Auditory-Verbal Therapy- Hearing, Listening, Talking, Thinking

Warren_Estabrooks

 

 

By Warren Estabrooks, M.Ed., Dip. Ed. Deaf, LSLS Cert. AVT, co-author of Auditory-Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them

 

 

Globally, there is a great shift towards listening and spoken language for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

Amazing auditory options, state-of-the-art hearing aids, and a variety of implantable hearing devices and the pursuit of excellent (re)habilitation by highly qualified practitioners working in partnerships with families, will hopefully become the standard of international health care and educational intervention for children with hearing loss around the world.

It is the work of therapists, teachers, audiologists, surgeons, social workers, and allied practitioners in health care and education to guide, navigate, and coach parents on their search for the treasure chest of spoken communication—to help them help their children discover the valued jewels of hearing, listening, and spoken conversation.  Practitioners everywhere form alliances of hope and trust with parents, and together we polish these precious gems until they sparkle and dance with life.

Why would one ever consider compromising when so much is possible?

We hope that one day we will look back and see an abundance of evidence-based outcomes, all barriers to equitable service gone, and a global focus on literacy with a deep understanding of powerful auditory access to the brain provided by state-of-the-art hearing technologies.

Renaissance man and mentor of many of today’s auditory-verbal practitioners, Dr. Daniel Ling, wrote that “auditory-verbal therapy… developed as a result of the natural outcomes of advances in knowledge, skills and technology.  As such advances occurred, new treatment strategies were devised to maximize their applications”.

Auditory-Verbal Therapy is now widely accepted because more children are acquiring, or have already acquired, the abilities to use spoken language, to interact more freely with other members of society, to obtain higher levels of academic education, and to have a more extensive range of careers, a greater security of employment and fewer limitations on the personal and social aspects of their lives” (Estabrooks, 2006).

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Insight into the Significance of Supporting Caregivers from Dr. Payne’s New Book

Joan_Payne Payne_SFC

By Joan C. Payne, PhD

Author of the new Supporting Family Caregivers of Adults With Communication Disorders: A Resource Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists

In the United States, there are nearly 44,443, 800 family caregivers over the age of 18 who are caring for someone aged 50 years and older (Alzheimer’s Association, 2011; National Alliance of Caregivers in collaboration with AARP, 2009). Family, or informal, caregivers are family members and friends who provide unpaid care and advocacy for a chronically ill or disabled person for 20 hours a week or more. As such, family caregivers are the nexus between the formal health care system and the community for many individuals. Family caregivers, also called informal caregivers as opposed to those who are paid to render care, are vital extensions of the health care system. Without them, many persons discharged from acute and rehabilitative hospitals would not be able to care for themselves. The efforts of family caregivers are so important to the health, positive mental outlook, and indeed, survival of care recipients that their services are invaluable and predicted to be needed more and more as the 21st century continues.

This is why I am so excited about my book! Supporting Family Caregivers of Adult with Communication Disorders. A Resource Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists represents the first time that caregiver issues and resources have been organized and put in one place for the benefit of health professionals and the families of their patients. Much of my passion for the topic of caregivers comes from my remembering how stressful caregiving was because I really did not know what to do 20 years ago even though I had advanced degrees in speech-language pathology. The purpose of putting this information in one place where it is readily accessible is to empower speech-language pathologists and audiologists and other health professionals to support family caregivers of adults with disorders of communication and swallowing.

Caregiving is a deeply personal and intensive enterprise. Many caregivers report that they have appreciated the time to forge more intimate and caring relationships with their loved ones. At the same time, a significant body of research indicates that caregiving is also costly in terms of time, effort and financial sacrifice. Many caregivers are placed in the primary role of helping others without adequate resources with which to provide the best care. Caregiving can be so stressful that caregivers can themselves develop diseases and disabling conditions which affect their caregiving and those who depend upon them. For some, the stress can be so crippling that some caregivers are forced to abandon providing care altogether, or they become terminally ill.

To that end, each chapter addresses the issues of caregiving of adults with communication and swallowing disorders. Chapter 2 gives an overview of statistics on family caregivers, caregiver responsibilities for care, the economics of family caregiving, and concepts of caregiver burden, strain and stress. In addition, information on the effects of caregiving on physical, mental and emotional health of those who provide care is also provided. Caregiving has been recognized as an important national resource. There are laws that protect and support caregivers at the local and national levels, and Chapter 2 also includes national and state legislation that supports family caregivers when they deliver care. Chapter 3 describes the diversity of caregivers and how culture and tradition prescribe who will care for disabled adults as well as how caregivers use both internal and external resources. There are important differences in how caregivers perceive and accept caregiving responsibilities across ethnic and cultural groups. These differences have implications for how caregivers manage when the responsibilities becomes stressful. There are also some differences in how caregivers may accept and comply with counseling and referrals. Chapter 4 discusses basic characteristics of various brain-based diseases and disorders that affect communication and swallowing with a focus on how these disabling conditions affect communication and swallowing disorders and to assist caregivers in minimizing communication breakdowns.

Chapter 5 is developed from the perspective of audiologists and includes basic information on hearing loss, auditory processing disorders, balance disorders, cochlear implants and hearing aids, as well as the impact on caregivers. Included in this chapter is information on helping caregivers with hearing aid upkeep. A major portion of the chapter is devoted to assistive and augmentative technologies which audiologists can use to educate caregivers of adults with hearing loss who can benefit from these devices. Perceptions of burden, strain and stress interfere with a caregiver’s ability to provide quality and sustained care.

Chapter 6 describes assessments that measure caregiver strain, burden, stress and coping with caring responsibilities. Chapter 7 introduces concepts of education and counseling caregivers within the clinical setting and within the scope of practice. Educating and training caregivers can be helpful in improving communication and providing a continuum of therapy outside of the clinical setting. Although speech-language pathologists do not provide counseling in many areas of need, resource information is provided that can be shared with caregivers that will empower them to find answers to their most important questions, like respite or hospice care, elder law, and insurance. Chapter 8 provides information on other health care professionals and their areas of expertise. It is designed to inform speech-language pathologists and audiologists about the most appropriate professionals to whom caregivers should be referred when they need counseling in specific areas outside of the scope of practice.

Chapter 9, the final chapter, describes a case of a newly-wed husband who suffers a stroke and how his stroke affects his wife and their relationship. Without support from health professionals, his wife flounders in her caregiving role. Their story ends tragically, but questions are presented to guide clinicians to avoid missing caregiver needs.

It is hoped that this book will serve as a resource for health professionals and students in speech-language pathology and audiology and that it will become part of the toolkit for assisting caregivers. It is also the intent that this resource book will be helpful to those who are involved in caregiving now and in the future.

References

Alzheimer’s Association (2011). Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Retrieved from http://www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2011.pdf

National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP (2009). Caregiving in the U.S. Retrieved from http://www.caregiving.org/data/Caregiving_in_the_US_2009_full_report.pdf

About the Author

Joan C. Payne, PhD, is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and is a professor of communication disorders at Howard University in Washington, DC, where she has been a member of the faculty for more than 40 years. She is nationally and internationally recognized for her work in neurogenic language disorders from an ethnobiological perspective and is the 2014 recipient of the Scholar-Mentor Award from the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing.

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Novice to Expert Clinician

By John McCarthy, PhD, CCC-SLP and Aimee Dietz, PhD, CCC-SLP

Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication by John McCarthy and Aimee Dietz

Understanding the personal story of an individual who uses augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can have a positive impact on the attitudes of people without disabilities toward that individual (McCarthy, Donofrio-Horwitz, & Smucker, 2010). Almost any AAC specialist has story after story of moments when they have helped reveal the true abilities of an individual through AAC:

• The eight-year-old boy with cerebral palsy who everyone assumed had below average intellectual ability and presymbolic language skills, was in fact bilingual.
• The forty-year-old woman with bulbar onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who cannot dress or feed herself, but still manages her finances, parents her children, and makes end-of-life decisions.
• The eighteen-year-old girl with autism spectrum disorder whose potential to contribute to society was doubted, yet planned for employment after high school and managed a new mobile device-based communication system.
• The fifty-two-year-old man with stroke-induced aphasia who medical staff assumed was “incompetent”; however, still made informed decisions about medical care and enjoyed friendly banter on the golf course with his adult sons.  Continue reading

Bollywood comes to San Diego to raise money for the ASHFoundation

Angie making dinner at ASHFoundation fundraiser

Angie making dinner at ASHFoundation fundraiser

This past Saturday, June 7th, Plural President and CEO Angie Singh hosted a “Bollywood”-themed fundraiser at her home in La Jolla, CA, with proceeds benefiting the ASHFoundation. Created in 1946 by a visionary leader in the field of communication sciences, Wendell Johnson, the ASHFoundation is a charitable organization that supports the advancement of knowledge in this field and seeks to improve the lives of people with speech, language, or hearing disorders. Continue reading

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month

Better Speech and Hearing Month

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month (BSHM). It has been organized by the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) in order to increase awareness “about communication disorders and to promote treatment that can improve the quality of life for those who experience problems with speaking, understanding, or hearing.”

ASHA’s website has many resources to help you celebrate BHSM. Here are a few:

Child Language – Development and Disorders

We are pleased to bring you details about three publications to meet your teaching needs in child language. From development to acquired language disorders, these titles bring you the best in modern assessment and treatment practice – including issues ranging from neuropathology to TBI to oncology – all from outstanding authors. Click here for more details and to order your copies today!

 

 

Bruce Murdoch’s Handbook of Acquired Communication Disorders in Childhood provides comprehensive coverage of acquired motor speech and language disorders occurring in children in terms of their neuropathological basis, neurology, clinical symptomatology, prognosis, assessment, and treatment. Click here to order your copy!

Cognitive Communication Disorders

We are delighted to introduce you to Michael Kimbarow’s Cognitive Communication Disorders.
A team of expert contributors addresses all aspects of cognitive processes, from normal functioning to deficits such as executive functioning, though Alzheimer’s to TBI, which may affect communication.

 

For this and other resources on cognitive processes, click here!

New Parkinson Reference

We are proud to bring you details of Deborah Theodoros and Lorraine Ramig’s new book, Communication and Swallowing in Parkinson Disease.

 

It is the first to focus specifically on the debilitating speech, cognitive-linguistic, and swallowing disorders associated with Parkinson disease – as well as two other modern classics in neurogenic communication disorders.

We have also added details of The Brain, an amazing teaching and client education software resource that uses 70 animations to detail and explain cranial nerves, pathways, and tracts, including 32 rollover descriptions covering surface and internal anatomy and cranial nerves.

Click here to view this text as well as a few other fantastic resources!

 

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New Release!

Karyn Lewis Searcy’s new book Here’s How to do Early Intervention for Speech and Language has just been released!

 

Here’s How to Do Early Intervention for Speech and Language helps early interventionists develop approaches that jump-start the communication process, strengthen parent confidence, and promote healthier parent-child relationships.

Order your copy today!

 

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