AudiologyNOW! 2016 Author Signing Schedule

AudiologyNOW! attendees – Meet our authors and connect with experts in the field! Stop by the Plural booth (#301) for the following Meet the Author sessions: 


Thursday, April 14, 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Meet Marc Fagelson, BA, MS, PhD 
Co-editor of Tinnitus: Clinical and Research Perspectives

Marc Fagelson   Tinnitus


Thursday, April 14, 3:00 – 3:30 pm
Meet Mark DeRuiter, MBA, PhD and Virginia Ramachandran, AuD, PhD
Authors of Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition 

Mark DeRuiter   Virginia Ramachandran   Basic Audiometry Learning Manual, Second Edition


Friday, April 15, 11:00 – 11:30 am
Meet Ruth Bentler, PhD, H. Gustav Mueller, PhD, and Todd A. Ricketts, PhD
Authors of Modern Hearing Aids: Verification, Outcome Measures, and Follow-Up  

Ruth Bentler   H. Gustav Mueller   Todd A. Ricketts  Bentler_MHA.jpg

Congratulations to Ruth Bentler, 2016 recipient of the Jerger Award for Research in Audiology. 


Friday, April 15, 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Meet Anne Marie Tharpe, PhD
Co-editor of Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology, Second Edition

Anne Marie Tharpe   Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology

Congratulations to Anne Marie Tharpe, 2016 recipient of the Marion Downs Award for Excellence in Pediatric Audiology. 

Healing Voices

Healing Voices (1)By Leda Scearce, MM, MS, CCC-SLP author of Manual of Singing Voice Rehabilitation: A Practical Approach to Vocal Health and Wellness

Singing is a part of virtually every culture and is fundamental to our human experience. In the United States, singing is enormously popular, as evidenced by the vast number of people engaged in all kinds of singing activities. Over 30 million Americans participate in choral singing alone (Chorus America, 2009). Shows such as The Voice, America’s Got Talent, and American Idol illustrate how passionate we are about singing. From the amateur recreational singer to the elite celebrity, we sing as soloists and in ensembles, with instruments and a cappella, in classical and contemporary styles, on stage, in concert, and in the shower.

Every person’s voice is unique and identifiable, and our voices can be a big part of our identity and how we see ourselves in the world. This is especially true for singers, for whom the voice is not only intricately tied to self-image and self-esteem but also may be a source of income and livelihood, creative expression, spiritual engagement, and quality of life. For a singer, a voice injury represents a crisis. Because of the specialized needs of singers, it takes a team—including a laryngologist, speech-language pathologist, and singing voice rehabilitation specialist—to get a singer back on track following an injury or voice disorder. Singing voice rehabilitation is a hybrid profession, requiring in-depth clinical and scientific knowledge married with excellence in teaching singing.

Voice problems are rarely isolated in etiology—usually multiple factors converge to create an injury. These factors may include poor vocal hygiene, inadequate vocal technique, an imbalance in vocal load and medical problems (allergies and reflux are common in singers, but thyroid, pulmonary, neurologic, and rheumatologic conditions are among the illnesses that may affect the voice). The singing voice rehabilitation process must encompass all elements that may be contributing to the problem: medical factors, vocal hygiene, vocal coordination and conditioning, vocal pacing, and emotional factors. Continue reading

Managing the Expectations of the Common Core State Standards

Lissa_Power-deFur      PowerdeFur_CCSS

By Lissa A. Power-deFur, author of Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist: Standards-Based Intervention for Special Population

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in school districts across the country have returned to school, often with the new (or renewed) obligation of addressing the “Common Core” (or the “Career and College Readiness Standards” as the Common Core State Standards [CCSS] is referred to in some states.) The SLPs’ reactions are likely to include the following:

  • With all the students on my caseload, how can I possibly do something else?
  • This is just another education fad; it’ll pass in a couple of years.
  • From what I hear about these standards, they aren’t applicable to the students on my caseload.
  • I’m focusing on the IEP goals, they are most important for my students.

These are common reactions, reflecting the current challenges and pressures of working as an SLP in the schools. However, it is important that all SLPs working with children, whether in schools or other settings, understand that the CCSS is now the lens through which educators must view the achievement of all students, including students with speech-language impairments. The education standards movement has been in place for over two decades, with states first adopting their own standards and developing assessments to measure student achievement of those standards. More recently, the National Governors’ Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, used teams of educators, business professionals, and policy-makers to develop the Common Core State Standards. Released in 2010, 43 states have adopted the CCSS. The Standards serve as the basis for state assessments developed by two consortiums, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.

As SLPs study the CCSS, they will find that the Standards encompass a hierarchy of language skills from phonological awareness to the ability to understanding diverse perspectives, from comprehension of discipline-specific vocabulary to syntactic complexity in speech and text. The CCSS emphasize oral language and phonological awareness in the primary grades, as kindergarteners must demonstrate skills in counting, pronouncing, blending, and segmenting syllables in spoken words. The CCSS expect secondary students to use oral communication effectively to present findings and support their evidence clearly and concisely using a style appropriate to the audience and task. In the vocabulary area, students must demonstrate such diverse skills as mastery of morphology for understanding meaning to becoming adept at understanding euphemisms, hyperbole, and paradox. Students’ skills in the conventions of Standard English develop from early skills in using nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to secondary level skills in using parallel structure in their oral and written communication.

The CCSS provide an excellent vehicle for SLPs to use to support collaboration with their education partners. As SLPs communicate with teachers, the CCSS provides a common vocabulary to describe student expectations and performance, thereby facilitating the education team’s focus on needed language and communication skills. A typical child on the SLP’s caseload will have difficulty acquiring standards from prior grade levels. The CCSS can serve as a resource SLPs can use in explaining the effect of children’s speech-language impairments on their ability to master specific standards. By using the language of the CCSS in describing students’ performance, the SLP’s ability to communicate with teachers and administrators about the challenges the child is and will be facing is enhanced.

SLPs will find that an analysis model facilitates their ability to integrate the standards into their intervention planning. A 5-step model builds upon SLPs’ extensive knowledge of the language and metalinguistic skills and leads to development of collaborative direct and classroom-based intervention activities. In step 1, SLPs work collaboratively to identify the standards needed for success. SLPs will analyze the CCSS, identifying the specific expectations that will rely on the student’s language and communication skills. Due to the magnitude of the CCSS, this task quickly becomes overwhelming. Therefore, SLPs are urged to follow the practice of their education partners—creating teams to review the standards. By working with colleagues, SLPs can focus on the areas that relate to their expertise. For example, SLPs with specialization in fluency can review the standards for expectations for oral communication and presentations. SLPs with a passion for literacy can focus on these standards. Another approach would be for SLPs to focus on all standards or the grade levels they serve (or the grade levels their students have just left and will be moving into). Not only does teamwork minimize the workload, it enables the creative generation ideas that flow from a collaborative group of professionals. The Plural book, Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist:  Standards-based Interventions for Special Populations, provides SLPs with examples of the language and communication expectations of the standards.

The model’s second step focuses on detailed identification of the language and communication skills needed for success. This analysis addresses phonology, morpho-syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic and metalinguistic skills. The SLPs will find standards that require competency in speech sound production and fluency as well. This is another task completed well by a team of SLPs, reducing the workload and facilitating the brainstorming and analysis. The result will be a comprehensive understanding of the standards.

Step 3 shifts the attention from the standards to individual students. The SLP will complete a thorough analysis of a student’s current skills and needs. Data sources include standardized assessments, observations of the child in the classroom, classroom work samples (e.g., narratives, spelling tests), and probes of specific skills. Many of these items will be found in the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) of the child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). However, SLPs will find that they will want to generate skill-specific probes to understand the nuances of the child’s needs as they plan for intervention.

At this point, the SLP’s focus shifts to consideration of the expectations in the child’s classroom. The SLP will use information from observations to identify the language of the classroom communications, especially directions, texts, and instructional activities. A specific focus on morphological-syntactic constructions and vocabulary will enable the SLP to focus on specific skills the child will need for success. If multiple SLPs have children in this same classroom, this can be a joint activity.

The final step is to design intervention. Children’s academic success relies on their ability to apply the language and communication skills developed under the guidance of the SLP into real-world settings (i.e., the classroom). Therefore, the intervention should be a combination of direct intervention and collaborative classroom-based intervention. This combination of approaches allows for a specific focus on skill attainment, followed by application of that skill. The SLP may find it particularly valuable to participate in classroom center activities, working with specific children and facilitating their mastery of skills through collaboration with other students. This step relies on a collegial working relationship with the child’s classroom teacher(s), with time for planning to enable both professionals to identify which skills they will focus on and the nature of interventions.

The use of a stepwise model for analyzing the standards and applying this information to the strengths and needs of a specific child enables the SLP to tailor intervention to what matters for children—academic success. It is only through the SLP’s comprehensive knowledge of the academic standards and analysis of the specific linguistic expectations of the standards that students with language and communication difficulties can successfully meet the academic demands of 21st century schools.

About the Author 

Lissa A. Power-deFur, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, is a professor in the communication sciences and disorders program at Longwood University in Virginia. Among the courses she teaches is public school methods, which focuses on supporting children’s mastery of the language expectations of the Common Core State Standards. In her clinical role at Longwood, she has collaborated with local school districts for service delivery. She received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in speech-language pathology at the University of Virginia. She is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Virginia, and regularly volunteers for the profession. Dr. Power-deFur has served as a state education advocacy leader and as a member of numerous education-related committees at ASHA. She is the ASHA 2014–2016 vice president of standards and ethics in speech-language pathology. Additionally, she received The ASHA Leader Outstanding Service Award for her 2011 article on special education eligibility.

 

 

Insight into the Significance of Supporting Caregivers from Dr. Payne’s New Book

Joan_Payne Payne_SFC

By Joan C. Payne, PhD

Author of the new Supporting Family Caregivers of Adults With Communication Disorders: A Resource Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists

In the United States, there are nearly 44,443, 800 family caregivers over the age of 18 who are caring for someone aged 50 years and older (Alzheimer’s Association, 2011; National Alliance of Caregivers in collaboration with AARP, 2009). Family, or informal, caregivers are family members and friends who provide unpaid care and advocacy for a chronically ill or disabled person for 20 hours a week or more. As such, family caregivers are the nexus between the formal health care system and the community for many individuals. Family caregivers, also called informal caregivers as opposed to those who are paid to render care, are vital extensions of the health care system. Without them, many persons discharged from acute and rehabilitative hospitals would not be able to care for themselves. The efforts of family caregivers are so important to the health, positive mental outlook, and indeed, survival of care recipients that their services are invaluable and predicted to be needed more and more as the 21st century continues.

This is why I am so excited about my book! Supporting Family Caregivers of Adult with Communication Disorders. A Resource Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists represents the first time that caregiver issues and resources have been organized and put in one place for the benefit of health professionals and the families of their patients. Much of my passion for the topic of caregivers comes from my remembering how stressful caregiving was because I really did not know what to do 20 years ago even though I had advanced degrees in speech-language pathology. The purpose of putting this information in one place where it is readily accessible is to empower speech-language pathologists and audiologists and other health professionals to support family caregivers of adults with disorders of communication and swallowing.

Caregiving is a deeply personal and intensive enterprise. Many caregivers report that they have appreciated the time to forge more intimate and caring relationships with their loved ones. At the same time, a significant body of research indicates that caregiving is also costly in terms of time, effort and financial sacrifice. Many caregivers are placed in the primary role of helping others without adequate resources with which to provide the best care. Caregiving can be so stressful that caregivers can themselves develop diseases and disabling conditions which affect their caregiving and those who depend upon them. For some, the stress can be so crippling that some caregivers are forced to abandon providing care altogether, or they become terminally ill.

To that end, each chapter addresses the issues of caregiving of adults with communication and swallowing disorders. Chapter 2 gives an overview of statistics on family caregivers, caregiver responsibilities for care, the economics of family caregiving, and concepts of caregiver burden, strain and stress. In addition, information on the effects of caregiving on physical, mental and emotional health of those who provide care is also provided. Caregiving has been recognized as an important national resource. There are laws that protect and support caregivers at the local and national levels, and Chapter 2 also includes national and state legislation that supports family caregivers when they deliver care. Chapter 3 describes the diversity of caregivers and how culture and tradition prescribe who will care for disabled adults as well as how caregivers use both internal and external resources. There are important differences in how caregivers perceive and accept caregiving responsibilities across ethnic and cultural groups. These differences have implications for how caregivers manage when the responsibilities becomes stressful. There are also some differences in how caregivers may accept and comply with counseling and referrals. Chapter 4 discusses basic characteristics of various brain-based diseases and disorders that affect communication and swallowing with a focus on how these disabling conditions affect communication and swallowing disorders and to assist caregivers in minimizing communication breakdowns.

Chapter 5 is developed from the perspective of audiologists and includes basic information on hearing loss, auditory processing disorders, balance disorders, cochlear implants and hearing aids, as well as the impact on caregivers. Included in this chapter is information on helping caregivers with hearing aid upkeep. A major portion of the chapter is devoted to assistive and augmentative technologies which audiologists can use to educate caregivers of adults with hearing loss who can benefit from these devices. Perceptions of burden, strain and stress interfere with a caregiver’s ability to provide quality and sustained care.

Chapter 6 describes assessments that measure caregiver strain, burden, stress and coping with caring responsibilities. Chapter 7 introduces concepts of education and counseling caregivers within the clinical setting and within the scope of practice. Educating and training caregivers can be helpful in improving communication and providing a continuum of therapy outside of the clinical setting. Although speech-language pathologists do not provide counseling in many areas of need, resource information is provided that can be shared with caregivers that will empower them to find answers to their most important questions, like respite or hospice care, elder law, and insurance. Chapter 8 provides information on other health care professionals and their areas of expertise. It is designed to inform speech-language pathologists and audiologists about the most appropriate professionals to whom caregivers should be referred when they need counseling in specific areas outside of the scope of practice.

Chapter 9, the final chapter, describes a case of a newly-wed husband who suffers a stroke and how his stroke affects his wife and their relationship. Without support from health professionals, his wife flounders in her caregiving role. Their story ends tragically, but questions are presented to guide clinicians to avoid missing caregiver needs.

It is hoped that this book will serve as a resource for health professionals and students in speech-language pathology and audiology and that it will become part of the toolkit for assisting caregivers. It is also the intent that this resource book will be helpful to those who are involved in caregiving now and in the future.

References

Alzheimer’s Association (2011). Alzheimer’s disease facts and figures. Retrieved from http://www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2011.pdf

National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP (2009). Caregiving in the U.S. Retrieved from http://www.caregiving.org/data/Caregiving_in_the_US_2009_full_report.pdf

About the Author

Joan C. Payne, PhD, is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and is a professor of communication disorders at Howard University in Washington, DC, where she has been a member of the faculty for more than 40 years. She is nationally and internationally recognized for her work in neurogenic language disorders from an ethnobiological perspective and is the 2014 recipient of the Scholar-Mentor Award from the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing.

Effective Communication: A New Health Care Obligation

Beukelman Effective Communication Image

By: Sarah W. Blackstone, David R. Beukelman, and Kathryn M. Yorkston
Editors of the new Patient-Provider Communication: Roles for Speech-Language Pathologists and Other Health Care Professionals

Prior to his accident, Frank was a 26-year-old energetic, physically active young adult with a wide range of interests and a full social life. A C3–C4 cervical spine injury left him unable to move his limbs. When medically stabilized, he was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit, where he was ventilator dependent and in halo traction. He was unable to speak and his only intentional gesture was a gaze shift. The hospital communication team helped Frank establish a reliable yes/no response (looking up to indicate “yes” and down for “no”). They encouraged his nurses and family to offer other choices as well (“maybe” or “later” or “I don’t know”). A speech-language pathologist showed him a speech-generating device (SGD), but when initially asked if he wanted to use it to “talk,” he responded by looking down, “No.” Later that same day, the team demonstrated the SGD again, showing him how he could use it to control the TV and a fan. When asked if he would be willing to give it a try, he replied, “Yes!” by looking up. Within 24 hours, Frank was using a template on the SGD to call a nurse, ask for medication, control a fan, and turn the TV off and on, all with a simple serial scan method and a switch. Over time, he became an active participant in his recovery process, asking doctors questions and participating in decisions about his treatment plan.

Effective communication between patients and providers is a core component of patient-centered and value-based health care. According to the Joint Commission (2010, p.1), effective patient provider communication is the successful joint establishment of meaning in which patients and health care providers exchange information, enabling patients to participate actively in their care from admission through discharge, and ensuring that the responsibilities of both patients and providers are understood. To be truly effective, communication requires a two-way process (expressive and receptive) in which messages are negotiated until the information is correctly understood by both parties.

The medical encounters that occur across the continuum of health care are usually time constrained and many are stressful, high-stake interactions. When communication breakdowns occur, the impacts can be devastating for patients, family members, providers, and the health care system. Research shows that communication difficulties are among the major causes of sentinel events and can negatively affect patient outcomes, safety, and satisfaction, as well as result in increased readmission rates, length of stay, and additional health care costs. Because of the diversity of patients and families served in our health care systems, successful communication can be very difficult to achieve. In fact, many patients present with multiple communication vulnerabilities.

At age 4 years, 6 months, Guillermo was in the ICU, intubated and awake following a series of surgeries for tracheoesophageal reconstruction. Guillermo and his family were from Honduras and spoke Spanish only. Guillermo was most relaxed when his mother or eldest brother were sitting next to his bed and rubbing his arm. Although hospital policy supported his family remaining at bedside throughout the day and night, there were moments when they needed to step away for personal care, to attend team meetings along with a translator, or for other reasons. The speech-language pathologist provided Guillermo with a simple voice output aid (Ablenet Little Mack) with messages that included, “Where is my family,” recorded in both Spanish and English, so hospital staff could understand him. The speech-language pathologists also made a 20-target Go Talk+ device (Attainment Company) available to him. It featured 15 target photos of family members with messages such as, “I want mom,” “You’re my best friend, Frederico,” “I love you,” and “Hold my hand,” as well as some medical messages. All messages were recorded in both languages.

We define “communication vulnerability” as the diminished capacity of an individual to speak, hear, understand, read, remember, or write due to factors that are inherent to the individual (e.g., disabilities related to receptive and expressive language skills, hearing, vision, speech, cognition, and memory, as well as language spoken, lifestyle, belief system, and limited health literacy), or related to the context or situation (e.g., a noisy environment, being intubated in an intensive care unit after surgery, suffering injury while traveling in a foreign country, having cultural practices, lifestyles, or religious beliefs that are not understood or accepted by providers).

Eleven-year-old Joshua had a bone marrow transplant. He was acutely aware of his suppressed immune system and created and used several communication tools during the time he required the use of a Bi-PAP noninvasive ventilator. Using a simple voice output communication tool, Joshua insisted on having the following message available at all times: “If anything falls on the floor, use the Sani-wipe to clean it before you let it touch me. Also, if your gloves touch the floor when you pick it up, change your gloves before coming near me.”

In the book, Patient-Provider Communication: Roles for Speech-Language Pathologists and Other Health Care Professions, we describe how health care facilities and the providers who work within them can begin to assume a more active role in supporting patients who are communication vulnerable. Speech-language pathologists, nurses, administrators, and physicians are key to improving the “culture of communication” within their facilities, spearheading interprofessional practices that benefit all patients and ultimately providers and the facility’s bottom line. Currently, the role of communication intermediary is assumed by a few providers or family members with a personal commitment; although a rising number of health care organizations are beginning to specify policies and role assignments regarding the coordination of communication support services, communication facilitation for all patients with communication difficulties (not just those who are deaf or have second language issues), or a legal or medical intermediary designated to ensure that communication vulnerable patients accurately participate in legal and medical decisions.

Examples of promising practices and strategies across health care settings are highlighted in individual chapters that focus on doctor visits, emergency services, Intensive and acute care settings for children and adults, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, long-term residential care, and end-of-life care. In this book, we have invited authors who have considerable expertise in patient provider communication services across the range of health care settings to share information about the policies, intervention strategies, communication materials, and technologies that are being implemented within their medical settings to support the needs of communication vulnerable patients.

The wife of a person with ALS described his end-of-life experience: He was having a great deal of difficulty breathing and simply could not get comfortable in his hospital bed or wheelchair. We decided to go with in-hospital hospice since his pain management was not well controlled. In hospice, he regularly used his (eye gaze-accessible) SGD to tell us what he did and did not want. I am so grateful that he was able to use it extensively during the last few days of his life. I do not know what we would have done without it.

The authors recognize that there continues to be a considerable gap between clinical research evidence, what is mandated by health care policy, and what is experienced every day by patients, their families, and providers during medical encounters because of the ways in which many health care organizations currently deliver care. In other words, we recognize that implementation, or the process of putting effective patient-provider communication policies into practice, continues to be a challenge within many health care organizations; however, in the final chapter of Patient-Provider Communication we discuss a number of implementation strategies.

References
The Joint Commission. (2010). Advancing effective communication, cultural competence, and patient and family centered care: A roadmap for hospitals. Oakbrook Terrace, IL: Author.

About the Authors
Sarah W. Blackstone, PhD, CCC-SLP, is president of Augmentative Communication, Inc. She has authored multiple texts in the augmentative and alternative communication field as well as articles in Augmentative Communication News and other publications. David R. Beukelman, PhD, CCC-SLP, is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has served as director of research and education for the Communication Disorders Division, Munroe-Meyer Institute for Genetics and Rehabilitation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Kathryn M. Yorkston, PhD, BC-ANCDS, is a professor of rehabilitation medicine and head of the speech pathology division within the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center.

Writing Tips from Plural Authors

Have you ever thought of writing a book in your field? We know that writing a book is no small undertaking, so as part of our 10 year anniversary celebration we enlisted the help of our knowledgeable authors Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD, Lynn Adams, PhD, CCC-SLP, and Lise Menn, PhD, to share advice on writing a best-selling book! Here you will gain some insight into the inspiration, motivation and hard work that goes into a best-selling Speech-Language Pathology and/or Audiology textbook and professional book.

1. What insight or tips would you offer to a first-time author who is writing a professional development book or textbook in the Speech-Language Pathology and/or Audiology field?

CRM: It is very important to make sure that your contribution is original—something that meets a need in the field. I never write a book that competes exactly with something currently in print. I always make sure that my book is unique, original, and has a perspective that no other book has. The questions I also ask are: who would want to buy my book? Why would they spend money on it? What value does it bring to them? What problems does my book help them solve?
It is so important to think about meeting the needs of your audience. As authors, we have our passions and enthusiasms. Who shares them?

LA: JUST START WRITING…..that is the hardest part!!

LM: Have a colleague in a related but different field read through your book to make sure it’s understandable to someone who doesn’t already know the subject matter.

Go back to the original published sources – amazing amounts of old material are easy to get on-line, and you’ll find that you get fresh insights from reading the classic papers instead of relying on the usual summaries. What you take away from a paper that you read for yourself might be quite different from what everyone else has said about it.

Create or find new examples instead of re-using the standard ones that everyone else uses. You might discover something in the process, too. Continue reading

Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder Reviewed

Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder, Volume 1, 2nd Edition

Peer review of Handbook of Central Auditory Processing Disorder: Auditory Neuroscience and Diagnosis, Volume I, Second Edition edited by Frank Musiek, PhD, CCC-A and Gail Chermak, PhD, CCC-A.

Review by Herbert Jay Gould, PhD, Associate Professor, School Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Memphis

The addition of several new chapters to the Handbook of Auditory Processing Disorders Volume 1 is a significant enhancement and expansion of the first edition. The general layout and writing is consistently high quality throughout the book. Several chapters and areas of discussion are particularly valuable to the reader’s basic understanding of CAPD.

The initial section on auditory neuroscience has excellent chapters by Jos Eggermont on central auditory system development and by Phillips on central auditory neuroscience. These two chapters provide a strong basic science underpinning to the remainder of the book. Dr. Eggermont’s chapter ties the anatomic and electrophysiologic activity of the system to the normal behavioral measures of basic signal processing and speech perception of the developing nervous system. The extraordinarily long time course of this system’s maturation exemplifies the difficulties of separating a slowly maturing, but normal system, from a significantly disordered one. Continue reading

Are Your Services Educationally Relevant?

Jean BlosserSchool Programs in Speech-Language Pathology 5th Edition

Jean L. Blosser, EdD, CCC-SLP
President, Creative Strategies for Special Education
Author, School Programs in Speech-Language Pathology: Organization and Service Delivery, Fifth Edition, Plural Publishing, 2012

Educational Relevance—What an Important Concept!
Does a child’s disability impact his or her performance in the classroom? If yes, would services such as speech-language intervention, occupational therapy, or physical therapy make a difference? Should those services be intensive, provided face-to-face or via technology, or integrated into the classroom? The primary question is, if therapy services are offered, will the intervention provided make a difference in the student’s classroom performance, ability to access the curriculum, and/or ability to reach his or her potential?

These are huge questions that administrators, educators, clinicians, and parents ponder every day. When school teams evaluate a student, they seek to determine how the disability may be interfering with the student’s learning. Key educational areas that may be affected are academic, social-emotional, and vocational performance. If everyone agrees there is an adverse effect on educational performance, the student’s eligibility for services is confirmed.

How Do We Guarantee Educational Relevance? Continue reading

Augmentative and Alternative Communication: From Novice to Expert Clinician

By John McCarthy, PhD, CCC-SLP and Aimee Dietz, PhD, CCC-SLP

Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication by John McCarthy and Aimee Dietz

Understanding the personal story of an individual who uses augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can have a positive impact on the attitudes of people without disabilities toward that individual (McCarthy, Donofrio-Horwitz, & Smucker, 2010). Almost any AAC specialist has story after story of moments when they have helped reveal the true abilities of an individual through AAC:

• The eight-year-old boy with cerebral palsy who everyone assumed had below average intellectual ability and presymbolic language skills, was in fact bilingual.
• The forty-year-old woman with bulbar onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who cannot dress or feed herself, but still manages her finances, parents her children, and makes end-of-life decisions.
• The eighteen-year-old girl with autism spectrum disorder whose potential to contribute to society was doubted, yet planned for employment after high school and managed a new mobile device-based communication system.
• The fifty-two-year-old man with stroke-induced aphasia who medical staff assumed was “incompetent”; however, still made informed decisions about medical care and enjoyed friendly banter on the golf course with his adult sons.  Continue reading

Ground-Breaking Book on the Mind-Body Link in Singers

Mind-Body Awareness for Singers by Karen Leigh-Post

Mind-Body Awareness for Singers by Karen Leigh-Post

Mind-Body Awareness for Singers: Unleashing Optimal Performance provides a fundamental understanding of functional anatomy and cognitive neuroscience to guide singers and teachers of singing to unlocking the mystery of the mind-body link involved in the complex audio-motor behavior that is singing.

New theories and concepts, rooted in both the wisdom of masters in the field and current scientific research, are introduced from the unique perspective of the performer. Practical application exercises train the singer to work with, rather than against, the systems of singing to integrate the cognitive and conscious with the unconscious sensory and motor processes of our nervous system. Continue reading