Book Review: Auditory Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them

AVT book - artwork -v8

Reviewed by Estelle Roberts, Speech-Language Therapist, Jhb Cochlear Implant Programme, Johannesburg, South Africa

Advances in technology have increasingly cast a spotlight on the possibilities for children with hearing loss, however severe, to learn to listen and use spoken language as their preferred mode of communication.   Auditory Verbal Therapy (AVT) has gained prominence as the intervention of choice for these families and their practitioners.  Auditory Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them provides a current, comprehensive and evidence-based text with appeal for a broad spectrum of professionals. The editors’ global experience reflects in, and influences the text, as does the work of 29 contributors, all international experts in their fields.

This is a substantive book:  seventeen chapters spanning 600 pages.  While this might initially seem daunting, the text makes for absorbing reading.  Much of the information is presented to encourage a fresh look at familiar topics. Throughout the text, the latest thinking and research is applied to AVT. In Chapter 2, hearing and listening are naturally paired with thinking and its accompanying research.  In Chapter 8, extensive and relevant information covering auditory processing, speech, language, emergent literacy and play is linked to developmental scales to provide diagnostic guidelines for practitioners.  Chapter 9 explores emergent literacy and provides compelling data that highlights the importance of early and effective access to sound for infants with hearing loss.  Very topically, it includes a balanced perspective on digital literacy.  For students and practitioners seeking practical knowledge in skill development, there are a number of ‘How to…’ chapters that have the potential to be used as ‘templates’ for acquiring skills or refining professional practice.

Unlike most texts, where the emphasis is directed at a particular group of practitioners, this inclusive text speaks to a broader audience within the field.  The material presented in chapters 4 – 7, covering audiology, hearing aids, implantable hearing technologies and assistive and access technologies, balances the next chapters, which provide greater depth for Auditory Verbal practitioners in particular. This balance between depth and breadth creates a must-have reference for the broader professional community interacting with cochlear implants.

The final chapter presents the voices of families from twelve countries as they reflect on their journeys with their children with hearing loss. Their reports, told from this powerful perspective, bear touching and convincing testimony to the global reach of AVT.

The lay-out of the book contributes to an ease of understanding that would be appreciated by parents, students and others not wholly familiar with the field.  Generous spacing, bulleting and frequently highlighted sub-sections creates a navigable reading experience and serves as a useful reference for those who prefer to use the text as a ‘dip-in’ resource.

Given its broad appeal to professionals and families, its presentation of extensive current, researched information and practical application to AVT, as well as its easy navigability, this resource may well replace existing texts to become the favoured ‘go-to’ resource for practitioners, students, families and the broader CI community seeking exploration and guidance in the field of AVT.