Plural joins R2 Digital Library platform

We are pleased to announce that a select number of Plural’s books will now be available for purchase via Rittenhouse Book Distributors’ R2 Digital Library. Visit R2Library.com for the full list of titles currently available.

“The R2 Digital Library is committed to providing highly specialized health sciences content for institutional purchase,” said Jason Hafer, Manager of eContent and ePlatform Support at Rittenhouse. “Plural Publishing’s notable work in a variety of specialized disciplines alone would make them an asset to the platform – that they are also working with us to expand the video collection on R2 adds a great deal of value to the user experience.” Continue reading

Plural Author in the News: Blake Wilson Awarded Lasker Prize

Authors_in_the_NewsOn September 9th of this year, Plural author Dr. Blake Wilson was awarded the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medicine Research Award for his pioneering efforts in cochlear implantation, along with Graeme Clark and Ingeborg Hochmair. Dr. Wilson was chosen to receive the award because he, “oversaw a giant leap forward in speech encoding for implants that ingeniously manipulated the timing and place of stimulation so as to minimize distortion and channel interaction.” 1

Blake WilsonHe is the Co-Director for the Duke Hearing Center and an adjunct professor for the university. He also is Chief Strategy Advisor for MED-EL Medical Electronics GmbH of Innsbruck, Austria and a Senior Fellow Emeritus of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in the Research Triangle Park, NC. He has been involved in the development of the cochlear implant (CI) for the past three decades and is the inventor of many of the signal processing strategies used with the present-day devices. His book Better Hearing with Cochlear Implants: Studies at Research Triangle Institute describes his and Dr. Michael Dorman’s research in more depth.

Current cochlear implants still have limitations in delivering speech signals but are able to distinguish speech in loud noise areas, as well as identify a speaker’s gender. Dr. Wilson and the other awardees contributions to the field have given 300,000 implant recipients the gift of hearing.

1. O’Donoghue, G. Cochlear Implants — Science, Serendipity, and Success. The New England Journal of Medicine, Sept. 9, 2013, doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1310111

 

Feature Article- Preclinical Speech Science: A Cool Stroll through the Forest

Preclinical Speech Science: A Cool Stroll through the Forest
by Gary Weismer & Jeannette Hoit

forest

Every discipline has its “trial by fire” entry-level courses; in the field of speech-language pathology, the speech science course is one of those. Students often see speech science as a walk across the hot coals of anatomy,  physiology, and acoustic output of the speech apparatus.  Our view is that it should be more like a stroll through a beautiful forest, with vegetation and wildlife that is so interesting you can’t help but stop and admire it, ooh and ah over the relationship between structure and function of a plant here, an animal there, and want to remember the details of this new and intricate world because you just know that understanding it will be useful to you in the future.

Preclinical Speech Science, Second EditionThere have been many great speech science textbooks over the years, and almost certainly many more to come.  When we set out to write the first edition of Preclinical Speech Science:  Anatomy, Physiology, Acoustics, Perception, we asked ourselves the question, ‘Why write yet another speech science text?’  Our answer was that we wanted to  1) present the kind of beautiful images, coordinated with easy-to-read, straightforward text, that would make students want to stroll, stopping frequently, through this beautiful forest of knowledge that is the back country of speech-language pathology,  2) expand greatly on the ‘other A&P’ (Acoustics and Perception),  3) update the speech physiology to include contemporary notions about how speech production works, and why it has clear relevance to the speech-language pathologist’s daily practice, 4) include examples of clinical applications of speech science in the forms of clinical scenarios and sidetracks, and 5) integrate the fundamentals of the anatomy and physiology of human swallowing, a knowledge base that has become increasingly important over the years in the training of speech-language pathologists. We also wanted an accompanying workbook that would contain problems ranging from the easy, memorization type to those requiring a fair amount of thought.

But every rose has its missing petals, as did ours, which even those who admired our text were quick to point out. Our missing petal was a chapter on the brain. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), in coordination with other government agencies, had identified the period between 1990 and 2000 as “The Decade of the Brain,” and indeed during those ten years there was an explosion of research on the relationships among neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, brain lesions in a host of diseases, and behavior. brainThis explosion was heard throughout the speech science world as well, and continues to resonate with speech-language professionals to the present day. The brain processes underlying speech and language behavior, both normal and impaired,
are under heavy scientific and clinical scrutiny and speech-language pathologists need to be well-versed in this area.  With an ever-increasing aging population and its associated neurogenic diseases and their potential to affect speech-language behaviors, most training programs are putting added emphasis on a deep understanding of brain structures and mechanisms as they relate to communication. So in our second edition of Preclinical Speech Science, we have tried to enhance the rose with a new petal—a full chapter devoted to neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and brain processes and models specific to speech production and perception.  In preparing this chapter, we retained our devotion to high quality images and patient, comprehensive text to make those images relevant and highly accessible as a new source of knowledge for the student.  We also showed how contemporary models of brain function in speech production are relevant to the diagnosis and management of disorders such as dysarthria and apraxia of speech.

In our writing of the new edition of Preclinical Speech Science, we have also updated much of the information in the original chapters, fixed mistakes, and prepared a new workbook to accompany it.  We urge you to give it a try, stop to smell the anatomical,  physiological, acoustic and perceptual roses in the forest.  If you allow your eyes to linger for a while on the wonderful images drawn by Maury Aaseng and think about what’s written in the text, we think you’ll find the ground less like a bed of coals and more like a cool stroll.  And your knowledge of all things speech science will make you cool in the eyes of your fellow health care professionals!

Featured Article- Choral Pedagogy, Third Edition


CHORAL PEDAGOGY, 3RD edition

Brenda Smith, DMA and Robert T. Sataloff, MD, DMA

Choral Pedagogy 3rd

Singing is known to every culture around the world.   For most of us, singing skill is learned collaboratively in choirs.  To participate in a choir throughout a lifetime, we must adjust our vocal expectations and maintain a dynamic sense of readiness for the changes that occur from year to year.  The choral conductor must work nimbly to accommodate the vocal needs of each age group, including all singers at all times in assignments appropriate to the contributions they are able to make.  There are many challenges, but choral pedagogy, voice science and medical resources are equipped to assist the choral conductor in the creation of a dynamic rehearsal and performance plan.

Lifelong Singing

For the training of vocal skill, trained and amateur singers of any age benefit from the personal attention of a voice builder or choral conductor.  Each voice presents with a specific complement of unique set of vocal, aural, rhythmic and interpretative gifts.  Because singers perceive their voices differently the way they are perceived by their listeners, singers at any age rely on constructive feedback generated by the trusted ears and eyes of a qualified person.

choirChanges in range are a natural part of the aging process and are due to the loss of muscle bulk and alterations in connective tissue in the vocal fold, as well as to respiratory changes, blood flow and alterations in body muscle nerve condition, and other alterations.  Another factor is the ossification of laryngeal cartilages.  The degree of aging changes varies from singer to singer.  People who love to sing wish to be included in choral activities as long as possible.  Choral singing can be particularly beneficial for the preservation of vocal skill and for delaying the inevitable losses of range, control and agility.

 

Medical Aspects

While choral conductors are not expected to have the medical knowledge of physicians, they should have sufficient familiarity with vocal health problems to recognize at least obvious voice dysfunction and suggest that afflicted singers seek medical attention.  Medical voice care has advanced markedly over the last few decades.  Voice is now an established subspecialty of otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat), and expert care for singers is available much more widely than it used to be.

Good medical diagnosis in all fields often depends on asking the right questions and then listening carefully to the answers. This process is known as “taking a history.” Recently, medical care for voice problems has utilized a markedly expanded, comprehensive history, recognizing that there is more to the voice than simply the vocal folds. Virtually any body system may be responsible for voice complaints. In fact, problems outside the larynx often cause voice dysfunction in people whose vocal folds appear fairly normal and who would have received no effective medical care a few years ago.

Physical examination of a patient with voice complaints involves a complete ear, nose, and throat assessment and examination of other body systems as appropriate. In the last few years, subjective examination has been supplemented by technological aids that improve the ability to “see” the vocal mechanism and allow quantification of aspects of its function. With phonation at middle C, the vocal folds come together and separate approximately 250 times per second. Strobovideolaryngoscopy uses a laryngeal microphone to trigger a stroboscope that illuminates the vocal folds, allowing the examiner to assess them in “slow motion”. This technology allows visualization of small masses, and other abnormalities that are simply missed in vocal folds that looked “normal” under continuous light. The instruments contained in a well-equipped clinical voice laboratory assess six categories of vocal function: vibratory, aerodynamic, phonatory, acoustic, electromyographic, and psychoacoustic. State-of-the-art analysis of vocal function is extremely helpful in the diagnosis, therapy, and evaluation of progress during the treatment of voice disorders.

Following a thorough history, physical examination, and clinical voice laboratory analysis, it is usually possible to arrive at an accurate explanation for voice dysfunction. Of course, treatment depends on the etiology (cause). Fortunately, as technology has improved voice medicine, the need for laryngeal surgery has diminished. When the underlying problem is corrected properly, the voice usually improves, but collaborative treatment by a team of specialists is most desirable to ensure general and vocal health and optimize voice function. The choir director should be part of that team.  Details of medical problems associated with voice disorders may be found in other literature. 1-4

The Basics of Singing

Warm ups and cools downs are necessary for any singer.  Warm up and cool down exercises adjust the vocal instrument from speech to singing and from singing back to speech.  Warm ups and cool downs involve four elements: relaxation, posture, breathing and resonance.  Relaxation before and after singing contributes to vocal health.  The vocal mechanism and the extremities need to be stretched and warmed.  Good posture, both standing and seated, must be established in order to achieve a full breath.  Conductors should be mindful that singing in a seated position is not an easy task.  All singers should maintain an erect posture that allows maximum muscular freedom, flexibility and safety.   A buoyant, flexible approach to breath support during exhalation follows.  The final step to vocal readiness involves uniting the breath with the vocal sound.  Exercises that evoke resonant sounds, such as humming, trilling with the lips or sighing set the stage for a focused vocal tone.  In the process of cool down, singers return the voice to the speaking range by sighing, chanting or humming through the mid and lower registers.

singer

The role singing plays in the daily life of each singer is diverse and unique.  The rhythm and discipline of music learning sharpens mental acumen and memory. For choir members who maintain interests in acting and public speaking, singing can be a means of maintaining vocal strength and stamina.  For many, singing in a choir makes life worth living.  The overall musical results of a choir rehearsal may be of less importance than the good experience of being together for the task of singing.  Singers want to continue singing as long as they can and as well as they can.  Choral pedagogy is advancing to accommodate the special needs of singers of all ages.  By establishing good singing habits, remaining physically fit, setting reasonable goals, and attending to vocal health, choral singers can “stay in the game” for many decades.

References

  1. Sataloff, R.TProfessional Voice: The Science and Art of Clinical Care, Third Edition.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2005.
  2. Rubin, J., Sataloff, R.T. and Korovin, G Diagnosis and Treatment of Voice Disorders, Fourth Edition.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2013, in press
  3. Heman-Ackah, Y.D., Sataloff, R.T. and Hawkshaw, M.J.  Protecting the Vocal Instrument.  Narberth, PA: Science and Medicine; 2013.
  4. Smith, B. and Sataloff, R.T.  Choral Pedagogy and the Older Singer.  San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.; 2012.

 

 

Feature Article: Why Quality Matters: The Changing Healthcare Delivery Model

Brian Taylor

Why Quality Matters: The Changing Healthcare Delivery Model

By Brian Taylor, AuD

In fits and starts, physicians and other healthcare professionals are beginning to realize that the convergence of wireless sensors, social networking, mobile connectivity and robust data management systems will profoundly impact the future. This transformation of medicine is likely to put a premium on healthcare professionals that place the patient firmly in the center of the clinical experience. These same forces will undoubtedly affect audiologists and their support staffs, and quality is likely to be a key differentiator in a disruptive future.

In this new world, physicians and other healthcare professionals are more likely to be reimbursed for the quality of their results, rather than the sheer number of procedures they order. Hospitals and clinics that demonstrate higher-than-average patient satisfaction scores will enjoy higher rates of reimbursement from federally funded programs. Patients are even joining the quality bandwagon as many are demanding greater transparency when shopping for medical services. In essence, patients are demanding to be treated more like customers. Consumer-centered health care is gradually supplanting the antiquated, paternalistic model in which the practitioner is never questioned and has near omnipotent authority over the uninformed patient. Out of this paradigm shift comes the quality movement. For audiologists this means the use of report cards, key performance indicators, and other quality strategies and tactics, if they want to stay relevant in a highly competitive marketplace. If you are like the typical practitioner, there is a good chance these concepts related to quality sound a little strange to you now. This is why I wrote Quality in Audiology: Design and Implementation of the Patient Experience, to help you prepare for some of these changes.

Interestingly, hearing aid manufacturers are very familiar with many of these concepts. In an effort to rise above their fierce competition, manufacturers have been obligated to standardize quality within their production lines by using tools such as Six Sigma and Total Quality Management. At the heart of these quality tools is a drive to eliminate variance. Eliminating variance is a worthy goal for the optimization of medical devices, but clinicians know all-too-well that each patient has built-in variability. Thus, many of the quality concepts and tools device manufacturers have come to rely on to incrementally improve quality don’t work well with patients. This paradox of quality within healthcare, as the book suggests, can be overcome through the standardization of quality around six patient staging areas.

Taylor_QA

The purpose of this book is to bring a level of practicality to the implementation of quality within an audiology clinic. As the book proposes, quality is improved mainly through your grassroots initiatives: procedures, programs, and behaviors you implement, measure, and manage in your clinic. This grassroots perspective requires audiologists and other professionals associated with hearing heath care to reexamine the concept of quality. According to the International Standards Organization, which acts as a sort of quality police for device manufactures, quality is the totality of characteristics, including people, processes, products environments, standards, and learning, of an entity that bear upon its ability to satisfy stated and implied needs. This definition suggests we improve ourselves and our ability to create quality in the world around us through innovation and the judicious use of best practice standards.

From a workaday, clinical standpoint, quality is meeting the requirements and expectations of patients and stakeholders in the business. In short, quality is probably best defined as the standardization of individual excellence. Rather than rely on academic boards and government agencies, the quest for better quality begins with self-motivated and dedicated audiologists and support staff who can use data to make better decisions about their patients. Quality in Audiology will get you on the path to continuous improvement in your clinic.

Plural Community – April 2012

The April issue of Plural Community is here! In this issue you can:

– enter to win a copy of Clinical Management of Swallowing, Third Edition

– check out our new releases like Choral Pedagogy and the Older Singer

– read a great article by Linda I. Rosa-Lugo, Forin M. Mihai, and Joyce W. Nutta on language and literacy development for English learners with communication disordess

– see Plural’s upcoming events

– and more!

 

Check it out here: Plural Community – April 2012

 

January’s Plural Community

We are delighted to send you the January 2012 issue of our free content (and free to circulate) newsletter, Plural Community—featuring an article by James E. Peck on the little-understood issue of pseudohypacusis, or false and exaggerated hearing loss. Click here to read it!

Our regular features include our free-to-enter prize drawing, and a listing of conferences where you can meet our people and browse our books.

Thank you for reading on; we wish you and your families all the best for 2012.

November’s Plural Community Newsletter

The November issue of Plural Community is here! Click here to read it!

In this issue you can:

– enter to win a copy of The Deaf Child in a Hearing Family

 

– see our new releases, like Janice Chapman’s Singing and Teaching Singing: a Holistic Approach to Classical Voice, Second Edition

– read an article about Uganda’s first Speech-Language Pathologists by Helen Barrett

– and find out about the ASHA Foundation fundraiser held at the home of ASHFoundation board member, and Plural CEO, Angie Singh!

 

 

New Surgical Instrument Guide Coming Soon!

The pocket partner to Pasha’s Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery is coming soon! Releasing this Fall, Otolaryngology Surgical Instrument Guide serves as a handy reference of more than 200 of the most frequently used surgical instruments in otolaryngology. Organized by surgical subspecialty, this pocket guide features professional photographs of the instruments, their formal name, their aliases and details on how to set up equipment. Order your copy here.

Welcome to the June 2011 issue of Plural Community, the free newsletter by your community, for your community.

In advance of the publication of his new book Cutaneous Malignancy of the Head and Neck : A Multidisciplinary Approach, co-author Brian Moore writes our feature article on the subject of skin cancer—a condition that he now ranks as not far short of epidemic.

Congratulations are extended to our winners! Gina Palma from Bronx, NY, was the winner of our Plural Community May competition and received free copy of Communication and Swallowing in Parkinson Disease. Michael Wadie won a copy of the forthcoming Cutaneous Malignancy of the Head and Neck: A Multidisciplinary Approach and Alan Chu received Health Care Reform Through Practical Clinical Guidelines, both at the annual COSM conference. Lastly, congratulations to Clarissa Rider, who won a free copy of What Every Singer Needs to Know About the Body at May’s Classical Singer convention. For details on June’s competition, see below!

We hope you enjoy!