Book Review: Auditory-Verbal Therapy reviewed by Helen M. Morrison, Ph.D., CCC/A, LSLS Cert. AVT

AVT book - artwork -v8

Auditory-Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them, by Warren Estabrooks, Karen MacIver-Lux and Ellen A. Rhoades, Plural Publishing, 2016.

Reviewed by Helen M. Morrison, Ph.D., CCC/A, LSLS Cert. AVT

 

 

 

Auditory-Verbal Therapy provides a thorough, 21st century resource for professionals, families, and students. Each chapter is organized in a way that technical information is accompanied by suggestions for practical application, making it a likely “go-to” reference that will be consulted frequently.

The history of Auditory-Verbal therapy (AVT) described in the first chapter is comprehensive and much needed in order to ensure that the story of the approach is not lost to current and future generations of professionals and families. The book is clear about the principles of AVT, what it is and is not, all while demonstrating how AV therapy has evolved to apply evidence-based practices that meet the needs of today’s diverse families and children.

A highlight of the book is a systematic review of literature concerning AVT that utilizes the most current techniques and standards for scientific rigor to describe the state of evidence supporting the approach. The chapters that address audiological procedures and hearing technology are current and provide a basis for deeper reading of the topics discussed. The book addresses each of the knowledge domains that Auditory-Verbal therapists apply in practice, including comprehensive developmental milestones, emergent literacy, inclusion and specific strategies for parent coaching.

An important section of this book provides a rationale and framework for planning and implementing AVT sessions, followed by a series of case studies and lesson plans written by experienced AV therapists that apply this framework. The children and families in these case studies and lessons represent a range of ages, diagnoses, additional disabilities, and cultural/economic situations. The lesson plans at first glance may not seem like conventional lesson plans. They illustrate how important teaching within the conversational context is in AVT, beginning with initial greetings and entering the therapy room or home. Following the child’s lead and exploiting teachable moments are highlighted.

Finally, families from across the global community tell their own stories, demonstrating the universality of the approach. The families not only hail from many different countries, but they are each unique in their cultural and economic situations, types of hearing loss and the ages at which their children entered AVT. Many of the children in these families have challenges in addition to hearing loss.

This book is a must-have for anyone who works with children with hearing loss and their families. The information has value for professionals and families across the communication options that families might choose. This book is essential for professionals working to attain Listening and Spoken Language Specialist certification. It will guide their learning during their certification period and serve as a foundational source for examination preparation.

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