A Tribute to Plural Author Garyth Nair, MA

A TRIBUTE TO PLURAL AUTHOR GARYTH NAIR, MD

Garyth NairPlural has lost a dear friend and author. Dr. Garyth Nair passed away on August 10th, 2013 following a stroke. He was 69 years old and is survived by his wife Angelika Nair, a mezzo-soprano and his brother Ron Nair.

Dr. Nair began his vocal and conducting studies at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ where he was appointed Assistant Conductor of the famed Westminster Choir- the first student in the College’s history to be so honored. He later studied at Tanglewood with the late Sir Adrian Boult and completed an MA in Musicology at New York University. He was the former Conductor/Music Director of the Chamber Symphony of New Jersey and former Assistant Conductor of the New Jersey Symphony and the senior division of the Lakeland Youth Symphony.

At the time of his death, he was Professor of Music at Drew University in Madison, NJ where he conducted the Chorale, the Orchestra and was also Director of Vocal Activities. His love of music drove him to teach and research the human singing voice for over 25 years. In addition to his work at Drew University, Dr. Nair was also a well known conductor for one New Jersey’s premiere choruses, the Summit Chorale.

The Craft of Singing

Plural’s CEO and co-founder, Angie Singh says of Garyth Nair: “His manuscript was one
of the first we received at our home even before we decided to start a publishing company in 2004. He believed in us so much.” We were honored to call him part of our Plural family and have him among our roster of authors. Our most heartfelt condolences go out to his wife Angelika and brother Ron. He will be missed not only by his family and friends, but also by his colleagues and students.

Dr. Nair’s obituary published yesterday in the New York Times, as well as on The Voice Foundation’s website.  His funeral will be held tomorrow morning in his hometown of Chatman, NJ. Donations in his honor can be contributed to The Voice Foundation here.

Advice for Audiology Students from Plural Authors

graduationGraduation can be an exciting and yet terrifying time. What do you do now that you’ve graduated and completed all your hard studies? Many turn to advice from those who are more experienced to aid them in making a decision.

We were fortunate to sit down with several of our authors in the field of audiology at the AudiologyNOW! meeting this past April. We asked these seasoned experts what advice they would give to students or anyone starting out in the communication disorders professions. Their responses were heartfelt, candid, a little irreverent, but definitely reveal a deep love for their profession.

Some of their advice-

  • Consider going into private practice
  • Get an MBA/other higher degree
  • Be true to yourself; do what you want to do and do it well
  • Continue learning about the industry/technology
  • Communicate with patients better than your peers

We hope you enjoy!

The Voice Foundation 42nd Annual Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice

vflogoPlural will be exhibiting at this year’s symposium and displaying many of the books written by this year’s presenters. The following is our list of recommended sessions led or moderated by our esteemed authors:

Thursday, May 30th

10:30 am – 11:00 pm

AGING AND TISSUE CHANGES

The Westin Philadelphia Hotel: Grand Ballroom

10:30 am Vocal Training Mitigates the Effects of Age on Rat Vocalizations and Laryngeal Neuromuscular Junctions

  • Aaron M. Johnson, Michelle R. Ciucci, Nadine P. Connor

10:45 am Aging Induces Severe Metabolic and Contractile Dysfunction in the Rat Posterior Cricoarytenoid Muscle

11:00 am – 12:00 pm

SINGING AND PITCH-SHIFT REFLEX

  • Chair: Christy Ludlow

11:00 am Analyzing the Pitch-Shift-Reflex

  • Simon Petermann, Michael Döllinger, Lisa Göderer,  Ulrich Eysholdt, Anke Ziethe

11:15 am The Effect of Singers` Positions on Vocal Tract Configurations  During Professional Singing

  • Matthias Echternach, Luisa Traser, Michael Burdumy,  Marco Vicari, Bernhard Richter

11:30 am Panel Discussion

  • Moderator: Christy Ludlow
  • Guest Panelists: Michael M. Johns III, Brenda Jo Smith, author of the new Choral Pedagogy, Third Edition
  • Panelists: Johnson, Stemple, Petermann, Echternach

6:15 – 7:00 pm

CLINICAL VOICE MEASUREMENT TOOLS – HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

  • Chair: Linda Carroll

The Westin Philadelphia Hotel: Salon II

6:15 pm Voice Lab: Nuts and Bolts

 

Friday, May 31

WORKSHOP: TECHNOLOGY AND THE VOICE STUDIO

Technology in the 21st Century Voice Studio

 

Saturday, June 1

MEDICAL SESSION

Westin Philadelphia Hotel: Grand Ballroom, Salon I

9:15 am Spectral Analysis of Digital Kymography in Normal Adult Vocal Folds

10:00 am Degree of Dysplasia Based on Virus Typing in Patients with Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis Treated with Cidofovir

11:10 am G. Paul Moore Lecture by Thomas Murry, Plural author and consulting editor.

12:45 pm Development of the Voice Catastrophization Index: A Preliminary Investigation

1:00 pm Development and Preliminary Validation of a Tool to Measure Perceived Singing Voice Function (EASE)

  • Debbie Phyland, Michael S. Benninger author of The Singer’s Voice, Susan Thibeault, Julie Pallant, Neil Vallance, Julian Smith

3:00 pm New Treatment Option for Phonotraumatic Voice Disorders: Skin Surface Stimulation of Acupoints

  • Edwin M.L. Yiu author of Handbook of Voice Assessments, K.M.-K. Chan, E. Kwong, W. Tse, S. Wong, R. Tsang, Katherine Verdolini Abbott author of Lessac-Madsen Resonant Voice Therapy
  • Package, Z.X. Lin, W. Wei

4:00 pm Examination of Vocal Hygiene and Adherence to Home-Practice on Therapy Outcomes in Children with Bilateral Vocal Fold Lesions

  • Susan Baker Brehm, Barbara Weinrich and Lisa Kelchner authors of the upcoming Pediatric Voice, Stephanie Zacharias, Janet Middendorf, Janet Beckmeyer, Meredith Tabangin, Alessandro de Alarcon

4:15 pm Contemporary Management Approaches in Pediatric Vocal Health: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

6:00 pm PEDIATRIC VOICE THERAPY: THE 21ST CENTURY

The Franklin Room (Upstairs)

 

Sunday, June 2

9:00 am Comparison of Parent-Reported Vocal Symptoms with Pediatric Voice Handicap Index Scores in Children with Vocal Fold Lesions

  • Barbara Weinrich, Susan Baker Brehm, Stephanie Zacharias, Janet Middendorf, Janet Beckmeyer, Lisa Kelchner, Meredith Tabangin, Alessandro de Alarcon

9:15 am Arytenoid Chondroma

  • Jaime Eaglin Moore, Amanda Hu, Robert T. Sataloff

9:30 am Office-based Pulse-dye Laser Surgery for Laryngeal Lesions: A Retrospective Review

  • Amanda Hu, Aaron Centric, Yolanda, Heman-Ackah, Venu Divi, Robert T.Sataloff

3:45 pm The Low-Mandible Maneuver and its Resonential Implications for Singers of International Rank

  • Garyth Nair, Angelika Nair

VF

 

Plural Author in the News: Susan G. Allen

Plural Authors in the News

Plural author Susan G. Allen was recently invited by A.G. Bell to write an article with colleague Shefali Shah about their collaboration on 101 Frequently Asked Questions About Auditory-Verbal Practice. Together they answered question #49: Why is diagnostic work important in auditory-verbal therapy and education? In this article, Perspectives on the Profession: Susan G. Allen and Shefali Shah, they share their experience and knowledge regarding children with hearing loss.

Throughout her professional career Susan G. Allen has found that parents of children with hearing loss often lose their spontaneity with their child because they believe their child will no longer be able to have a normal life. She counsels that it is extremely important for parents to receive professional counseling to help them determine goals for their child, watch as they are accomplished, and thus alleviate their fears.

Circle of Listening

In this article she elaborates on the “Circle of Listening” Method and Hierarchy of Auditory Skills, which will be published in From Assessment to Intervention: A Guidebook for the Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired-Revised. The circle of listening is a process to assist in learning. “Using the circle, the child is more likely to comprehend AND store it in his/her memory bank for later retrieval by pairing the unknown with the known to generalize the information successfully.”

She also provides examples of how she balances formal and informal assessments to measure children’s progression. She stresses that both informal and formal measurements are critical in monitoring a child’s progress and achievement of goals. The Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired (APT/HI) allows for specific analysis of the individual’s ability to decode phonemes in isolation and in the context of words and sentences. APT/HI was developed by Susan G. Allen and is available on our website. She finds that formal speech perception tests works well to measure functional speech perception skills when combined with an informal listening skills checklist. “The ultimate goal is for the child to make appropriate progress and to reach performance at and above his/her chronological age so that he/she can be mainstreamed alongside their peers with typical hearing successfully.”

Susan G. AllenAbout the Author:

Susan G. Allen is co-author of the original APT/HI and the founder and director of the Clarke Jacksonville Auditory/Oral Center, one of five campuses of the CLARKE School for Deaf / Center for Oral Education. A speech-language pathologist and teacher of the deaf for over 40 years, Allen earned an undergraduate degree in education from the University of Michigan, a master’s degree in education of the deaf from Smith College and a master’s degree in special education with an emphasis on speech pathology from the University of North Florida. She has taught at universities, mentored staff and interns and presented over 80 papers, workshops and courses on teaching children with hearing loss and on the development of speech perception and speech production. At Clarke Jacksonville, Allen strives to provide children who are deaf or hard of hearing with the English language skills they need to succeed with their hearing peers in mainstream schools. She developed the APT/HI-R to assist interventionists in assessing and managing learning-to-listen skills for improving speech intelligibility and oral language which is published by Plural Publishing, Inc.

About the text:

From Assessment to Intervention: A Guidebook for the Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired-Revised is one of our most exciting upcoming texts. This guidebook clearly describes step-by-step processes for developing specific goals in audition, speech, and language for children who have completed the assessment. Numerous case studies are used to illustrate this process at various ages and levels of auditory functioning and speech/language development. Included is a DVD that is comprised of a learning module that includes PowerPoint slides and video clips of children with hearing loss being evaluated with the APT-HI-R. Intervention techniques also are demonstrated in the video clips. Practitioners working directly with children with hearing loss will find the DVD, Guidebook, and test (APT-HI-R) to be a tremendous resource, regardless of their employment setting.

 

References:

Allen, Susan G. & Shah, Shefali (2013). Perspectives on the Profession: Susan G. Allen and Shefali Shah. [Web blog post] Retrieved May 1, 2013 from http://www.listeningandspokenlanguage.org/Document.aspx?id=1849

Perigoe, C., Allen, S. G., & Dodson, C. (2012). Why is diagnostic work important in auditory-verbal therapy and education? In W. Estabrooks, 101 Frequently Asked Questions About Auditory-Verbal Practice, 382-387. Washington, D.C.:  Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Feature Article: Why Quality Matters: The Changing Healthcare Delivery Model

Brian Taylor

Why Quality Matters: The Changing Healthcare Delivery Model

By Brian Taylor, AuD

In fits and starts, physicians and other healthcare professionals are beginning to realize that the convergence of wireless sensors, social networking, mobile connectivity and robust data management systems will profoundly impact the future. This transformation of medicine is likely to put a premium on healthcare professionals that place the patient firmly in the center of the clinical experience. These same forces will undoubtedly affect audiologists and their support staffs, and quality is likely to be a key differentiator in a disruptive future.

In this new world, physicians and other healthcare professionals are more likely to be reimbursed for the quality of their results, rather than the sheer number of procedures they order. Hospitals and clinics that demonstrate higher-than-average patient satisfaction scores will enjoy higher rates of reimbursement from federally funded programs. Patients are even joining the quality bandwagon as many are demanding greater transparency when shopping for medical services. In essence, patients are demanding to be treated more like customers. Consumer-centered health care is gradually supplanting the antiquated, paternalistic model in which the practitioner is never questioned and has near omnipotent authority over the uninformed patient. Out of this paradigm shift comes the quality movement. For audiologists this means the use of report cards, key performance indicators, and other quality strategies and tactics, if they want to stay relevant in a highly competitive marketplace. If you are like the typical practitioner, there is a good chance these concepts related to quality sound a little strange to you now. This is why I wrote Quality in Audiology: Design and Implementation of the Patient Experience, to help you prepare for some of these changes.

Interestingly, hearing aid manufacturers are very familiar with many of these concepts. In an effort to rise above their fierce competition, manufacturers have been obligated to standardize quality within their production lines by using tools such as Six Sigma and Total Quality Management. At the heart of these quality tools is a drive to eliminate variance. Eliminating variance is a worthy goal for the optimization of medical devices, but clinicians know all-too-well that each patient has built-in variability. Thus, many of the quality concepts and tools device manufacturers have come to rely on to incrementally improve quality don’t work well with patients. This paradox of quality within healthcare, as the book suggests, can be overcome through the standardization of quality around six patient staging areas.

Taylor_QA

The purpose of this book is to bring a level of practicality to the implementation of quality within an audiology clinic. As the book proposes, quality is improved mainly through your grassroots initiatives: procedures, programs, and behaviors you implement, measure, and manage in your clinic. This grassroots perspective requires audiologists and other professionals associated with hearing heath care to reexamine the concept of quality. According to the International Standards Organization, which acts as a sort of quality police for device manufactures, quality is the totality of characteristics, including people, processes, products environments, standards, and learning, of an entity that bear upon its ability to satisfy stated and implied needs. This definition suggests we improve ourselves and our ability to create quality in the world around us through innovation and the judicious use of best practice standards.

From a workaday, clinical standpoint, quality is meeting the requirements and expectations of patients and stakeholders in the business. In short, quality is probably best defined as the standardization of individual excellence. Rather than rely on academic boards and government agencies, the quest for better quality begins with self-motivated and dedicated audiologists and support staff who can use data to make better decisions about their patients. Quality in Audiology will get you on the path to continuous improvement in your clinic.

AudiologyNOW! Schedule of Author Signings

Thursday, April 4:

12:00-1:00 pm: Robert G. Glaser and Robert M. Traynor, authors of the new Strategic Practice Management, Second Edition

2:00-3:00 pm: Brian Taylor, H. Gustav Mueller, Ruth Bentler and Todd Ricketts, authors of many books on hearing aids

3:30pm-4:00 pm:  Virginia Ramachandran and Brad Stach, authors of the new Professional Communication in Audiology

Thursday Signing AudiologyNOW


Friday, April 5:

9:00-10:00am: Lisa Hunter and Navid Shahnaz authors of the new Acoustic Immittance Measures: Basic and Advanced Practice
10:00-11:00am: Donna Geffner, co-author of Auditory Processing Disorders, Second Edition

11:00-12:00pm: Devin L. McCaslin, author of Electronystagmography and Videonystagmography (ENG/VNG)

12:00-1:00pm: Joseph J. Montano and Jaclyn B. Spitzer, authors of the new Adult Audiologic Rehabilitation, Second Edition

2:00-3:00 pm: René H. Gifford, author of the new Cochlear Implant Patient Assessment: Evaluation of Candidacy, Performance, and Outcomes

Friday Signing AudiologyNOW

**Make sure to come out and visit us at AudiologyNOW! for our author signings so you can meet the authors.

Plural Author News: Dr. Rene Gifford – Cochlear implant users report dramatically better hearing with new Vanderbilt process

We love to share news of what our authors are up to and their successes. Here’s some news out of Vanderbilt University featuring Dr. Rene Gifford, author of the new book Cochlear Implant Patient Assessment: Evaluation of Candidacy, Performance, and Outcomes.

 

High Fidelity: Cochlear implant users report dramatically better hearing with new Vanderbilt process

Congratulations Dr. Gifford!

 

 

 

 

A Tribute To Plural Author Gene J. Brutten, PhD

Plural has a lost a dear friend. One of our authors, Dr. Gene Brutten passed away on March 4, 2013 at the age of 84. Dr. Brutten and his wife, Dr. Martine Vanryckeghem wrote several successful Plural books and are part of the Plural family.

Dr. Brutten was a renowned speech-language pathologist, and was a recognized expert on the treatment of stuttering. Widely published, we were blessed to have him on our roster of authors.

Angie Singh, Plural President with Drs. Brutten and Vanryckeghem at the ASHA 2012 conference.

Plural President Angie Singh with Drs. Brutten and Vanryckeghem at the ASHA 2012 conference.

    book_kiddycat

Dr. Brutten’s obituary published in the Orlando Sentinel can be viewed here. Donations in honor of Dr. Brutten can be made to the American Heart Association.

Our heartfelt condolences go out to his dear wife Martine, their two children and their families, friends, and colleagues. You will be missed, Dr. Brutten! We will especially miss spending time with you at our booth at ASHA. It will not be the same without a hug and seeing your beautiful smile.

 

FIRST LOOK: Sound Auditory Training – a new tool for treating patients with CAPD

By Dr. Gail Chermak

Coming soon: Web-based auditory training exercises—Sound Auditory Training—developed by Gail Chermak, Frank Musiek, and Jeffrey Weihing. Based on a wealth of empirical evidence on the neuroscience, diagnosis and treatment of central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), Sound Auditory Training is designed to train auditory processing skills in children, adults, and older adults with CAPD as well as other clinical populations, such as patients with cochlear implants. Sound Auditory Training (SAT) makes available well controlled stimuli that can be customized to exercise a number of fundamental auditory skills. In addition to training, SAT provides clinicians with a toolset to design one’s own training tasks and evaluate auditory skills, and provides clinical scientists with highly accessible stimuli to design psychoacoustic procedures. While the developers offer general guidelines for selecting specific tasks and setting parameters based on clinical profiles, SAT is not a program nor is it a test. Rather, SAT is toolset that includes adaptable auditory stimuli, a range of auditory tasks, and engaging graphic interfaces to meet the clinical or research needs of the professional.

The prevalence of CAPD is estimated at 5% of school-aged children and up to 70% of adults and older adults experiencing hearing and listening problems. The underlying impairments of individuals with CAPD are varied and not currently reducible to a single deficit.  Auditory processing deficits frequently are seen in a number of other disorders including learning disabilities, dyslexia, language impairment, attention deficit disorder (ADHD), and autism. In order to properly describe and treat basic auditory deficits that can affect listening, communication, and learning, one needs to have a flexible, but easy to use tool that spans temporal, spectral, and binaural processing.  The architecture of Sound Auditory Training incorporates the flexibility necessary to adapt stimuli for training regimens to meet the needs of particular individuals. The software provides the flexibility to train in either a game environment for children or a more standard psychophysical paradigm for adults.

Sound Auditory Training relies on adaptive algorithms (i.e., the program changes in response to the user’s performance), flexible feedback to the user (via animations or counters), and flexible parameter settings for the clinician/clinical scientist, parents, educators, and users. Tasks train intensity, frequency, and temporal detection, discrimination, and identification using a variety of non-verbal (e.g., tones, noise) and minimally loaded verbal stimuli (e.g., consonant-vowel syllables). Immediate feedback (error correction and reinforcement) is provided through animations within the game. Skills are practiced intensively until they become habitual and automatic. The exercises are sequenced to challenge but not overwhelm the participant. The clinician can use the software to obtain a more comprehensive profile of an individual’s skill strengths and skill deficits in order to more efficiently and effectively target and train deficit areas on a variety of auditory tasks.

In addition to its usefulness to clinical professionals, Sound Auditory Training is designed to be accessible to parents and teachers so that the exercises can be administered in a non-clinical environment. It is also designed to meet the needs of researchers to serve as a tool for investigation of auditory psychophysics, especially with children.  The flexibility of the program allows updates based in research and thus promotes evidence-based practice.

Sound Auditory Training provides auditory training exercises that encompass a wide range of auditory processing skills. There is no other product like it! Most important, Sound Auditory Training exercises auditory skills which are most likely to have a meaningful impact on a person’s listening, communication, and learning.