2016 Awards and Honors

We are thrilled to announce the winners of the 2016 Plural Publishing Research Awards given in honor of the late Dr. Sadanand Singh, Plural’s founder. These two scholarships are awarded by the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders and the honorees and their faculty sponsors will be acknowledged at the annual CAPCSD meeting award banquet, in San Antonio, TX on March 31.

At the MS/AuD level, the award went to Chelsea Hull of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Working with advisor Dr. Sherri Jones, Chelsea is researching the impact of Sound Field Amplification (SFA) devices, specifically the REDCAT amplification system, on student academic outcomes and teacher perspectives of this amplification system on academic improvement.

CAPCSD Scholarship Chelsea Hull

Chelsea Hull                                                         Au.D. Student                                             University of Nebraska-Lincoln

At the PhD level, the award was given to Nancy Quick of the University of North Carolina. Under advisor Dr. Melody Harrison, the focus of Nancy’s research is on investigating the impact of underlying linguistic sources of knowledge on spelling among children with hearing aids, cochlear implants and normal hearing, utilizing a multilinguistic analytic approach.

CAPCSD Scholarship Nancy Quick

Nancy Quick, M.S. CCC-SLP               University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill PhD Candidate in Speech and Hearing Sciences, Class of 2017

Congratulations Chelsea and Nancy on your achievements!


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Managing the Expectations of the Common Core State Standards

Lissa_Power-deFur      PowerdeFur_CCSS

By Lissa A. Power-deFur, author of Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist: Standards-Based Intervention for Special Population

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in school districts across the country have returned to school, often with the new (or renewed) obligation of addressing the “Common Core” (or the “Career and College Readiness Standards” as the Common Core State Standards [CCSS] is referred to in some states.) The SLPs’ reactions are likely to include the following:

  • With all the students on my caseload, how can I possibly do something else?
  • This is just another education fad; it’ll pass in a couple of years.
  • From what I hear about these standards, they aren’t applicable to the students on my caseload.
  • I’m focusing on the IEP goals, they are most important for my students.

These are common reactions, reflecting the current challenges and pressures of working as an SLP in the schools. However, it is important that all SLPs working with children, whether in schools or other settings, understand that the CCSS is now the lens through which educators must view the achievement of all students, including students with speech-language impairments. The education standards movement has been in place for over two decades, with states first adopting their own standards and developing assessments to measure student achievement of those standards. More recently, the National Governors’ Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, used teams of educators, business professionals, and policy-makers to develop the Common Core State Standards. Released in 2010, 43 states have adopted the CCSS. The Standards serve as the basis for state assessments developed by two consortiums, the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium.

As SLPs study the CCSS, they will find that the Standards encompass a hierarchy of language skills from phonological awareness to the ability to understanding diverse perspectives, from comprehension of discipline-specific vocabulary to syntactic complexity in speech and text. The CCSS emphasize oral language and phonological awareness in the primary grades, as kindergarteners must demonstrate skills in counting, pronouncing, blending, and segmenting syllables in spoken words. The CCSS expect secondary students to use oral communication effectively to present findings and support their evidence clearly and concisely using a style appropriate to the audience and task. In the vocabulary area, students must demonstrate such diverse skills as mastery of morphology for understanding meaning to becoming adept at understanding euphemisms, hyperbole, and paradox. Students’ skills in the conventions of Standard English develop from early skills in using nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to secondary level skills in using parallel structure in their oral and written communication.

The CCSS provide an excellent vehicle for SLPs to use to support collaboration with their education partners. As SLPs communicate with teachers, the CCSS provides a common vocabulary to describe student expectations and performance, thereby facilitating the education team’s focus on needed language and communication skills. A typical child on the SLP’s caseload will have difficulty acquiring standards from prior grade levels. The CCSS can serve as a resource SLPs can use in explaining the effect of children’s speech-language impairments on their ability to master specific standards. By using the language of the CCSS in describing students’ performance, the SLP’s ability to communicate with teachers and administrators about the challenges the child is and will be facing is enhanced.

SLPs will find that an analysis model facilitates their ability to integrate the standards into their intervention planning. A 5-step model builds upon SLPs’ extensive knowledge of the language and metalinguistic skills and leads to development of collaborative direct and classroom-based intervention activities. In step 1, SLPs work collaboratively to identify the standards needed for success. SLPs will analyze the CCSS, identifying the specific expectations that will rely on the student’s language and communication skills. Due to the magnitude of the CCSS, this task quickly becomes overwhelming. Therefore, SLPs are urged to follow the practice of their education partners—creating teams to review the standards. By working with colleagues, SLPs can focus on the areas that relate to their expertise. For example, SLPs with specialization in fluency can review the standards for expectations for oral communication and presentations. SLPs with a passion for literacy can focus on these standards. Another approach would be for SLPs to focus on all standards or the grade levels they serve (or the grade levels their students have just left and will be moving into). Not only does teamwork minimize the workload, it enables the creative generation ideas that flow from a collaborative group of professionals. The Plural book, Common Core State Standards and the Speech-Language Pathologist:  Standards-based Interventions for Special Populations, provides SLPs with examples of the language and communication expectations of the standards.

The model’s second step focuses on detailed identification of the language and communication skills needed for success. This analysis addresses phonology, morpho-syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic and metalinguistic skills. The SLPs will find standards that require competency in speech sound production and fluency as well. This is another task completed well by a team of SLPs, reducing the workload and facilitating the brainstorming and analysis. The result will be a comprehensive understanding of the standards.

Step 3 shifts the attention from the standards to individual students. The SLP will complete a thorough analysis of a student’s current skills and needs. Data sources include standardized assessments, observations of the child in the classroom, classroom work samples (e.g., narratives, spelling tests), and probes of specific skills. Many of these items will be found in the Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) of the child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). However, SLPs will find that they will want to generate skill-specific probes to understand the nuances of the child’s needs as they plan for intervention.

At this point, the SLP’s focus shifts to consideration of the expectations in the child’s classroom. The SLP will use information from observations to identify the language of the classroom communications, especially directions, texts, and instructional activities. A specific focus on morphological-syntactic constructions and vocabulary will enable the SLP to focus on specific skills the child will need for success. If multiple SLPs have children in this same classroom, this can be a joint activity.

The final step is to design intervention. Children’s academic success relies on their ability to apply the language and communication skills developed under the guidance of the SLP into real-world settings (i.e., the classroom). Therefore, the intervention should be a combination of direct intervention and collaborative classroom-based intervention. This combination of approaches allows for a specific focus on skill attainment, followed by application of that skill. The SLP may find it particularly valuable to participate in classroom center activities, working with specific children and facilitating their mastery of skills through collaboration with other students. This step relies on a collegial working relationship with the child’s classroom teacher(s), with time for planning to enable both professionals to identify which skills they will focus on and the nature of interventions.

The use of a stepwise model for analyzing the standards and applying this information to the strengths and needs of a specific child enables the SLP to tailor intervention to what matters for children—academic success. It is only through the SLP’s comprehensive knowledge of the academic standards and analysis of the specific linguistic expectations of the standards that students with language and communication difficulties can successfully meet the academic demands of 21st century schools.

About the Author 

Lissa A. Power-deFur, PhD, CCC-SLP, ASHA-F, is a professor in the communication sciences and disorders program at Longwood University in Virginia. Among the courses she teaches is public school methods, which focuses on supporting children’s mastery of the language expectations of the Common Core State Standards. In her clinical role at Longwood, she has collaborated with local school districts for service delivery. She received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in speech-language pathology at the University of Virginia. She is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Virginia, and regularly volunteers for the profession. Dr. Power-deFur has served as a state education advocacy leader and as a member of numerous education-related committees at ASHA. She is the ASHA 2014–2016 vice president of standards and ethics in speech-language pathology. Additionally, she received The ASHA Leader Outstanding Service Award for her 2011 article on special education eligibility.

 

 

Plural Authors Receive 2013 ASHA Awards

Each year, for over 70 years the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has recognized and awarded many deserving individuals for their dedication and contributions to the professions of speech-language, pathology, audiology and speech and hearing science. We would like to congratulate and highlight our authors who were honored with awards this year’s ASHA convention in Chicago.

The highest honor ASHA bestows upon its members is the Honors of the Association. Individuals recognized at this level have, “enhanced or altered the course of the professions”. We are so proud to say that Plural’s own CEO and co-founder, Dr. Sadanand Singh was recognized at this level. This year several of our authors received the Honors of the Association for their pioneering work:

  • Dr. Maurice H. Miller, NYU Steinhardt, was recognized this year for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of audiology”. Dr. Miller is Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology and was voted Professor of the Year at NYU. He is the author of Hearing Disorder Handbook, a practical, concise and time-saving text that provides comprehensive, reliable and accurate descriptions of auditory and vestibular disorders, their frequency of occurrence, etiology, diagnosis, and management – all in a single resource.
  • Dr. Robert J. Shprintzen, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, was recognized for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Shprintzen is a found member of the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc. and is a professor and director of several programs at New York Upstate Medical University. He is the author of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, volumes I and II. This comprehensive two-volume set combines text and video demonstrating the clinical features, communication phenotype and the natural history of speech and language of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS).
  • Dr. Cynthia K. Thompson, Northwestern University, was recognized this year for her “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Thompson is a professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology. She is also an ASHA fellow and recipient of the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern. She is the author of Aphasia Rehabilitation, a unique text that specifically contrasts impairment- and consequences- focused treatment with the aim of providing clinicians with a level playing field that permits them to evaluate for themselves the relative contributions that each approach provides.

The ASHA Committee on Honors awards the Fellowship of the Association to individuals who have “made outstanding contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders”. This year many of our authors were bestowed this honor:

  • Dr. Maria Adelaida Restrepo, Arizona State University, was recognized for her teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Restrpo is an Associate Professor and director of the Bilingual Language and Literacy Laboratory at ASU. She is a certified member of ASHA and author of Improving the Vocabulary and Oral Language Skills of Bilingual Latino Preschoolers.
  • Dr. Ronald C. Scherer, Bowling Green State University, was recognized for his teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Scherer is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Bowling Green State University. He is the author of Speaking and Singing on Stage.
  • Dr. Rahul Shrivstav, Michigan State University, was recognized for his administrative service, research and publications and service to state associations. He is the chair of Michigan State University’s department of communicative sciences and disorders. He has served as an Associate Editor for many scientific journals and is one of our consulting editors.
  • Dr. Anne van Kleeck, University of Texas at Dallas, was recognized for her teaching, administrative service and research and publications. She is professor and Callier Research Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of Sharing Books and Stories to Promote Language and Literacy.
  • Dr. Barbara Derickson Weinrich, Miami University, was recognized for her clinical service, teaching and research and publications. She is a professor at Miami University and Research Associate for the Cincinnait Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She is the author of Vocal Hygiene as well as the forthcoming text, Pediatric Voice.
  • Dr. Edwin M.L. Yiu, University of Hong Kong, was recognized for his teaching, administrative service and research and publications. He is a professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, He is the founder of the Voice Research Laboratory and holds and Honorary Professorship at the University of Sydney. He is also the author of Handbook of Voice Assessments.

The Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in International Achievement recognizes “distinguished achievements and significant contributions in the areas of communication disorders revealing great international impact from their work”. This year Plural author, Dr. Brooke Hallowell, Ohio University, received this award. Dr. Hallowell is the president of the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is the author of two forthcoming Plural books.

The Certificate of Recognition for Special contributions in Multicultural Affairs recognizes “recent distinguished achievement and contributions by ASHA members in the area of multicultural professional education and research, and clinical service to multicultural population”. This year Plural author, Dr. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, California State University Sacramento, received this award. Dr. Rosberry-McKibbin is a professor of speech pathology and audiology and is an ASHA Fellow. She is the author of Increasing Language Skills of Students from Low-Income Backgrounds.

Plural author, Dr. Audrey L. Holland, University of Arizona, was awarded the 2013 Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award in honor of her “exemplary contributions to science and practice”. Dr. Holland is a core member of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasisa movement and Regents’ Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the University of Arizona. She is the co-author of Counseling in Communication Disorders, now in its second edition.

Every year the editors and associate editors of ASHA journals “select an article they feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact”. This year Plural author, Dr. Lorraine O. Ramig’s article “Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Parkinson Disease” published in volume 21 of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, was chosen to receive an Editors’ Award this year.

Congratulations to all the ASHA awardees and special thanks to the great work produced by our award-winning authors!

Must-see TV – Audiology is a hot topic this week

Authors_in_the_News

Recently a few of our authors have been on television! They are experts in the field of audiology and we are happy to share their wisdom and success.

Ruth Bentler, PhD was on Charlie Rose’s Brain Series speaking about the brain and hearing. Specifically she detailed some of the history of the hearing aid and the future of hearing loss awareness and acceptance. Just want to see Ruth? Skip to the 20 minute mark.

Brian Taylor, AUD was interviewed on hearing health by Morgan Fairchild for the new show Baby Boomers in America on the LifeTime Network. He discusses the importance of early detection and maintained audiologic care.

Plural Author in the News: Blake Wilson Awarded Lasker Prize

Authors_in_the_NewsOn September 9th of this year, Plural author Dr. Blake Wilson was awarded the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medicine Research Award for his pioneering efforts in cochlear implantation, along with Graeme Clark and Ingeborg Hochmair. Dr. Wilson was chosen to receive the award because he, “oversaw a giant leap forward in speech encoding for implants that ingeniously manipulated the timing and place of stimulation so as to minimize distortion and channel interaction.” 1

Blake WilsonHe is the Co-Director for the Duke Hearing Center and an adjunct professor for the university. He also is Chief Strategy Advisor for MED-EL Medical Electronics GmbH of Innsbruck, Austria and a Senior Fellow Emeritus of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in the Research Triangle Park, NC. He has been involved in the development of the cochlear implant (CI) for the past three decades and is the inventor of many of the signal processing strategies used with the present-day devices. His book Better Hearing with Cochlear Implants: Studies at Research Triangle Institute describes his and Dr. Michael Dorman’s research in more depth.

Current cochlear implants still have limitations in delivering speech signals but are able to distinguish speech in loud noise areas, as well as identify a speaker’s gender. Dr. Wilson and the other awardees contributions to the field have given 300,000 implant recipients the gift of hearing.

1. O’Donoghue, G. Cochlear Implants — Science, Serendipity, and Success. The New England Journal of Medicine, Sept. 9, 2013, doi: 10.1056/NEJMp1310111

 

A Tribute to Plural Author Garyth Nair, MA

A TRIBUTE TO PLURAL AUTHOR GARYTH NAIR, MD

Garyth NairPlural has lost a dear friend and author. Dr. Garyth Nair passed away on August 10th, 2013 following a stroke. He was 69 years old and is survived by his wife Angelika Nair, a mezzo-soprano and his brother Ron Nair.

Dr. Nair began his vocal and conducting studies at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ where he was appointed Assistant Conductor of the famed Westminster Choir- the first student in the College’s history to be so honored. He later studied at Tanglewood with the late Sir Adrian Boult and completed an MA in Musicology at New York University. He was the former Conductor/Music Director of the Chamber Symphony of New Jersey and former Assistant Conductor of the New Jersey Symphony and the senior division of the Lakeland Youth Symphony.

At the time of his death, he was Professor of Music at Drew University in Madison, NJ where he conducted the Chorale, the Orchestra and was also Director of Vocal Activities. His love of music drove him to teach and research the human singing voice for over 25 years. In addition to his work at Drew University, Dr. Nair was also a well known conductor for one New Jersey’s premiere choruses, the Summit Chorale.

The Craft of Singing

Plural’s CEO and co-founder, Angie Singh says of Garyth Nair: “His manuscript was one
of the first we received at our home even before we decided to start a publishing company in 2004. He believed in us so much.” We were honored to call him part of our Plural family and have him among our roster of authors. Our most heartfelt condolences go out to his wife Angelika and brother Ron. He will be missed not only by his family and friends, but also by his colleagues and students.

Dr. Nair’s obituary published yesterday in the New York Times, as well as on The Voice Foundation’s website.  His funeral will be held tomorrow morning in his hometown of Chatman, NJ. Donations in his honor can be contributed to The Voice Foundation here.

Plural Author in the News: Susan G. Allen

Plural Authors in the News

Plural author Susan G. Allen was recently invited by A.G. Bell to write an article with colleague Shefali Shah about their collaboration on 101 Frequently Asked Questions About Auditory-Verbal Practice. Together they answered question #49: Why is diagnostic work important in auditory-verbal therapy and education? In this article, Perspectives on the Profession: Susan G. Allen and Shefali Shah, they share their experience and knowledge regarding children with hearing loss.

Throughout her professional career Susan G. Allen has found that parents of children with hearing loss often lose their spontaneity with their child because they believe their child will no longer be able to have a normal life. She counsels that it is extremely important for parents to receive professional counseling to help them determine goals for their child, watch as they are accomplished, and thus alleviate their fears.

Circle of Listening

In this article she elaborates on the “Circle of Listening” Method and Hierarchy of Auditory Skills, which will be published in From Assessment to Intervention: A Guidebook for the Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired-Revised. The circle of listening is a process to assist in learning. “Using the circle, the child is more likely to comprehend AND store it in his/her memory bank for later retrieval by pairing the unknown with the known to generalize the information successfully.”

She also provides examples of how she balances formal and informal assessments to measure children’s progression. She stresses that both informal and formal measurements are critical in monitoring a child’s progress and achievement of goals. The Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired (APT/HI) allows for specific analysis of the individual’s ability to decode phonemes in isolation and in the context of words and sentences. APT/HI was developed by Susan G. Allen and is available on our website. She finds that formal speech perception tests works well to measure functional speech perception skills when combined with an informal listening skills checklist. “The ultimate goal is for the child to make appropriate progress and to reach performance at and above his/her chronological age so that he/she can be mainstreamed alongside their peers with typical hearing successfully.”

Susan G. AllenAbout the Author:

Susan G. Allen is co-author of the original APT/HI and the founder and director of the Clarke Jacksonville Auditory/Oral Center, one of five campuses of the CLARKE School for Deaf / Center for Oral Education. A speech-language pathologist and teacher of the deaf for over 40 years, Allen earned an undergraduate degree in education from the University of Michigan, a master’s degree in education of the deaf from Smith College and a master’s degree in special education with an emphasis on speech pathology from the University of North Florida. She has taught at universities, mentored staff and interns and presented over 80 papers, workshops and courses on teaching children with hearing loss and on the development of speech perception and speech production. At Clarke Jacksonville, Allen strives to provide children who are deaf or hard of hearing with the English language skills they need to succeed with their hearing peers in mainstream schools. She developed the APT/HI-R to assist interventionists in assessing and managing learning-to-listen skills for improving speech intelligibility and oral language which is published by Plural Publishing, Inc.

About the text:

From Assessment to Intervention: A Guidebook for the Auditory Perception Test for the Hearing Impaired-Revised is one of our most exciting upcoming texts. This guidebook clearly describes step-by-step processes for developing specific goals in audition, speech, and language for children who have completed the assessment. Numerous case studies are used to illustrate this process at various ages and levels of auditory functioning and speech/language development. Included is a DVD that is comprised of a learning module that includes PowerPoint slides and video clips of children with hearing loss being evaluated with the APT-HI-R. Intervention techniques also are demonstrated in the video clips. Practitioners working directly with children with hearing loss will find the DVD, Guidebook, and test (APT-HI-R) to be a tremendous resource, regardless of their employment setting.

 

References:

Allen, Susan G. & Shah, Shefali (2013). Perspectives on the Profession: Susan G. Allen and Shefali Shah. [Web blog post] Retrieved May 1, 2013 from http://www.listeningandspokenlanguage.org/Document.aspx?id=1849

Perigoe, C., Allen, S. G., & Dodson, C. (2012). Why is diagnostic work important in auditory-verbal therapy and education? In W. Estabrooks, 101 Frequently Asked Questions About Auditory-Verbal Practice, 382-387. Washington, D.C.:  Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.