Featured Article: One New Year’s Resolution to Keep

One New Year’s resolution to keep – learn more about being an effective speech-language pathology assistant (SLPA) supervisor

by Plural author Jennifer Ostergren

If you are like me, as 2014 swings into full gear, you look to your newly inked New Year’s resolutions. One resolution on my list this year is to expand my knowledge and skills as an educator and supervisor of speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs). Those of you with similar aspirations know that serving as an SLPA supervisor can be highly rewarding, but also challenging, especially given a lack of resources and tools specific to SLPAs. This year, however, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) continues to expand its efforts in this area, with new programs, policies, and resources specific to SLPAs and their supervisors. In particular, ASHA’s new Practice Portal on the topic of SLPAs, located at http://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Professional-Issues/Speech-Language-Pathology-Assistants/, is an excellent source of current information and resources on this topic. The sections that follow also highlight several key resources from ASHA that may be of help as well. Continue reading

Blogs by Plural Authors

Our authors are the best in the business. They are leaders in their given fields, winners of prestigious awards and constant innovators. Follow their latest news by visiting their blogs:

Hear the Music by Marshall Chasin

His blog Hear the Music focuses on all things related to hearing aids and music. What are some tricks that can be used to improve a hearing aid for music?, How can we prevent hearing loss from loud music?, etc.

Marshall Chasin, AuD,MSc, Reg. CASLPO, Aud(C) is an Audiologist and the Director of Auditory Research at the Musicians’ Clinics of Canada in Toronto, the Coordinator of Research at the Canadian Hearing Society, and the Director of Research at ListenUp Canada. Chasin has been involved with hearing and hearing aid assessment since 1981, and is the author of over 100 clinically based articles. He is the editor of Hearing Loss in Musicians: Prevention and Mangagement.

Chasin Blog Screenshot Continue reading

Section from Jerger’s “Audiology in the USA” Makes its Online Debut

Hello Plural Community-

This week we are re-posting an article from the Hearing Health & Technology Matters blog regarding Plural author James Jerger. We hope you enjoy.

-Plural Team

Section from Jerger’s “Audiology in the USA” makes its online debut – By David H. Kirkwood, the editor of Hearing News Watch and editor-in-chief of Hearing Health & Technology Matters

James JergerNo one has done more to advance the field of audiology over the past half century than James Jerger. As a researcher, writer/editor, teacher, and founding president of the American Academy of Audiology, Dr. Jerger has played an out-sized role in shaping the history of audiology and in preparing the profession to meet the needs of the 21st century.

That’s why when our blog, Hearing Health & Technology Matters (HHTM), had the unprecedented opportunity to publish an extensive passage from Dr. Jerger’s book, Audiology in the USAonline we seized it. With the permission of the book’s publisher, Plural Publishing, Wayne Staab has posted a 10-page section on rehabilitation from the book on Wayne’s World, his blog at HHMT.

Jerger_AITUHere, Dr. Jerger presents a fascinating and fast-moving chronicle of hearing aids from the carbon granule devices of 1902 through today’s advanced digital instruments. The Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, also recounts the development of real-ear measurements, the discovery of the phenomenon of auditory deprivation, and the invention of outcome measures to determine patient benefit. Especially interesting are the portraits Dr. Jerger paints of some of the men and women who made important contributions to audiology.

As Wayne Staab states on his blog, HHTM is honored to have the privilege of being the first to publish a chapter from Audiology in the USA on the Internet. To read it, visit Wayne’s World.

HOLIDAY SALE!

We are offering 30% off list price PLUS free ground shipping now through December 24th on any title published before 2012- including Dr. Jerger’s Audiology in the USA. Just enter promotion code HOL1330 at checkout and select DEFAULT SHIPPING METHOD to apply your discount.

Plural Authors Receive 2013 ASHA Awards

Each year, for over 70 years the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has recognized and awarded many deserving individuals for their dedication and contributions to the professions of speech-language, pathology, audiology and speech and hearing science. We would like to congratulate and highlight our authors who were honored with awards this year’s ASHA convention in Chicago.

The highest honor ASHA bestows upon its members is the Honors of the Association. Individuals recognized at this level have, “enhanced or altered the course of the professions”. We are so proud to say that Plural’s own CEO and co-founder, Dr. Sadanand Singh was recognized at this level. This year several of our authors received the Honors of the Association for their pioneering work:

  • Dr. Maurice H. Miller, NYU Steinhardt, was recognized this year for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of audiology”. Dr. Miller is Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology and was voted Professor of the Year at NYU. He is the author of Hearing Disorder Handbook, a practical, concise and time-saving text that provides comprehensive, reliable and accurate descriptions of auditory and vestibular disorders, their frequency of occurrence, etiology, diagnosis, and management – all in a single resource.
  • Dr. Robert J. Shprintzen, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, was recognized for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Shprintzen is a found member of the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc. and is a professor and director of several programs at New York Upstate Medical University. He is the author of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, volumes I and II. This comprehensive two-volume set combines text and video demonstrating the clinical features, communication phenotype and the natural history of speech and language of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS).
  • Dr. Cynthia K. Thompson, Northwestern University, was recognized this year for her “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Thompson is a professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology. She is also an ASHA fellow and recipient of the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern. She is the author of Aphasia Rehabilitation, a unique text that specifically contrasts impairment- and consequences- focused treatment with the aim of providing clinicians with a level playing field that permits them to evaluate for themselves the relative contributions that each approach provides.

The ASHA Committee on Honors awards the Fellowship of the Association to individuals who have “made outstanding contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders”. This year many of our authors were bestowed this honor:

  • Dr. Maria Adelaida Restrepo, Arizona State University, was recognized for her teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Restrpo is an Associate Professor and director of the Bilingual Language and Literacy Laboratory at ASU. She is a certified member of ASHA and author of Improving the Vocabulary and Oral Language Skills of Bilingual Latino Preschoolers.
  • Dr. Ronald C. Scherer, Bowling Green State University, was recognized for his teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Scherer is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Bowling Green State University. He is the author of Speaking and Singing on Stage.
  • Dr. Rahul Shrivstav, Michigan State University, was recognized for his administrative service, research and publications and service to state associations. He is the chair of Michigan State University’s department of communicative sciences and disorders. He has served as an Associate Editor for many scientific journals and is one of our consulting editors.
  • Dr. Anne van Kleeck, University of Texas at Dallas, was recognized for her teaching, administrative service and research and publications. She is professor and Callier Research Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of Sharing Books and Stories to Promote Language and Literacy.
  • Dr. Barbara Derickson Weinrich, Miami University, was recognized for her clinical service, teaching and research and publications. She is a professor at Miami University and Research Associate for the Cincinnait Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She is the author of Vocal Hygiene as well as the forthcoming text, Pediatric Voice.
  • Dr. Edwin M.L. Yiu, University of Hong Kong, was recognized for his teaching, administrative service and research and publications. He is a professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, He is the founder of the Voice Research Laboratory and holds and Honorary Professorship at the University of Sydney. He is also the author of Handbook of Voice Assessments.

The Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in International Achievement recognizes “distinguished achievements and significant contributions in the areas of communication disorders revealing great international impact from their work”. This year Plural author, Dr. Brooke Hallowell, Ohio University, received this award. Dr. Hallowell is the president of the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is the author of two forthcoming Plural books.

The Certificate of Recognition for Special contributions in Multicultural Affairs recognizes “recent distinguished achievement and contributions by ASHA members in the area of multicultural professional education and research, and clinical service to multicultural population”. This year Plural author, Dr. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, California State University Sacramento, received this award. Dr. Rosberry-McKibbin is a professor of speech pathology and audiology and is an ASHA Fellow. She is the author of Increasing Language Skills of Students from Low-Income Backgrounds.

Plural author, Dr. Audrey L. Holland, University of Arizona, was awarded the 2013 Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award in honor of her “exemplary contributions to science and practice”. Dr. Holland is a core member of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasisa movement and Regents’ Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the University of Arizona. She is the co-author of Counseling in Communication Disorders, now in its second edition.

Every year the editors and associate editors of ASHA journals “select an article they feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact”. This year Plural author, Dr. Lorraine O. Ramig’s article “Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Parkinson Disease” published in volume 21 of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, was chosen to receive an Editors’ Award this year.

Congratulations to all the ASHA awardees and special thanks to the great work produced by our award-winning authors!

Plural Authors- How to Make Your Book More Promotable

Hello Plural Authors,

This post is for you! Brian Feinblum, creator and author of BookMarketingBuzzBlog and Chief Marketing Officer for Media Connect, recently invited us to share one of his blog posts, Making Your Book More Promotable. We felt that much of it would be informative for you wherever you may be in the book-creation process and so condensed and edited it with you in mind.

We are always here to help you!

-Plural Team

Making Your Book More Promotable 

Write Your Next Book with The Media in Mind

bookThe world of book publishing has changed immensely over the past decade –and certainly over the past three years, thanks to Amazon, Apple, tablets, e-books, Borders, and social media.

The role of book publicity has not changed though the methods have been altered. PR is needed to give a book a chance at succeeding in an overcrowded marketplace and a noisy media landscape. With more books being published than ever before, and more media outlets, there is a lot of competition.

Technology has no doubt impacted many industries including publishing. As a result, readers and consumers have been changed as well. Writers are changing, too. They have become writers and promoters.

There is no way of getting around it. To embrace PR as an author is to embrace your future.  The good news is there is plenty that you can do to promote your book:

collaboration

  • Think like the media and about their needs
  • Change your attitude about your PR role
  • Brand beyond the book – brand yourself
  • Network
  • Partner with other authors

Lots of authors have hang-ups about publicity. They often feel that they aren’t “mainstream” enough to be promotable or are too shy and uncomfortable to promote their book. You need to take ownership of your book and that means quarterbacking your PR campaign.

Give yourself a “PR audit” to see where you can begin:

  1.  Think of the connections you have and the people you know – do you have connections who could “hook you up” or can you drop names to the media?
  2. What is in your book that the media will find interesting?

Next think seriously about what it is you want to accomplish through publicity. Do you want to build your career, establish a voice, sell your book, influence others, get a job out of it? Knowing what your end goal is from PR will help you decide how to go about getting there. Not knowing why you are doing publicity won’t get you anywhere positive. Always keep an eye towards the future. In deciding what your goal is, consider realistically how much time and energy you will actually have to dedicate towards promoting your book. This will help you determine what publicity goal is attainable and feasible given your busy life.

The most promotable books, of any genre, are:

  • Unique in how they tackle a well-known subject
  • Reveal news or raise great questions
  • Lend personal insight on an industry, person, or organization

What’s Today’s Media Landscape?

In today’s media landscape there are more outlets and opportunities, their value is also more diluted than ever before. You will need a certain quantity of quality media placements

PR is not just about giving away free downloads of chapters and books, or of tweeting and making videos, or of e-blasting a press release. It is about making a sustained, strategic effort to influence the influencers and get media coverage that will help you in the short and long-term.

pen&paperYour writing can help you get media coverage and how you talk about what you wrote matters. Are you an expert in the field? If so, sound like it. Find a way to summarize without the details. Get to the heart of why someone should read your book. You should formulate your 15-second elevator speech about your book before it is written. Express it in a way that serves a need, fulfills a desire or feeds a want.

If this sounds like a lot to take in, it is; but don’t worry. Planning and practice makes perfect. Here are some tricks that can help get media recognition:

  • Socialize or “regionalize” the book
  • Get early reviews & build “buzz”
  • Ask for specific favors from those you know
  • Exploit personal experience/standing
  • Use PR as a means to an end- remember your end goal
  • Coincide your media pitches and efforts with upcoming events, holidays, anniversaries, honorary days, and timely news hooks
  • Create a website at least 5-6 months prior to your book launch date
  • See your launch date as a coronation – not Day 1. From your launch date, you have 30-90 days to make an impression.

Green Apple on BooksRemember to focus on your goal and keep an eye on the future. Plan ahead and begin your PR campaign before the book publishes. The last thing you want is a huge stack of inventory with no one interested. Keep your audience excited by doing daily publicity- even if it is just a simple tweet. Always meet your deadlines so everything comes in on schedule with no unexpected surprises. Test your ideas out on other people to get feedback. If at first you don’t succeed, try again.

There is nothing more rewarding having written a great book than to have a lot of readers and media attention. By actively promoting your work you position yourself to break through the clutter and heard successfully.

Must-see TV – Audiology is a hot topic this week

Authors_in_the_News

Recently a few of our authors have been on television! They are experts in the field of audiology and we are happy to share their wisdom and success.

Ruth Bentler, PhD was on Charlie Rose’s Brain Series speaking about the brain and hearing. Specifically she detailed some of the history of the hearing aid and the future of hearing loss awareness and acceptance. Just want to see Ruth? Skip to the 20 minute mark.

Brian Taylor, AUD was interviewed on hearing health by Morgan Fairchild for the new show Baby Boomers in America on the LifeTime Network. He discusses the importance of early detection and maintained audiologic care.

Plural Author in the News: Blake Wilson Awarded Lasker Prize

Authors_in_the_NewsOn September 9th of this year, Plural author Dr. Blake Wilson was awarded the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medicine Research Award for his pioneering efforts in cochlear implantation, along with Graeme Clark and Ingeborg Hochmair. Dr. Wilson was chosen to receive the award because he, “oversaw a giant leap forward in speech encoding for implants that ingeniously manipulated the timing and place of stimulation so as to minimize distortion and channel interaction.” 1

Blake WilsonHe is the Co-Director for the Duke Hearing Center and an adjunct professor for the university. He also is Chief Strategy Advisor for MED-EL Medical Electronics GmbH of Innsbruck, Austria and a Senior Fellow Emeritus of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in the Research Triangle Park, NC. He has been involved in the development of the cochlear implant (CI) for the past three decades and is the inventor of many of the signal processing strategies used with the present-day devices. His book Better Hearing with Cochlear Implants: Studies at Research Triangle Institute describes his and Dr. Michael Dorman’s research in more depth.

Current cochlear implants still have limitations in delivering speech signals but are able to distinguish speech in loud noise areas, as well as identify a speaker’s gender. Dr. Wilson and the other awardees contributions to the field have given 300,000 implant recipients the gift of hearing.

1. O’Donoghue, G. Cochlear Implants — Science, Serendipity, and Success. The New England Journal of Medicine, Sept. 9, 2013, doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1310111

 

Feature Article: Toward a More Effective Collaboration

Toward a More Effective Collaboration by Aaron Fletcher, MD

2doctorsAs a discipline Otolaryngology has long recognized the benefits and virtues of a collaborative model of healthcare delivery. In fact, I believe that few other medical specialties collaborate as frequently and as effectively as Otolaryngologists—it is an integral part of our culture. On a daily basis, we are called to collaborate with specialists of diverse expertise (Audiologists, Speech and Language Pathologists, Neurosurgeons, Radiologists, Radiation Oncologist, Medical Oncologists and so on). In consulting these experts, we recognize the knowledge of these specialists as complimentary to our own and no less valuable. In fact, we frequently congregate in multi-disciplinary conferences where everyone has a say, and everyone’s opinion counts.

As our specialty embarks upon a changing healthcare landscape, we are constantly challenged to evolve our collaborative process in order to keep pace with the expanding application of technology across healthcare.This collaborative spirit is one of the major reasons that I enjoy this specialty. One of the things I appreciate most about Otolaryngology is the opportunity to learn the subtle nuances of a diagnostic finding, condition or technique that are afforded by colleagues and other members of the treatment team.  Throughout my very young career, I’ve found that better collaboration invariably leads to better care and that to be successful; collaboration requires shared vision, values, risks, resources, and rewards regardless of function, occupation or level of training. This is truly what collaborative care is all about.

communicationThe ubiquity of internet access via mobile devices and smartphones, along with the rise of social media has changed the way in which health care information is distributed and consumed. This factor has allowed patients ample access to information about their health conditions and associated treatment options. A recent Pew Internet research study found that one in three adults have turned to online sources to figure out a medical condition that they or someone else they know might have1. Combining these internet resources with expanded mobile network technology means that patients are increasingly capable of seeking answers to their healthcare questions instantaneously. This means that patients are now empowered to become more active participants in their care, and this is certainly a good thing.

On the other hand, these factors also exert pressure upon caregivers to keep pace with these changes in health related information consumption by increasing technological sophistication and improving their own access to medical knowledge. By doing so, we are better suited to meet the demands of a patient population that is better equipped to make important healthcare

As the application of technology across the healthcare landscape has led to a greater sense of empowerment among patients, advancements in health IT, (including electronic health records, cloud computing and health information exchange platforms), also hold great promise for clinicians. The advent of these tools has empowered clinicians to mobilize and share clinical information with members of the treatment team at any time and from any location with internet access. Given the intrinsic collaborative nature of our field, it makes perfect sense that we leverage these technologies to expand our approach to coordinating collaborative care. HIPPA compliant hosting and file sharing networks are now working to mitigate the risk of exchanging protected health information (PHI) via the web and mobile devices. These networks work to encrypt PHI both in storage and in-transit, thereby providing a layer of protection against breaches in security. While these platforms should be used with caution to ensure compliance with HIPPA regulations, as these tools continue to evolve, they will create new opportunities for collaboration and partnership across traditional institutional and geographic boundaries.

Naturally, I believe that Otolaryngologists should be at the forefront of integrating these tools into clinical practice, as we continue to seek new ways of perfecting collaborative care.  I believe ubiquitous data accessibility and sharing (cloud computing) coupled with HIPPA-compliant hosting platforms have the ability not only to facilitate, but to enhance the way we collaborate. Using these tools we can share best practices and treatment protocols, coordinate video conferences with colleagues outside our geographic area, and obtain outside expertise about challenging cases. These tools also allow us to interface with patients about their care, and to provide them a portal to share relevant updates on their condition from the comfort of their home. All of these efforts are critical to the long-term success of our collaborative efforts as a specialty, and familiarity with the tools by which we accomplish these aims is imperative.

So as we embark upon a continually evolving paradigm of healthcare consumption and delivery, we must continue in the spirit of collaboration, and seek out the new tools of our trade.  By doing so, we can continue to demonstrate that better collaboration leads to better care.

References:

1.            Fox, Susannah, Duggan, Maeve: Health Online 2013. Accessed online via http://  pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Health-online.aspx

 

Dr. Fletcher is the author of the just-published Comprehensive Otolaryngology Review: A Case-Based Approach Fletcher_COR