Practicing Clinicians Need Practical Ideas

Phonological Treatment of Speech Sound Disorders in Children: A Practical Guide

Jackie Bauman-Waengler, Ph.D., CCC-SLP and Diane Garcia, MS, CCC-SLP

Why should I buy this book? What is unique about it?

The first unique feature of this workbook is that it is intended for practicing clinicians who work with children with speech sound disorders. From this workbook’s inception, the goal was to make something user-friendly that clinicians could use in various ways with a limited investment of time.  Another distinguishing feature is its summary of several of the most frequently used approaches for treating phonological disorders in children. While there are other textbooks that give a broad-based understanding of treatment of phonological disorders, this workbook offers a more in-depth discussion of eight different approaches. It describes the type of children this therapy would be optimally suited for, the diagnostic information needed, how to select targets for treatment, how to structure therapy, how to monitor progress, examples of intervention goals, and group therapy ideas. And, for every therapy concept, it provides examples of research which support evidence-based practice with this treatment protocol.

What are the strengths of this book?

This workbook has several areas of strength. First, its structure is a strength. Every therapy chapter offers a brief overview of the method, examples of supporting research, target selection procedures, sample goals, data collection strategies, treatment guidelines, and group therapy ideas. This structure provides the clinician with an easy to follow process from beginning implementation to monitoring therapy progress. Second, many worksheets are offered which can be tailored to meet the needs of individual children. This saves the clinician time during the assessment and intervention process. Third, case studies are offered in each of the chapters to demonstrate the concepts. There is also a separate chapter at the end of the book which is devoted to four children of different ages with varying degrees of severity. Assessment data for each child are given as well as a brief glimpse of a portion of therapy. Fourth, group therapy ideas are included in many of the chapters. To account for increased caseloads, many clinicians must often structure therapy within a group. These ideas offer group application possibilities for children with speech sound disorders and possibly language impairments.

How will this book help me practically in my job setting?

Many clinicians in a variety of settings are working with children with phonological disorders. With caseloads increasing, we often do not have a large amount of time to become experts in the various treatment options available, nor to decide which treatment protocol might be the most effective for an individual child. This workbook gives clinicians a streamlined version which is easy to use while offering specific data collection forms and protocols which assist and guide the therapist throughout the entire process. It also offers a large quantity of practical information that can be immediately used in therapy. Clinicians will find the progression through each of the treatment options easy to follow and practical to implement. In addition, every chapter contains two case studies that demonstrate the application of assessment information to structuring therapy. These case studies will give clinicians further support in developing appropriate intervention plans for their own clients.

What phonological intervention approaches are addressed in this workbook and how were they chosen?

The eight approaches in this book are: Minimal Pair Therapy; Multiple Oppositions; Maximal Oppositions; Complexity Approaches; Phonotactic Therapy; Core Vocabulary Intervention; Cycles Approach; and Phonological/Phonemic Awareness.  These eight were selected based upon several factors: research demonstrating positive evidence-based practice, frequent use of the method, ease of implementation, and availability of resources to support application.  Some of the approaches included represent comprehensive therapeutic protocols, while others primarily describe a specific target selection strategy.  All are designed to remediate phonological difficulties, yet do not necessarily exclude the principles which govern a traditional sound-by-sound approach.

What are the characteristics of children who would most benefit from phonological intervention?

As the name implies, phonological intervention approaches are designed for children with phonological disorders.  That said, all children who demonstrate a speech sound disorder, regardless of etiology, may potentially benefit from the principles of phonological therapy.  Appropriate recipients typically demonstrate more than one or two speech sound errors. They may demonstrate pervasive sound error patterns and exhibit highly unintelligible speech. With specific methods it is important that the child demonstrates a collapse of phonemic contrasts. In other words, one phoneme replaces many other phonemes. For example, the child uses “t” for “s”, “z”, and both the voiceless and voiced “th” sounds.  With other therapy protocols the child fits best if a very restricted phonemic inventory is noted.  Specific characteristics of children who would benefit from each therapy approach, such as age, severity, and types of errors, are provided in this workbook.  This information gives clinicians concrete and verifiable guidelines for selection of appropriate intervention methods for individual children.

What are the advantages of using a phonological intervention approach, as opposed to a traditional motor approach?

There are many advantages!  Phonological intervention targets often include patterns or groups of phonemes, rather than individual sounds.  This results in broader change across a child’s entire phonological system.  Phonological approaches have successfully demonstrated generalization to other sounds or patterns through careful selection of targets according to specific guidelines (Gierut, 2007). On the other hand, the traditional motor approach focuses on correct remediation of the physical production of individual sounds in a sound-by-sound manner. The traditional approach can take a much longer therapy time and generalization to other sounds does not seem to occur (e.g., Bowen, 2011; Dinnsen, Chin, & Elbert, 1992). In addition, phonological therapy targets the linguistic function of sounds, that is, the use of phonemes to create meaningful words.  This shift in focus allows clinicians to facilitate functional communication in natural contexts, thus improving children’s ability to communicate during daily interactions.

I have just been using the traditional-motor approach. Is that wrong?

The traditional motor approach, sometimes called the phonetic approach, is not intended for every child with a speech sound disorder. Decades of research have documented that some children make faster, and more broad-based progress with some of the phonological treatment options (Gierut, Elbert, & Dinnsen, 1987; Gierut, Morrisette, Hughes, & Rowland, 1996; Tyler & Figurski, 1994 ). If you have children on your caseload with multiple errors, then the traditional approach, going sound-by-sound through the child’s errors, can take an enormous amount of time. This is time they are spending in speech therapy and not within the classroom. The goal is to get these children out of therapy as soon as possible. Phonological treatment methods are one very successful way to do this.

 

Bowen, C. (2011). Target selection in phonological intervention. Retrieved from http://www.speech-language-therapy.com/ on 8/12/2018.

Dinnsen, D. A., Chin, S. B., & Elbert, M. (1992). On the lawfulness of change in phonetic inventories. Lingua, 86, 207–222.

Gierut, J. A. (2007). Phonological complexity and language learnability. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 16, 6–17.

Gierut, J. A., Elbert, M., & Dinnsen, D. A. (1987). A functional analysis of phonological knowledge and generalization learning in misarticulating children. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 30, 462–479.

Gierut, J. A., Morrisette, M. L., Hughes, M. T., & Rowland, S. (1996). Phonological treatment efficacy and developmental norms. Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 27, 215–230.

Tyler, A. A., & Figurski, G. R. (1994). Phonetic inventory changes after treating distinctions along an implicational hierarchy. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 8, 91–107.