Writing Tips from Plural Authors

Have you ever thought of writing a book in your field? We know that writing a book is no small undertaking, so as part of our 10 year anniversary celebration we enlisted the help of our knowledgeable authors Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Lynn Adams, PhD, CCC-SLP, and Lise Menn, PhD, to share advice on writing a best-selling book! Here you will gain some insight into the inspiration, motivation and hard work that goes into a best-selling Speech-Language Pathology and/or Audiology textbook and professional book.

1. What insight or tips would you offer to a first-time author who is writing a professional development book or textbook in the Speech-Language Pathology and/or Audiology field?

CRM: It is very important to make sure that your contribution is original—something that meets a need in the field. I never write a book that competes exactly with something currently in print. I always make sure that my book is unique, original, and has a perspective that no other book has. The questions I also ask are: who would want to buy my book? Why would they spend money on it? What value does it bring to them? What problems does my book help them solve?
It is so important to think about meeting the needs of your audience. As authors, we have our passions and enthusiasms. Who shares them?

LA: JUST START WRITING…..that is the hardest part!!

LM: Have a colleague in a related but different field read through your book to make sure it’s understandable to someone who doesn’t already know the subject matter.

Go back to the original published sources – amazing amounts of old material are easy to get on-line, and you’ll find that you get fresh insights from reading the classic papers instead of relying on the usual summaries. What you take away from a paper that you read for yourself might be quite different from what everyone else has said about it.

Create or find new examples instead of re-using the standard ones that everyone else uses. You might discover something in the process, too. Continue reading

Interprofessional Education: Future Directions in Pre-professional Instruction

Child and Adolescent Communication DisordersMARIE R. KERINS

By: Marie R. Kerins, EdD, CCC-SLP, Loyola University Maryland
Editor of Child and Adolescent Communication Disorders: Organic and Neurogenic Bases

Interprofessional Education (IPE) is becoming a more recognized model for educating pre-professional students entering the healthcare or education workforce. It is quickly gaining momentum in institutions of higher education as a means of addressing some of the fragmentation observed in the healthcare industry and in the schools, both of which strive to produce positive and lasting outcomes for the individuals and communities they serve. Working collaboratively mends fragmentation, reduces duplicative efforts, and effectively addresses client/student needs. The World Health Organization (WHO) has endorsed IPE and defines it as a period when “two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve [health] outcomes” (WHO, 2010, p. 7). Formalizing IPE through published guidelines from organizations such as the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) has helped renew interest in interdisciplinary and collaborative practices that have been around for quite some time but have not been systematically or formally taught in higher education settings. While the WHO and IPEC are geared more toward international health care practices, professionals working in schools have also joined in the conversation and are adopting the language of IPE. One goal of IPE is to develop a practice ready workforce where professionals can immediately implement knowledge and skills they have practiced while training in an integrated and interdisciplinary manner. Evidence is mounting to support interprofessional care (see Reeves, Perrier, Goldman, Freeth, & Zwarestein, 2013; WHO, 2010). IPE and collaborative practice will become an established manner of service delivery to improve patient/student care, if we can embrace interprofessional education as a shared vision with an understanding of the benefits of this new collaborative curriculum.

Collaborative Internship Experience: Speech-Language Pathologists and Reading Specialists

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Are Your Services Educationally Relevant?

Jean BlosserSchool Programs in Speech-Language Pathology 5th Edition

Jean L. Blosser, EdD, CCC-SLP
President, Creative Strategies for Special Education
Author, School Programs in Speech-Language Pathology: Organization and Service Delivery, Fifth Edition, Plural Publishing, 2012

Educational Relevance—What an Important Concept!
Does a child’s disability impact his or her performance in the classroom? If yes, would services such as speech-language intervention, occupational therapy, or physical therapy make a difference? Should those services be intensive, provided face-to-face or via technology, or integrated into the classroom? The primary question is, if therapy services are offered, will the intervention provided make a difference in the student’s classroom performance, ability to access the curriculum, and/or ability to reach his or her potential?

These are huge questions that administrators, educators, clinicians, and parents ponder every day. When school teams evaluate a student, they seek to determine how the disability may be interfering with the student’s learning. Key educational areas that may be affected are academic, social-emotional, and vocational performance. If everyone agrees there is an adverse effect on educational performance, the student’s eligibility for services is confirmed.

How Do We Guarantee Educational Relevance? Continue reading

Winter Break Photo Sweepstakes!

Winter Break Photo Sweepstakes

Win a free textbook for the spring semester by entering our Winter Break Photo Sweepstakes! Show us how you learn, teach and make a difference with your Plural Publishing books and enter to win ANY Plural book of your choice! The sweepstakes starts January 5th and ends January 15th. The winner will be announced on January 16th!

How To Win:
1.  Post a picture on Twitter and/or Pinterest of yourself studying, teaching or working with your Plural book(s). One photo entry per person please.
2.  Tag @PluralPub and use #PluralSweeps in your post.
3.  Follow us on Twitter and Pinterest
4.  Vote for your favorite entries by commenting and liking the photos you think should win.  Entries can be found using #PluralSweeps on Twitter and on our Winter Break Photo Sweeps Pinterest Board.  All entries will be pinned to the sweepstakes Pinterest board. Encourage friends to vote as well!

The photo with the most likes and comments by the end of January 15th wins! All entrants will receive a 15% discount code valid at www.PluralPublishing.com.  Entrants will be contacted through direct messaging on Pinterest or Twitter.

We can’t wait to see your creative, fun photos!

Management of Facial Paralysis

By Mark K. Wax, MD

Editor of Facial Paralysis: A Comprehensive Rehabilitative Approach

Facial Paralysis: A Comprehensive Rehabilitative Approach

Facial Paralysis: A Comprehensive Rehabilitative Approach

Facial paralysis is a devastating process. Normal facial function is of paramount importance in both cosmesis and how individuals are perceived by others. It also plays a role in natural physiological processes. When the facial nerve—which provides animation to the muscles of the face—is paralyzed, there are severe cosmetic, psychological, as well as physiologic sequelae. The facial plastic surgeon has the ability to play a unique role in both the reconstruction and the rehabilitation of the adverse effects of facial paralysis. Management paradigms for the multitude of issues that face these patients involve a team approach—not only facial plastic surgeons, but also speech pathologists, physiotherapists, social workers, family, and so forth. The facial plastic surgeon stands at the epicenter, able to direct the care of the patient to these different specialists. Continue reading

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Novice to Expert Clinician

By John McCarthy, PhD, CCC-SLP and Aimee Dietz, PhD, CCC-SLP

Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication by John McCarthy and Aimee Dietz

Understanding the personal story of an individual who uses augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can have a positive impact on the attitudes of people without disabilities toward that individual (McCarthy, Donofrio-Horwitz, & Smucker, 2010). Almost any AAC specialist has story after story of moments when they have helped reveal the true abilities of an individual through AAC:

• The eight-year-old boy with cerebral palsy who everyone assumed had below average intellectual ability and presymbolic language skills, was in fact bilingual.
• The forty-year-old woman with bulbar onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who cannot dress or feed herself, but still manages her finances, parents her children, and makes end-of-life decisions.
• The eighteen-year-old girl with autism spectrum disorder whose potential to contribute to society was doubted, yet planned for employment after high school and managed a new mobile device-based communication system.
• The fifty-two-year-old man with stroke-induced aphasia who medical staff assumed was “incompetent”; however, still made informed decisions about medical care and enjoyed friendly banter on the golf course with his adult sons.  Continue reading

Ten Advances in Cochlear Implant Technology and Services

By: Jace Wolfe, PhD

Over the past several years, there have been numerous advances in cochlear implant technology and services. As recent as a decade ago, there were little to no technological solutions available to assist a cochlear implant candidate/recipient, who presented with severe to profound hearing loss, with speech recognition in difficult listening situations—understanding speech in noisy and reverberant settings, over the telephone or television, and when spoken from a distance. Today, cochlear implant manufacturers offer a wide variety of solutions to meet the needs of patients with hearing aids or cochlear implant processors who struggle to communicate. This article identifies ten ways in which cochlear implant technology and services have evolved and improved in the past few years.

10. Automatic scene classification: Hearing aids have featured acoustic scene classifiers for almost a decade. Through these systems, hearing aids classify an environment as one that possesses background noise, speech in quiet or in noise, music, wind, and so forth. Once the listening situation is classified into one of these environments, the hearing aid selects the appropriate form of signal processing that will theoretically optimize performance in the given environment. This technology can be quite valuable as many users are unlikely to manually switch to programs designed for specific, challenging situations. Furthermore, this system will likely be well-received by cochlear implant users as it makes its way to implant sound processors.

9. The development of new speech recognition materials that provide a more realistic assessment of how hearing aid and implant users perform in real-life listening situations: Cochlear implant technology has improved so much that many users score near 100% correct on sentence recognition tests in a quiet environment with a single talker who is male and speaks at a slow to moderate rate. Additionally, many hearing aid users who struggle substantially in realistic situations also often score too well on these tests to meet the indications for cochlear implant candidacy. This fact makes it difficult to distinguish between excellent implant and hearing aid users and good users who may benefit from additional services.

Continue reading

Reflections on 10 years at Plural

An interview with Plural President, Angie Singh

Angie Singh

Angie Singh, Plural Publishing’s President

What is your favorite moment in Plural’s history?

“My favorite moment occurred before Plural was incorporated. Some of the things we had most valued and had come to miss most in the ten years after the sale of Singular [the Singh's previous publishing house] were the close relationships, daily interactions and sense of purpose and commitment that we had shared with our authors.

One day, I received a call from longtime friend and Singular author Dr. Robert Sataloff, who suggested that we should start a new company. The idea intrigued my beloved husband and me but it also presented us with many challenges and concerns that included financial investment and the extraordinary time commitments that would alter and affect our lifestyle, especially with our eight year old twins.

We managed to overcome the most serious of concerns and embarked on a journey that became Plural Publishing. We were immediately pleased to learn that many of our past authors were eager to join us in the new venture. Ten years after founding Plural, I couldn’t be more gratified.” Continue reading

Featured Article: One New Year’s Resolution to Keep

One New Year’s resolution to keep – learn more about being an effective speech-language pathology assistant (SLPA) supervisor

by Plural author Jennifer Ostergren

If you are like me, as 2014 swings into full gear, you look to your newly inked New Year’s resolutions. One resolution on my list this year is to expand my knowledge and skills as an educator and supervisor of speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs). Those of you with similar aspirations know that serving as an SLPA supervisor can be highly rewarding, but also challenging, especially given a lack of resources and tools specific to SLPAs. This year, however, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) continues to expand its efforts in this area, with new programs, policies, and resources specific to SLPAs and their supervisors. In particular, ASHA’s new Practice Portal on the topic of SLPAs, located at http://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Professional-Issues/Speech-Language-Pathology-Assistants/, is an excellent source of current information and resources on this topic. The sections that follow also highlight several key resources from ASHA that may be of help as well. Continue reading

Featured Article: The Challenge of Clinical Education in Speech-Language Pathology

By James M. Mancinelli, MS CCC-SLP and Evelyn Klein, PhD. CCC-SLP

This article provides an overview of important issues facing clinical training of graduate students today. In light of current training models, budget constraints, staffing shortages, and productivity demands, it is time to take a hard look at the requirements and demands set by our profession in the hopes of making needed changes

The 2005 and 2014 ASHA Standards require that the student enrolled in a Master’s degree program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) obtain 400 clinical hours “across the lifespan with varied disorders”: 375 hours in direct contact with the patient/client and 25 observation hours.  This is a broad guideline and superficially seems reasonable and achievable. After all, the requirement that the student obtain a specified number of contact hours in each of the disorders, with adults and children, in assessment and treatment have been removed. Unfortunately, the current service delivery contexts in which speech-language pathologists practice are all impacted by fiscal constraints, staffing shortages, and productivity requirements.  Although these three factors may not necessarily affect the quality of care, they are seriously impacting the ability to clinically train graduate students in CSD.  It is imperative that other models be developed for clinical education and training and that the discipline reviews the evidence that supports maintaining the status quo.  This is especially critical as some programs are being asked to admit more students into the graduate program, creating the need for even more external clinical practicum experiences. Continue reading