Auditory-Verbal Therapy- Hearing, Listening, Talking, Thinking

Warren_Estabrooks

 

 

By Warren Estabrooks, M.Ed., Dip. Ed. Deaf, LSLS Cert. AVT, co-author of Auditory-Verbal Therapy: For Young Children with Hearing Loss and Their Families, and the Practitioners Who Guide Them

 

 

Globally, there is a great shift towards listening and spoken language for children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

Amazing auditory options, state-of-the-art hearing aids, and a variety of implantable hearing devices and the pursuit of excellent (re)habilitation by highly qualified practitioners working in partnerships with families, will hopefully become the standard of international health care and educational intervention for children with hearing loss around the world.

It is the work of therapists, teachers, audiologists, surgeons, social workers, and allied practitioners in health care and education to guide, navigate, and coach parents on their search for the treasure chest of spoken communication—to help them help their children discover the valued jewels of hearing, listening, and spoken conversation.  Practitioners everywhere form alliances of hope and trust with parents, and together we polish these precious gems until they sparkle and dance with life.

Why would one ever consider compromising when so much is possible?

We hope that one day we will look back and see an abundance of evidence-based outcomes, all barriers to equitable service gone, and a global focus on literacy with a deep understanding of powerful auditory access to the brain provided by state-of-the-art hearing technologies.

Renaissance man and mentor of many of today’s auditory-verbal practitioners, Dr. Daniel Ling, wrote that “auditory-verbal therapy… developed as a result of the natural outcomes of advances in knowledge, skills and technology.  As such advances occurred, new treatment strategies were devised to maximize their applications”.

Auditory-Verbal Therapy is now widely accepted because more children are acquiring, or have already acquired, the abilities to use spoken language, to interact more freely with other members of society, to obtain higher levels of academic education, and to have a more extensive range of careers, a greater security of employment and fewer limitations on the personal and social aspects of their lives” (Estabrooks, 2006).

Continue reading

AudiologyNOW! 2016 Author Signing Schedule

AudiologyNOW! attendees – Meet our authors and connect with experts in the field! Stop by the Plural booth (#301) for the following Meet the Author sessions: 


Thursday, April 14, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Meet Marc Fagelson, BA, MS, PhD 
Co-editor of Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives

Marc Fagelson   Tinnitus


Thursday, April 14, 3:00 – 3:30 pm
Meet Mark DeRuiter, MBA, PhD and Virginia Ramachandran, AuD, PhD
Authors of Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition 

Mark DeRuiter   Virginia Ramachandran   Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition


Friday, April 15, 11:00 – 11:30 am
Meet Ruth Bentler, PhD, H. Gustav Mueller, PhD, and Todd A. Ricketts, PhD
Authors of Modern Hearing Aids: Verification, Outcome Measures, and Follow-Up  

Ruth Bentler   H. Gustav Mueller   Todd A. Ricketts  Bentler_MHA.jpg

Congratulations to Ruth Bentler, 2016 recipient of the Jerger Award for Research in Audiology. 


Friday, April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Meet Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD
Co-editor of Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology, Second Edition

Anne Marie Tharpe   Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology

Congratulations to Anne Marie Tharpe, 2016 recipient of the Marion Downs Award for Excellence in Pediatric Audiology. 

2016 Awards and Honors

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2016 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh, Plural’s founder. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and the honorees and their faculty sponsors will be acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting award banquet, in San Antonio, TX on March 31.

At the MS/AuD level, the award went to Chelsea Hull of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Working with advisor Dr. Sherri Jones, Chelsea is researching the impact of Sound Field Amplification (SFA) devices, specifically the REDCAT amplification system, on student academic outcomes and teacher perspectives of this amplification system on academic improvement.

CAPCSD Scholarship Chelsea Hull

Chelsea Hull                                                         Au.D. Student                                             University of Nebraska-Lincoln

At the PhD level, the award was given to Nancy Quick of the University of North Carolina. Under advisor Dr. Melody Harrison, the focus of Nancy’s research is on investigating the impact of underlying linguistic sources of knowledge on spelling among children with hearing aids, cochlear implants and normal hearing, utilizing a multilinguistic analytic approach.

CAPCSD Scholarship Nancy Quick

Nancy Quick, M.S. CCC-SLP               University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill PhD Candidate in Speech and Hearing Sciences, Class of 2017

Congratulations Chelsea and Nancy on your achievements!


Continue reading

Tinnitus: In the Brain of the Beholder

Marc_Fagelson    Baguley_PTINN    David_Baguley

 

By: Marc Fagelson, BA, MS, PhD and David M. Baguley, BSc, MSc, MBA, PhD

Co-editors of Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives

Most audiologists and patients understand tinnitus to be the perception of a sound that is not connected in any way to an environmental event. For some patients, the sound produces minimal discomfort and is noticeable only a fraction of the time. Other patients are not so fortunate, and their tinnitus may persist and prove distracting when they are in the presence of other sounds or when they try to communicate. A relatively small proportion of patients with tinnitus, still probably more than 10 million people worldwide, have bothersome tinnitus that consistently reduces their quality of life and affects most routine activities. Such patients often respond to tinnitus as though its presence merits the attention and concern consistent with that demanded by a sound that is recognized as a threat. These patients illustrate some of the more confounding elements of tinnitus: it is a sound experience that may produce, or be associated with, powerful emotions and physiologic responses consistent with those demonstrated in fear-avoidance research.

A person’s experience with tinnitus may be complex and multi-faceted. Some patients link tinnitus to traumatic events, perhaps those that triggered the tinnitus onset. Other patients report psychological conditions such as anxiety and depression appear to exacerbate tinnitus and may be reinforced by tinnitus-related negative associations. Often, tinnitus severity is dictated not by the sound, but by the patient’s interpretation of and response to the sound. In this regard, the power of tinnitus to exert influence over a person’s life is in the eye, or ear, of the beholder.

Tinnitus interventions, then, may be viewed as proceeding along parallel tracks: abolishing or attenuating the sound may be the target of a treatment strategy, or the patient’s response to tinnitus may be the target of a management strategy. Both approaches are considered in detail, and with many examples, in Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives. Continue reading

Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder Reviewed

Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder, Volume 1, 2nd Edition

Peer review of Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder: Auditory Neuroscience and Diagnosis, Volume I, Second Edition edited by Frank Musiek, PhD, CCC-A and Gail Chermak, PhD, CCC-A.

Review by Herbert Jay Gould, PhD, Associate Professor, School Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Memphis

The addition of several new chapters to the Handbook of Auditory Processing Disorders Volume 1 is a significant enhancement and expansion of the first edition. The general layout and writing is consistently high quality throughout the book. Several chapters and areas of discussion are particularly valuable to the reader’s basic understanding of CAPD.

The initial section on auditory neuroscience has excellent chapters by Jos Eggermont on central auditory system development and by Phillips on central auditory neuroscience. These two chapters provide a strong basic science underpinning to the remainder of the book. Dr. Eggermont’s chapter ties the anatomic and electrophysiologic activity of the system to the normal behavioral measures of basic signal processing and speech perception of the developing nervous system. The extraordinarily long time course of this system’s maturation exemplifies the difficulties of separating a slowly maturing, but normal system, from a significantly disordered one. Continue reading

Ten Advances in Cochlear Implant Technology and Services

By: Jace Wolfe, PhD

Over the past several years, there have been numerous advances in cochlear implant technology and services. As recent as a decade ago, there were little to no technological solutions available to assist a cochlear implant candidate/recipient, who presented with severe to profound hearing loss, with speech recognition in difficult listening situations—understanding speech in noisy and reverberant settings, over the telephone or television, and when spoken from a distance. Today, cochlear implant manufacturers offer a wide variety of solutions to meet the needs of patients with hearing aids or cochlear implant processors who struggle to communicate. This article identifies ten ways in which cochlear implant technology and services have evolved and improved in the past few years.

10. Automatic scene classification: Hearing aids have featured acoustic scene classifiers for almost a decade. Through these systems, hearing aids classify an environment as one that possesses background noise, speech in quiet or in noise, music, wind, and so forth. Once the listening situation is classified into one of these environments, the hearing aid selects the appropriate form of signal processing that will theoretically optimize performance in the given environment. This technology can be quite valuable as many users are unlikely to manually switch to programs designed for specific, challenging situations. Furthermore, this system will likely be well-received by cochlear implant users as it makes its way to implant sound processors.

9. The development of new speech recognition materials that provide a more realistic assessment of how hearing aid and implant users perform in real-life listening situations: Cochlear implant technology has improved so much that many users score near 100% correct on sentence recognition tests in a quiet environment with a single talker who is male and speaks at a slow to moderate rate. Additionally, many hearing aid users who struggle substantially in realistic situations also often score too well on these tests to meet the indications for cochlear implant candidacy. This fact makes it difficult to distinguish between excellent implant and hearing aid users and good users who may benefit from additional services.

Continue reading

Plural Authors Receive 2013 ASHA Awards

Each year, for over 70 years the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has recognized and awarded many deserving individuals for their dedication and contributions to the professions of speech-language, pathology, audiology and speech and hearing science. We would like to congratulate and highlight our authors who were honored with awards this year’s ASHA convention in Chicago.

The highest honor ASHA bestows upon its members is the Honors of the Association. Individuals recognized at this level have, “enhanced or altered the course of the professions”. We are so proud to say that Plural’s own CEO and co-founder, Dr. Sadanand Singh was recognized at this level. This year several of our authors received the Honors of the Association for their pioneering work:

  • Dr. Maurice H. Miller, NYU Steinhardt, was recognized this year for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of audiology”. Dr. Miller is Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology and was voted Professor of the Year at NYU. He is the author of Hearing Disorder Handbook, a practical, concise and time-saving text that provides comprehensive, reliable and accurate descriptions of auditory and vestibular disorders, their frequency of occurrence, etiology, diagnosis, and management – all in a single resource.
  • Dr. Robert J. Shprintzen, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, was recognized for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Shprintzen is a found member of the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc. and is a professor and director of several programs at New York Upstate Medical University. He is the author of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, volumes I and II. This comprehensive two-volume set combines text and video demonstrating the clinical features, communication phenotype and the natural history of speech and language of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS).
  • Dr. Cynthia K. Thompson, Northwestern University, was recognized this year for her “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Thompson is a professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology. She is also an ASHA fellow and recipient of the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern. She is the author of Aphasia Rehabilitation, a unique text that specifically contrasts impairment- and consequences- focused treatment with the aim of providing clinicians with a level playing field that permits them to evaluate for themselves the relative contributions that each approach provides.

The ASHA Committee on Honors awards the Fellowship of the Association to individuals who have “made outstanding contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders”. This year many of our authors were bestowed this honor:

  • Dr. Maria Adelaida Restrepo, Arizona State University, was recognized for her teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Restrpo is an Associate Professor and director of the Bilingual Language and Literacy Laboratory at ASU. She is a certified member of ASHA and author of Improving the Vocabulary and Oral Language Skills of Bilingual Latino Preschoolers.
  • Dr. Ronald C. Scherer, Bowling Green State University, was recognized for his teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Scherer is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Bowling Green State University. He is the author of Speaking and Singing on Stage.
  • Dr. Rahul Shrivstav, Michigan State University, was recognized for his administrative service, research and publications and service to state associations. He is the chair of Michigan State University’s department of communicative sciences and disorders. He has served as an Associate Editor for many scientific journals and is one of our consulting editors.
  • Dr. Anne van Kleeck, University of Texas at Dallas, was recognized for her teaching, administrative service and research and publications. She is professor and Callier Research Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of Sharing Books and Stories to Promote Language and Literacy.
  • Dr. Barbara Derickson Weinrich, Miami University, was recognized for her clinical service, teaching and research and publications. She is a professor at Miami University and Research Associate for the Cincinnait Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She is the author of Vocal Hygiene as well as the forthcoming text, Pediatric Voice.
  • Dr. Edwin M.L. Yiu, University of Hong Kong, was recognized for his teaching, administrative service and research and publications. He is a professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, He is the founder of the Voice Research Laboratory and holds and Honorary Professorship at the University of Sydney. He is also the author of Handbook of Voice Assessments.

The Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in International Achievement recognizes “distinguished achievements and significant contributions in the areas of communication disorders revealing great international impact from their work”. This year Plural author, Dr. Brooke Hallowell, Ohio University, received this award. Dr. Hallowell is the president of the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is the author of two forthcoming Plural books.

The Certificate of Recognition for Special contributions in Multicultural Affairs recognizes “recent distinguished achievement and contributions by ASHA members in the area of multicultural professional education and research, and clinical service to multicultural population”. This year Plural author, Dr. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, California State University Sacramento, received this award. Dr. Rosberry-McKibbin is a professor of speech pathology and audiology and is an ASHA Fellow. She is the author of Increasing Language Skills of Students from Low-Income Backgrounds.

Plural author, Dr. Audrey L. Holland, University of Arizona, was awarded the 2013 Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award in honor of her “exemplary contributions to science and practice”. Dr. Holland is a core member of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasisa movement and Regents’ Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the University of Arizona. She is the co-author of Counseling in Communication Disorders, now in its second edition.

Every year the editors and associate editors of ASHA journals “select an article they feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact”. This year Plural author, Dr. Lorraine O. Ramig’s article “Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Parkinson Disease” published in volume 21 of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, was chosen to receive an Editors’ Award this year.

Congratulations to all the ASHA awardees and special thanks to the great work produced by our award-winning authors!

Guest Post: 4 Types of Hearing Tests You Should Consider

Our guest post this week comes from HEARING Life Australia and explains the benefits and uses of different types of hearing tests. The intention is to share this with your patients to help simplify the complexities in such a way that anyone can understand.

-Plural Team

 4 Types of Hearing Tests You Should Consider

conversationIf you often find yourself asking your loved ones to repeat themselves, find it difficult to follow conversations, or receive frequent complaints that you talk too loudly, it may be time to book a hearing test at your local hearing clinic.

Hearing tests employ a range of technologies that can determine your level of hearing impairment and whether you need to invest in a hearing aid. But with so many hearing tests available, it’s important to know which one is right for you.

Consider the following types of hearing tests:   

         1. Pure-Tone Testing

This hearing test will reveal the faintest tones a person can hear at various frequencies, from low to high. This test involves an audiometer machine emitting a range of beeps and whistles, called pure tones, with the participant responding to each sound.

When taking the pure-tone test, the participant may be asked to respond to the sounds through raising a finger or hand, pressing a button, or vocally affirming to indicate that a sound was heard.

The results of the test are plotted on an audiogram, a graph that charts the degree and type of hearing loss.

Pure-tone testing is a behavioral measurement that relies on patient reaction, and therefore is best performed on adults and children mature enough to cooperate with the test procedure.

         2. Speech Discrimination Tests

These tests involve an audiologist assessing the participants’ ability to hear speech, with the results also recorded on an audiogram. These tests may involve the participant having to repeat words that are said to them.

Hearing loss that comes with aging generally begins with individuals losing the ability to hear higher frequencies, so that certain speech sounds begin to sound confusingly similar. A speech test can measure the amount of experienced speech distortion.

In order to assess the participants ability to understand speech with background noise, speech testing may be conducted in a quiet or noisy environment. This test is typically used on older children and adults, and may be used to confirm the results of the pure-tone test.

         3. Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR)

The ABR test provides information about the inner ear (cochlea) and the brain pathways required for hearing. For this test, electrodes are connected to the head in order to monitor the brain’s response to sounds. The participant lays still or even sleeps during the test.

This test can be performed on children, or those that might have difficulty with more typical behavioural methods of hearing loss tests.

         4. Online Hearing Tests

For an initial assessment at home, taking an online hearing test is a great way find out whether someone should seek further professional assistance. While an online hearing test is not intended to replace a hearing assessment with an experienced hearing care professional, it may assist in identifying whether hearing loss is an issue.

In order to undertake an online hearing test at home, it is necessary to have Internet access with the ability to stream sounds, as well as a pair of headphones. Before starting, it is important to check that the computer volume is on and that the surrounding environment is quiet.

Online hearing tests may consist of different components, such as an audio screening which will test the respondents’ ability to hear sounds. An online test may also include questions that require honest answers regarding the person’s hearing ability. These tests will typically generate a score or recommendation that can be used as the starting point to assessing hearing health.


About the Author:

hearinglifeThis post was written by HEARINGLife Australia, one of the world’s leading networks of hearing care professionals. HEARINGLife has provided hearing services to Australians for over 70 years.

HEARINGLife aims to provide sufficient information about hearing loss, hearing aids and hearing tests by providing independent advice and to provide customers with options in a way that is easily understandable. More information can be obtained from HEARINGLife’s website and social media profiles: Google Plus | Facebook  | Twitter

 

Looking Inside the Bionic Ear

shell2Dr. Graeme Clark explains of the bionic ear that the challenge was to put the wire around the inner ear which is only about 2-3 cm in diameter. Dr. Graeme got the idea to curl the wire from shells’ spirals and found that in this way a wire could go around the inner ear if it was bendable and flexible enough. This led them to designing the first prototype from the University of Melbourne; along with the electronics, which had to be reduced to match the size of the silicone tubes.

The bionic ear cochlear implant works by having an outside speech processor with a microphone and an imbedded receiver stimulator which stimulates the hearing. When one speaks the microphone picks up the sound waves, sends them through the speech processor which converts this into patterns of electrical signals which are then sent by radio waves through the skin to the implant. Then the implant stimulates the wires around the inner ear. This is the process by which a deaf person is able to hear. Listen to Dr. Graeme Clark explain this process.

Graeme Clark and Rod Saunders“There were many times during the early stages of my involvement with the bionic ear that I could have given up, but didn’t. In spite of problems, criticisms and difficulties I felt that I just had to go on to explore the possibilities to the very end. Someone had to do it, because it was the only chance that profoundly deaf people could have of being able to hear.” – Professor Graeme Clark AC (http://www.graemeclarkoration.org.au/about-graeme-clark.php)

 

The cochlear implant has evolved significantly due to the persistent innovative work and dedication from various teams and researchers. They have been successfully used since the 1980s.

Just last year, researches at the Tel Aviv University discovered that under certain conditions, bilateral cochlear implants (implants placed in both ears) have the ability to salvage binaural sound processing for the deaf. Learn more about Dr. Henkin’s work.

Guest Post by Melanie Lewis: Hearing Loss

Foreword:

Our guest post this week, by Melaine Lewis with Hearing Direct, explains the details of hearing loss and recommended courses of action.

-Plural Team

HEARING LOSS

EarHearing loss can occur due to a number of reasons, these can be due to changes that the body undergoes (age-related) or more man-made reasons such as exposure to harmful noise. According to Kochkin’s 2008 survey (*MarkeTrak VIII) 35 million Americans are thought to present  the symptoms of impaired hearing and the number is projected to increase to 40 million by 2025.

The biggest group and the subject of this post are the age-related (Presbycusis) hearing loss suffers whose condition is often misunderstood. Many sufferers chose to ‘accept’ diminished hearing as a given fact, though modern healthcare offers means to mange the condition so its influence on daily lives is minimized.

What Is Age-Related Hearing Loss?

Let’s start by explaining what it isn’t. It isn’t a condition that an individual can control like noise induced hearing loss nor does it normally lead to complete hearing loss.

It is a gradual demise in hearing ability known as sensorineural hearing loss. As the body matures, two processes lead to reduced hearing of certain frequencies. The first is degeneration of a part of the inner ear that contains micropscopic blood vessels, while the second process is the decline in sensitive hair cells inside the cochlea (a snail-shell like structure in the inner ear) that gradually become damaged or die due to increases in free radicals that damage certain cells in the body. The body is unable to regrow these hair cells (these are really nerve endings that detect sound) which leads to the categorization of agerelated hearing loss as a permanent one.

ear mechanisms

What Are The Typical Symptoms Of Age-Related Hearing Loss?

The level of hearing loss will vary between individuals. Some will be able to make simple adjustments in their lifestyle to counteract its affects, while in the case of other individuals the deterioration in hearing ability will require the intervention of modern healthcare.

Symptoms and signs can include:

  • Certain sounds seem too loud
  • Difficulty following a group conversation
  • Difficulty hearing in noisy areas
  • Hard to tell high-pitched sounds (such as “s” or “th”) from one another
  • Increased difficulty in understanding women and children
  • Problems hearing when there is background noise
  • Voices that sound mumbled or slurred

What Is The Recommended Course of Action?

If you suspect that you or someone you care for might be experiencing the telltale signs of hearing loss, it should be investigated by your family doctor, local ENT unit or hearing center. Although the most common causes are linked to aging, other causes should also be investigated to be  ruled out.

These may include:

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • Certain infections such as meningitis, mumps, scarlet fever and measles
  • Use of certain medicines
  • Genetic conditions
  • Skull fractures
  • Traumatic noisy events

To eliminate and diagnose the precise cause(s), a hearing test will need to be performed. A basic test can be conducted at your family doctor’s practice, though it is likely that you may also need to book a physical audiometry test at your local ENT or hearing center.

Equipped with the result, your healthcare advisor will be able to recommend the most suitable solution from using ALDs (Assistive Listening Devices such as Hearing Aids) or adapting certain communication techniques. In the case of severe hearing loss, learning sign language and even cochlear implants may form part of the recommended options.

Hearing loss does not have to undermine your quality of life. It can and should be managed.

 

About the Author:

HearingDirectMelanie Lewis is a trained hearing aid audiologist. She works for Hearing Direct, the UK’s biggest supplier of deaf and hard of hearing aids from hearing aid accessories such as batteries to ALDs (Assistive Listening Devices).

 

* The MarkeTrak VIII survey included 80,000 members of the National Family Opinion (NFO) panel. Of these, 14,623 hearing impaired individuals were identified.