Finally, a coding and reimbursement book written specifically for audiologists, otolaryngologists, academic institutions, and staff!

By Debra Abel, AuD, editor of The Essential Guide to Coding in Audiology: Coding, Billing, and Practice Management

The Essential Guide to Coding in Audiology: Coding, Billing, and Practice Management is that necessary and essential one stop shop office resource for coding, billing, and compliance written specifically for independent audiologists and their office staffs, for otolaryngologists and their office staffs, and for academic programs, with information contained in one repository that has been historically scattered in other places. This book includes many contemporary topics including the critical tools, codes (CPT, ICD-10-CM, and HCPCS) and guidelines necessary for compliant audiology billing, reimbursement, and payment. Medicare, considered the gold standard by most commercial payers, has an entire chapter devoted to those requirements applicable to the audiologist, often an anomaly in payer policies when compared to other health care professions.

The basic tools don’t end there. With an increase in commercial insurance third-party payers and third-party administrators, those payers often don’t speak the same language as the audiologist, which can lead to confusion and heartburn. Kim Cavitt, AuD, a nationally known audiology coding and reimbursement expert, offers a chapter on insurance that includes a glossary of terms and processes for negotiating if you choose to successfully incorporate these commercial payers into your practice. Stephanie Sjoblad, AuD, a pioneer and expert in successful itemization for hearing aid services in her university clinic that functions as a private practice, brings over 10 years of how-to’s to successfully itemize in your own practice. For those practices considering a transition to this process, this chapter will be a major guiding force. Kim Pollock, another nationally known coding and reimbursement consultant, offers a chapter on managing your revenue, something not usually provided specifically to audiologists in a written format, by one of the most knowledgeable sources who has performed audits and risk management for otolaryngology/audiology practices for many years. The final contributor, Doug Lewis, PhD, JD, MBA, an audiologist with significant credentials, has a chapter on the federal regulations that impact the practice of audiology, a compendium of all those requirements essential to maintaining compliance while offering services. Finally, the concluding chapter is a checklist of the fundamentals and the components needed when one considers and establishes a private practice.

Apart from the chapter devoted to revenue, each data-driven chapter on coding, reimbursement, and compliance, was written by audiologists for audiologists, unprecedented at the time of publication. This is a necessary resource for every audiology office and academic program!