommodate the special needs of singers of all ages.  By establishing good singing habits, remaining physically fit, setting reasonable goals, and attending to vocal health, choral singers can “stay in the game” for many decades.

References

  1. Sataloff, R.TProfessional Voice: The Science and Art of Clinical Care, Third Edition.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2005.
  2. Rubin, J., Sataloff, R.T. and Korovin, G Diagnosis and Treatment of Voice Disorders, Fourth Edition.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2013, in press
  3. Heman-Ackah, Y.D., Sataloff, R.T. and Hawkshaw, M.J.  Protecting the Vocal Instrument.  Narberth, PA: Science and Medicine; 2013.
  4. Smith, B. and Sataloff, R.T.  Choral Pedagogy and the Older Singer.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2012.