AudiologyNOW! 2016 Author Signing Schedule

AudiologyNOW! attendees – Meet our authors and connect with experts in the field! Stop by the Plural booth (#301) for the following Meet the Author sessions: 


Thursday, April 14, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Meet Marc Fagelson, BA, MS, PhD 
Co-editor of Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives

Marc Fagelson   Tinnitus


Thursday, April 14, 3:00 – 3:30 pm
Meet Mark DeRuiter, MBA, PhD and Virginia Ramachandran, AuD, PhD
Authors of Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition 

Mark DeRuiter   Virginia Ramachandran   Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition


Friday, April 15, 11:00 – 11:30 am
Meet Ruth Bentler, PhD, H. Gustav Mueller, PhD, and Todd A. Ricketts, PhD
Authors of Modern Hearing Aids: Verification, Outcome Measures, and Follow-Up  

Ruth Bentler   H. Gustav Mueller   Todd A. Ricketts  Bentler_MHA.jpg

Congratulations to Ruth Bentler, 2016 recipient of the Jerger Award for Research in Audiology. 


Friday, April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Meet Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD
Co-editor of Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology, Second Edition

Anne Marie Tharpe   Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology

Congratulations to Anne Marie Tharpe, 2016 recipient of the Marion Downs Award for Excellence in Pediatric Audiology. 

2016 Awards and Honors

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2016 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh, Plural’s founder. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and the honorees and their faculty sponsors will be acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting award banquet, in San Antonio, TX on March 31.

At the MS/AuD level, the award went to Chelsea Hull of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Working with advisor Dr. Sherri Jones, Chelsea is researching the impact of Sound Field Amplification (SFA) devices, specifically the REDCAT amplification system, on student academic outcomes and teacher perspectives of this amplification system on academic improvement.

CAPCSD Scholarship Chelsea Hull

Chelsea Hull                                                         Au.D. Student                                             University of Nebraska-Lincoln

At the PhD level, the award was given to Nancy Quick of the University of North Carolina. Under advisor Dr. Melody Harrison, the focus of Nancy’s research is on investigating the impact of underlying linguistic sources of knowledge on spelling among children with hearing aids, cochlear implants and normal hearing, utilizing a multilinguistic analytic approach.

CAPCSD Scholarship Nancy Quick

Nancy Quick, M.S. CCC-SLP               University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill PhD Candidate in Speech and Hearing Sciences, Class of 2017

Congratulations Chelsea and Nancy on your achievements!


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Ten Advances in Cochlear Implant Technology and Services

By: Jace Wolfe, PhD

Over the past several years, there have been numerous advances in cochlear implant technology and services. As recent as a decade ago, there were little to no technological solutions available to assist a cochlear implant candidate/recipient, who presented with severe to profound hearing loss, with speech recognition in difficult listening situations—understanding speech in noisy and reverberant settings, over the telephone or television, and when spoken from a distance. Today, cochlear implant manufacturers offer a wide variety of solutions to meet the needs of patients with hearing aids or cochlear implant processors who struggle to communicate. This article identifies ten ways in which cochlear implant technology and services have evolved and improved in the past few years.

10. Automatic scene classification: Hearing aids have featured acoustic scene classifiers for almost a decade. Through these systems, hearing aids classify an environment as one that possesses background noise, speech in quiet or in noise, music, wind, and so forth. Once the listening situation is classified into one of these environments, the hearing aid selects the appropriate form of signal processing that will theoretically optimize performance in the given environment. This technology can be quite valuable as many users are unlikely to manually switch to programs designed for specific, challenging situations. Furthermore, this system will likely be well-received by cochlear implant users as it makes its way to implant sound processors.

9. The development of new speech recognition materials that provide a more realistic assessment of how hearing aid and implant users perform in real-life listening situations: Cochlear implant technology has improved so much that many users score near 100% correct on sentence recognition tests in a quiet environment with a single talker who is male and speaks at a slow to moderate rate. Additionally, many hearing aid users who struggle substantially in realistic situations also often score too well on these tests to meet the indications for cochlear implant candidacy. This fact makes it difficult to distinguish between excellent implant and hearing aid users and good users who may benefit from additional services.

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Guest Post: 4 Types of Hearing Tests You Should Consider

Our guest post this week comes from HEARING Life Australia and explains the benefits and uses of different types of hearing tests. The intention is to share this with your patients to help simplify the complexities in such a way that anyone can understand.

-Plural Team

 4 Types of Hearing Tests You Should Consider

conversationIf you often find yourself asking your loved ones to repeat themselves, find it difficult to follow conversations, or receive frequent complaints that you talk too loudly, it may be time to book a hearing test at your local hearing clinic.

Hearing tests employ a range of technologies that can determine your level of hearing impairment and whether you need to invest in a hearing aid. But with so many hearing tests available, it’s important to know which one is right for you.

Consider the following types of hearing tests:   

         1. Pure-Tone Testing

This hearing test will reveal the faintest tones a person can hear at various frequencies, from low to high. This test involves an audiometer machine emitting a range of beeps and whistles, called pure tones, with the participant responding to each sound.

When taking the pure-tone test, the participant may be asked to respond to the sounds through raising a finger or hand, pressing a button, or vocally affirming to indicate that a sound was heard.

The results of the test are plotted on an audiogram, a graph that charts the degree and type of hearing loss.

Pure-tone testing is a behavioral measurement that relies on patient reaction, and therefore is best performed on adults and children mature enough to cooperate with the test procedure.

         2. Speech Discrimination Tests

These tests involve an audiologist assessing the participants’ ability to hear speech, with the results also recorded on an audiogram. These tests may involve the participant having to repeat words that are said to them.

Hearing loss that comes with aging generally begins with individuals losing the ability to hear higher frequencies, so that certain speech sounds begin to sound confusingly similar. A speech test can measure the amount of experienced speech distortion.

In order to assess the participants ability to understand speech with background noise, speech testing may be conducted in a quiet or noisy environment. This test is typically used on older children and adults, and may be used to confirm the results of the pure-tone test.

         3. Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR)

The ABR test provides information about the inner ear (cochlea) and the brain pathways required for hearing. For this test, electrodes are connected to the head in order to monitor the brain’s response to sounds. The participant lays still or even sleeps during the test.

This test can be performed on children, or those that might have difficulty with more typical behavioural methods of hearing loss tests.

         4. Online Hearing Tests

For an initial assessment at home, taking an online hearing test is a great way find out whether someone should seek further professional assistance. While an online hearing test is not intended to replace a hearing assessment with an experienced hearing care professional, it may assist in identifying whether hearing loss is an issue.

In order to undertake an online hearing test at home, it is necessary to have Internet access with the ability to stream sounds, as well as a pair of headphones. Before starting, it is important to check that the computer volume is on and that the surrounding environment is quiet.

Online hearing tests may consist of different components, such as an audio screening which will test the respondents’ ability to hear sounds. An online test may also include questions that require honest answers regarding the person’s hearing ability. These tests will typically generate a score or recommendation that can be used as the starting point to assessing hearing health.


About the Author:

hearinglifeThis post was written by HEARINGLife Australia, one of the world’s leading networks of hearing care professionals. HEARINGLife has provided hearing services to Australians for over 70 years.

HEARINGLife aims to provide sufficient information about hearing loss, hearing aids and hearing tests by providing independent advice and to provide customers with options in a way that is easily understandable. More information can be obtained from HEARINGLife’s website and social media profiles: Google Plus | Facebook  | Twitter

 

Must-see TV – Audiology is a hot topic this week

Authors_in_the_News

Recently a few of our authors have been on television! They are experts in the field of audiology and we are happy to share their wisdom and success.

Ruth Bentler, PhD was on Charlie Rose’s Brain Series speaking about the brain and hearing. Specifically she detailed some of the history of the hearing aid and the future of hearing loss awareness and acceptance. Just want to see Ruth? Skip to the 20 minute mark.

Brian Taylor, AUD was interviewed on hearing health by Morgan Fairchild for the new show Baby Boomers in America on the LifeTime Network. He discusses the importance of early detection and maintained audiologic care.

New Edition of Children with Hearing Loss

We are pleased to announce the publication of the 2nd edition of the bestselling book, “Children with Hearing Loss: Developing Listening and Talking, Birth to Six.”

This edition includes updated information about hearing instruments and cochlear implants, as well as ways that professionals can support parents in promoting their children’s language and listening development. Information about preschool program selection and management has also been included. The text also features a revised auditory development checklist.

Order your copy today!

New Hearing Aid Textbook Coming Soon!

We’re excited to announce the upcoming publication of “Understanding Hearing Aids: Getting Started,” by Brian Taylor, AuD, and H. Gustav Mueller, PhD.

This introductory textbook will be published in the first part of 2011.  You can pre-order your examination copy today at:

http://www.pluralpublishing.com/publication_uha.htm

Celebrate Hearing Aid Awareness week with us!

Image from Shutterstock

The International Hearing Society has decided that this week, October 3-10, is Hearing Aid Awareness Week! Celebrate the amazing technology of hearing aids with these titles: Digital Hearing Aids, Modern Hearing Aids (forthcoming), and Understanding Hearing Aids (forthcoming). These titles are a great way to understand just how important this exciting and revolutionary field is to changing the lives of those struggling with hearing loss.