The Ineffectiveness of Checklists in Diagnosing Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

Margaret_Fish  Fish_HHTCASE2E_low res

By Margaret Fish, MS, CCC-SLP, author of Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Second Edition

Sorting through evaluation findings for young children with complex speech sound disorders can be confusing and challenging. As SLPs we strive to complete thorough evaluations and make sense of our evaluation findings to achieve an accurate diagnosis; however, many of the characteristics of CAS overlap with other types of speech sound disorders. Certain key characteristics from a CAS checklist such as inconsistency, atypical prosody, groping, or vowel errors may raise red flags for a diagnosis of CAS, but these characteristics alone should not predetermine the diagnosis until a thorough analysis of the child’s speech productions is completed.

Following are case studies of two children recently seen for consultations. Both children had an incoming diagnosis of CAS, but only one child was given a definitive diagnosis of CAS at the conclusion of the consultation. The other child demonstrated a number of characteristics commonly associated with CAS, but after careful examination of the child’s speech, the underlying nature of the challenges was not consistent with the core impairment of CAS that ASHA (2007) describes as the “planning and/or programming (of) spatiotemporal parameters of movement sequences.”

Case Study 1.

Mark, age 3 years, 7 months, had recently received a diagnosis of CAS by a diagnostic team at a local hospital. The diagnosis was based primarily on the following factors:

  • Reduced speech intelligibility (judged to be 50% intelligible)
  • A nearly complete repertoire of consonants and vowels
  • Inconsistent productions of the same word
  • Occasional vowel errors
  • Atypical speech prosody

Because of Mark’s limited speech intelligibility, inconsistency, vowel errors, and prosody differences, it was understandable how a diagnosis of CAS was made, as these characteristics often are associated with a positive diagnosis of CAS. Indeed, the use of a checklist of CAS characteristics alone could lead a clinician to conclude that Mark had CAS.

Continue reading

How to Work with Interpreters and Translators

Henriette_Langdon  Langdon_WWIT  Terry_Saenz

By Henriette W. Langdon, Ed.D., FCCC-SLP and Terry I. Saenz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, authors of Working with Interpreters and Translators: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists

Our world is increasingly heterogeneous. English is no longer the only language spoken in the United States, England, or Australia. French is not the only main language spoken in France and neither is German the only language spoken in Germany. Immigration caused by political and economical changes has dispersed many people to other countries in the world in search of better opportunities. Consequently, communication between these individuals and residents of the different countries is often disrupted due to the lack of a common language. This challenge has existed throughout humankind, but it seems that it has increased in the last century or so. There have always been people who knew two languages that needed bridging, but now this urgency is more pronounced. The need for professionally trained interpreters was first noted following the end of WWI when the Unites States was first involved in world peace talks alongside many nations with representatives who all spoke a variety of languages. This historical event eventually led the League of Nations to the foundation of the École d’Intèrpretes in Geneva, Switzerland in 1924. Since that time, many other schools that train bilingual interpreters to participate in international conferences have been established. The AIIC [Association Internationale des Interprètes de Conférence (International Association of Conference Interpreters)] Interpreting Schools directory lists a total of 87 schools worldwide: http://aiic.net/directories/schools/georegions. The reader can gather information on which specific language pairs are emphasized in the various training schools; for example, Arabic-English; French-Spanish, Chinese-English, and so forth. Thus, interpreting for international conferences is a well-established profession today, offering specific training and certificates. However, interpreting is necessary not only for international conferences, but also to assist in bridging the communication in everyday contexts such as medical or health, judicial, educational (schools) and the community at large. Training and certification in areas such as medical and judicial have slowly emerged and are available to those who need them in various states throughout the United States. Legislation has been the primary force in the establishment of certificates in the areas of medical and legal interpreting. However, training in other areas where interpreting is needed such as education, and our professions, speech pathology and audiology, are notoriously lacking. There are some situations where medical interpreters can assist speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists in a hospital or rehabilitation center, but even those interpreters may not have the specific terminology and practice or procedures to work effectively with our professionals. Working with Interpreters and Translators: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists is a second revised and expanded edition on this topic that provides SLPs, audiologists, and interpreters who collaborate with them some concrete tools and strategies on how best to conduct interviews, conferences, and assessments when the client and/or family does not speak English fluently.  The proposed process is based on information gathered from other interpreting professions. The research, and some personal interviews with audiologists in particular that were conducted to assemble this information, indicate that the process is conducted haphazardly at best.  The literature available on the collaboration between SLPs and interpreters indicates that both parties are not secure about procedure and must learn how to work together by trial and error. Often the SLP does not trust the interpreter and the interpreter does not follow suggested procedures, such as failing to interpret all that is being said, conducting a side conversation with a parent during a meeting, and giving the child unnecessary cuing during testing (if tests are available in the child’s language, which is primarily Spanish). Literature on working effectively with audiologists is almost nonexistent; therefore, the first author resorted to several personal interviews with audiologists, a specialist of the deaf and hard of hearing, and professors of audiology throughout the country. Often individuals who perform the duties and responsibilities of the interpreter and who are hired to do this job are not fully bilingual; they may speak the two languages, but may not be able to read or write the language they are using to interpret. These interpreters are often not respected, are not treated as professionals, and their pay is very low.

Continue reading

ASHA 2015 Preview

The 2015 ASHA Convention starts November 12 in Denver and is shaping up to be one of the largest ever. If you are attending this year’s meeting, please stop by our booth (#804) for the following:

  • Save 20% with free shipping!
  • Connect with experts at one of our Meet the Author sessions (schedule to be announced November 11)
  • Browse our new textbooks and request a review copy for your course
  • Meet with Valerie Johns, Executive Editor, about any ideas for a new book

Attend the session, then buy the book!
We have many new books debuting by authors that are presenting at ASHA 2015 on their book topics.

Session Title: Drawing from Different Settings: A Panel Presentation on School-Based Swallowing & Feeding
Presenter(s):  Emily Homer (presenting author); Lisa Mabry-Price (presenting author); Kim Priola (presenting author); Gayla Lutz (presenting author); Donna Edwards  (presenting author); Lissa Power-deFur (presenting author)
Day: Thursday, November 12, 2015 Time: 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM                                     Book title(s): Management of Swallowing and Feeding Disorders in Schools and Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist: Standards-Based Intervention for Special Populations

Session Title: Assessing the Validity of Remote MAPping for Children With Cochlear Implants
Presenter(s): Emma Rushbrooke (presenting author); Louise Hickson; Belinda Henry; Wendy Arnott
Day: Thursday, November 12, 2015 Time: 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM
Book title(s): Telepractice in Audiology and Evidence-Based Practice in Audiology: Evaluating Interventions for Children and Adults with Hearing Impairment 

Session Title: Trauma & Tinnitus
Presenter(s): Marc Fagelson (presenting author)
Day: Thursday, November 12, 2015 Time: 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Book title: Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives 

Continue reading

Managing the Expectations of the Common Core State Standards

Lissa_Power-deFur      PowerdeFur_CCSS

By Lissa A. Power-deFur, author of Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist: Standards-Based Intervention for Special Population

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in school districts across the country have returned to school, often with the new (or renewed) obligation of addressing the “Common Core” (or the “Career and College Readiness Standards” as the Common Core State Standards [CCSS] is referred to in some states.) The SLPs’ reactions are likely to include the following:

  • With all the students on my caseload, how can I possibly do something else?
  • This is just another education fad; it’ll pass in a couple of years.
  • From what I hear about these standards, they aren’t applicable to the students on my caseload.
  • I’m focusing on the IEP goals, they are most important for my students.

These are common reactions, reflecting the current challenges and pressures of working as an SLP in the schools. However, it is important that all SLPs working with children, whether in schools or other settings, understand that the CCSS is now the lens through which educators must view the achievement of all students, including students with speech-language impairments. The education standards movement has been in place for over two decades, with states first adopting their own standards and developing assessments to measure student achievement of those standards. More recently, the National Governors’ Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, used teams of educators, business professionals, and policy-makers to develop the Common Core State Standards. Released in 2010, 43 states have adopted the CCSS. The Standards serve as the basis for state assessments developed by two consortiums, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.

As SLPs study the CCSS, they will find that the Standards encompass a hierarchy of language skills from phonological awareness to the ability to understanding diverse perspectives, from comprehension of discipline-specific vocabulary to syntactic complexity in speech and text. The CCSS emphasize oral language and phonological awareness in the primary grades, as kindergarteners must demonstrate skills in counting, pronouncing, blending, and segmenting syllables in spoken words. The CCSS expect secondary students to use oral communication effectively to present findings and support their evidence clearly and concisely using a style appropriate to the audience and task. In the vocabulary area, students must demonstrate such diverse skills as mastery of morphology for understanding meaning to becoming adept at understanding euphemisms, hyperbole, and paradox. Students’ skills in the conventions of Standard English develop from early skills in using nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to secondary level skills in using parallel structure in their oral and written communication.

The CCSS provide an excellent vehicle for SLPs to use to support collaboration with their education partners. As SLPs communicate with teachers, the CCSS provides a common vocabulary to describe student expectations and performance, thereby facilitating the education team’s focus on needed language and communication skills. A typical child on the SLP’s caseload will have difficulty acquiring standards from prior grade levels. The CCSS can serve as a resource SLPs can use in explaining the effect of children’s speech-language impairments on their ability to master specific standards. By using the language of the CCSS in describing students’ performance, the SLP’s ability to communicate with teachers and administrators about the challenges the child is and will be facing is enhanced.

SLPs will find that an analysis model facilitates their ability to integrate the standards into their intervention planning. A 5-step model builds upon SLPs’ extensive knowledge of the language and metalinguistic skills and leads to development of collaborative direct and classroom-based intervention activities. In step 1, SLPs work collaboratively to identify the standards needed for success. SLPs will analyze the CCSS, identifying the specific expectations that will rely on the student’s language and communication skills. Due to the magnitude of the CCSS, this task quickly becomes overwhelming. Therefore, SLPs are urged to follow the practice of their education partners—creating teams to review the standards. By working with colleagues, SLPs can focus on the areas that relate to their expertise. For example, SLPs with specialization in fluency can review the standards for expectations for oral communication and presentations. SLPs with a passion for literacy can focus on these standards. Another approach would be for SLPs to focus on all standards or the grade levels they serve (or the grade levels their students have just left and will be moving into). Not only does teamwork minimize the workload, it enables the creative generation ideas that flow from a collaborative group of professionals. The Plural book, Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist:  Standards-based Interventions for Special Populations, provides SLPs with examples of the language and communication expectations of the standards.

The model’s second step focuses on detailed identification of the language and communication skills needed for success. This analysis addresses phonology, morpho-syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic and metalinguistic skills. The SLPs will find standards that require competency in speech sound production and fluency as well. This is another task completed well by a team of SLPs, reducing the workload and facilitating the brainstorming and analysis. The result will be a comprehensive understanding of the standards.

Step 3 shifts the attention from the standards to individual students. The SLP will complete a thorough analysis of a student’s current skills and needs. Data sources include standardized assessments, observations of the child in the classroom, classroom work samples (e.g., narratives, spelling tests), and probes of specific skills. Many of these items will be found in the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) of the child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). However, SLPs will find that they will want to generate skill-specific probes to understand the nuances of the child’s needs as they plan for intervention.

At this point, the SLP’s focus shifts to consideration of the expectations in the child’s classroom. The SLP will use information from observations to identify the language of the classroom communications, especially directions, texts, and instructional activities. A specific focus on morphological-syntactic constructions and vocabulary will enable the SLP to focus on specific skills the child will need for success. If multiple SLPs have children in this same classroom, this can be a joint activity.

The final step is to design intervention. Children’s academic success relies on their ability to apply the language and communication skills developed under the guidance of the SLP into real-world settings (i.e., the classroom). Therefore, the intervention should be a combination of direct intervention and collaborative classroom-based intervention. This combination of approaches allows for a specific focus on skill attainment, followed by application of that skill. The SLP may find it particularly valuable to participate in classroom center activities, working with specific children and facilitating their mastery of skills through collaboration with other students. This step relies on a collegial working relationship with the child’s classroom teacher(s), with time for planning to enable both professionals to identify which skills they will focus on and the nature of interventions.

The use of a stepwise model for analyzing the standards and applying this information to the strengths and needs of a specific child enables the SLP to tailor intervention to what matters for children—academic success. It is only through the SLP’s comprehensive knowledge of the academic standards and analysis of the specific linguistic expectations of the standards that students with language and communication difficulties can successfully meet the academic demands of 21st century schools.

About the Author 

Lissa A. Power-deFur, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, is a professor in the communication sciences and disorders program at Longwood University in Virginia. Among the courses she teaches is public school methods, which focuses on supporting children’s mastery of the language expectations of the Common Core State Standards. In her clinical role at Longwood, she has collaborated with local school districts for service delivery. She received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in speech-language pathology at the University of Virginia. She is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Virginia, and regularly volunteers for the profession. Dr. Power-deFur has served as a state education advocacy leader and as a member of numerous education-related committees at ASHA. She is the ASHA 2014–2016 vice president of standards and ethics in speech-language pathology. Additionally, she received The ASHA Leader Outstanding Service Award for her 2011 article on special education eligibility.

 

 

Plural books honored as Doody’s Core Titles for 2015

We are thrilled to announce that Doody’s has released its Core Titles in the Health Sciences for 2015 which includes 21 Plural books! Doody’s Core Titles in the Health Sciences 2015 is primarily for medical, nursing, and allied health librarians around the world who are charged with making the book buying decisions for their libraries within budget guidelines. A core title is a book or software title that represents essential knowledge needed by professionals or students in a given discipline and is highly recommended for the collection of a library that serves health sciences specialists.

Core Titles for 2015:

2015 Plural Publishing Research Award Winners

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2015 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and the honorees and their faculty sponsors were acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting, which took place this year in Newport Beach, California, April 15-18.

“We received 82 complete applications for the Research Awards this year. The quality was very high in all of these applications, making for a lively review process. In the end, there was one each at the MS/AuD level and the PhD level that were truly outstanding,” according to Richard C. Folsom, who chaired the award committee this year.

Eric Bostwick, 2015 Research Award Winner

Eric Bostwick, 2015 Plural Research Award Winner

At the MS/AuD level, the award went to Eric Bostwick at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Eric is an AuD student working with Dr. Bob Lutfi and his research is entitled, “Decision Weights and Stimulus-Frequency Otoacoustic Emissions.”

Bridget Perry, 2015 Research Award Winner

Bridget Perry, 2015 Plural Research Award Winner

At the PhD level, the award went to Bridget Perry at the MGH Institute in Boston. Bridget is a PhD student working with Dr. Jordan Green and her research is entitled “Early Detection of Dysphagia in ALS.”

Plural Author Blake Wilson Awarded Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize

Blake WilsonOn January 7, 2015 the National Academy of Engineering announced that the 2015 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize would be awarded to Blake S. Wilson, Grame M. Clark, Erwin Hochmair, Ingebord J. Hochmair-Desoyer, and Michael M. Merzench “for engineering cochlear implants that enable the deaf to hear.” The $500,000 biennial award recognizes a bioengineering achievement that significantly improves the human condition.1

“This year’s Russ Prize recipients personify how engineering transforms the health and happiness of people across the globe,” said NAE President C.D. Mote Jr. “The creators of the cochlear implant have improved remarkably the lives of people everywhere who are hearing impaired.”1

Dr. Blake S. Wilson is the Co-Director (with Debara L. Tucci, MD) of the Duke Hearing Center and is an adjunct professor in each of two departments at Duke, Surgery and Electrical Engineering. He also is the chief strategy advisor for MED-EL Medical Electronics GmbH of Innsbruck, Austria, and a Senior Fellow Emeritus of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in the Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. He has been involved in the development of the cochlear implant (CI) for the past three decades, and is the inventor of many of the signal processing strategies used with the present-day devices.

Dr. Wilson and the teams he has directed have been recognized with a high number of awards and honors, most notably the 1996 Discover Award for Technological Innovation; the American Otological Society’s President’s Citation in 1997 for Major contributions to the restoration of hearing in profoundly deaf persons (to the RTI team); the 2007 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke; the Neel Distinguished Research Lectureship at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery; and recently the Lasker-De-Bakey Clinical Medicine Research Award in 2013.

Better Hearing with Cochlear ImplantsDr. Wilson co-authored Plural Publishing book Better Hearing with Cochlear Implants which provides a comprehensive account of a decades-long research effort to improve cochlear implants (CIs). The research was conducted primarily at the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in North Carolina, USA, and the results provided key pillars in the foundation for the present-day devices.

 

1. National Academy of Engineering. Inventors of Cochlear Implant Win 2015 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize [Press Release]. Retrieved from http://www.nae.edu/Projects/MediaRoom/20095/107830/129146.aspx

A Tribute To Marion Downs

As many of you know, Dr. Marion Downs passed away recently. Here we post a nice tribute written by Dr. Jerry Northern that he shared with us.

Dr. Marion Downs Passes Away at Age 100 World-renowned Audiologist and Pioneer for Infant Hearing Screening

Dr. Marion Downs Passes Away at Age 100
World-renowned Audiologist and Pioneer for Infant Hearing Screening

Dr. Marion P. Downs, an innovator in the field of pediatric audiology and a tireless advocate for the early identification of hearing loss, passed away on November 13th, 2014. During her extraordinary career at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Dr. Downs developed and evaluated techniques for testing hearing in babies and young children and for fitting them with hearing aids. Dr. Downs created the first universal infant hearing-screening program in 1963 in Denver, CO. She relentlessly pursued making the identification and management of hearing loss in infants and children an important medical, educational, and public health issue. Her professional publications and lectures brought worldwide attention to the importance of early intervention for hearing loss. Today, in the United States, more than 96% of all infants born in the US receive a newborn hearing screening thanks largely to her efforts. Numerous international countries have followed her lead in establishing universal infant hearing screening programs. Continue reading

Plural Sponsors Communication Sciences and Disorders Library in China

Angie Singh, Plural Publishing CEO and President, has donated a collection of voice and communication sciences and disorders books to the Jinan University in China in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh. Dr. Singh, founder of Plural Publishing, Inc. was an an esteemed international leader in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

Donation plaque

Plural’s donation is in recognition of the collaboration between Jinan University and Ohio University in promoting the field of communication sciences and disorders in China.

Plural's collection of communication sciences and disorders books at Jinan University Library in China (2014).

Plural’s collection of communication sciences and disorders books at Jinan University Library in China (2014).

Continue reading

Reflections on 10 years at Plural

An interview with Plural President, Angie Singh

Angie Singh

Angie Singh, Plural Publishing’s President

What is your favorite moment in Plural’s history?

“My favorite moment occurred before Plural was incorporated. Some of the things we had most valued and had come to miss most in the ten years after the sale of Singular [the Singh’s previous publishing house] were the close relationships, daily interactions and sense of purpose and commitment that we had shared with our authors.

One day, I received a call from longtime friend and Singular author Dr. Robert Sataloff, who suggested that we should start a new company. The idea intrigued my beloved husband and me but it also presented us with many challenges and concerns that included financial investment and the extraordinary time commitments that would alter and affect our lifestyle, especially with our eight year old twins.

We managed to overcome the most serious of concerns and embarked on a journey that became Plural Publishing. We were immediately pleased to learn that many of our past authors were eager to join us in the new venture. Ten years after founding Plural, I couldn’t be more gratified.” Continue reading