Plural Authors Receive 2013 ASHA Awards

Each year, for over 70 years the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has recognized and awarded many deserving individuals for their dedication and contributions to the professions of speech-language, pathology, audiology and speech and hearing science. We would like to congratulate and highlight our authors who were honored with awards this year’s ASHA convention in Chicago.

The highest honor ASHA bestows upon its members is the Honors of the Association. Individuals recognized at this level have, “enhanced or altered the course of the professions”. We are so proud to say that Plural’s own CEO and co-founder, Dr. Sadanand Singh was recognized at this level. This year several of our authors received the Honors of the Association for their pioneering work:

  • Dr. Maurice H. Miller, NYU Steinhardt, was recognized this year for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of audiology”. Dr. Miller is Professor Emeritus of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology and was voted Professor of the Year at NYU. He is the author of Hearing Disorder Handbook, a practical, concise and time-saving text that provides comprehensive, reliable and accurate descriptions of auditory and vestibular disorders, their frequency of occurrence, etiology, diagnosis, and management – all in a single resource.
  • Dr. Robert J. Shprintzen, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, was recognized for his “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Shprintzen is a found member of the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome Educational Foundation, Inc. and is a professor and director of several programs at New York Upstate Medical University. He is the author of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, volumes I and II. This comprehensive two-volume set combines text and video demonstrating the clinical features, communication phenotype and the natural history of speech and language of Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS).
  • Dr. Cynthia K. Thompson, Northwestern University, was recognized this year for her “distinguished contributions to the profession of communication sciences and disorders”. Dr. Thompson is a professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Neurology. She is also an ASHA fellow and recipient of the Walder Award for Research Excellence at Northwestern. She is the author of Aphasia Rehabilitation, a unique text that specifically contrasts impairment- and consequences- focused treatment with the aim of providing clinicians with a level playing field that permits them to evaluate for themselves the relative contributions that each approach provides.

The ASHA Committee on Honors awards the Fellowship of the Association to individuals who have “made outstanding contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders”. This year many of our authors were bestowed this honor:

  • Dr. Maria Adelaida Restrepo, Arizona State University, was recognized for her teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Restrpo is an Associate Professor and director of the Bilingual Language and Literacy Laboratory at ASU. She is a certified member of ASHA and author of Improving the Vocabulary and Oral Language Skills of Bilingual Latino Preschoolers.
  • Dr. Ronald C. Scherer, Bowling Green State University, was recognized for his teaching, research and publications and service to state associations. Dr. Scherer is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Bowling Green State University. He is the author of Speaking and Singing on Stage.
  • Dr. Rahul Shrivstav, Michigan State University, was recognized for his administrative service, research and publications and service to state associations. He is the chair of Michigan State University’s department of communicative sciences and disorders. He has served as an Associate Editor for many scientific journals and is one of our consulting editors.
  • Dr. Anne van Kleeck, University of Texas at Dallas, was recognized for her teaching, administrative service and research and publications. She is professor and Callier Research Scholar at the Callier Center for Communication Disorders at the University of Texas at Dallas. She is the author of Sharing Books and Stories to Promote Language and Literacy.
  • Dr. Barbara Derickson Weinrich, Miami University, was recognized for her clinical service, teaching and research and publications. She is a professor at Miami University and Research Associate for the Cincinnait Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She is the author of Vocal Hygiene as well as the forthcoming text, Pediatric Voice.
  • Dr. Edwin M.L. Yiu, University of Hong Kong, was recognized for his teaching, administrative service and research and publications. He is a professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong, He is the founder of the Voice Research Laboratory and holds and Honorary Professorship at the University of Sydney. He is also the author of Handbook of Voice Assessments.

The Certificate of Recognition for Outstanding Contributions in International Achievement recognizes “distinguished achievements and significant contributions in the areas of communication disorders revealing great international impact from their work”. This year Plural author, Dr. Brooke Hallowell, Ohio University, received this award. Dr. Hallowell is the president of the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is the author of two forthcoming Plural books.

The Certificate of Recognition for Special contributions in Multicultural Affairs recognizes “recent distinguished achievement and contributions by ASHA members in the area of multicultural professional education and research, and clinical service to multicultural population”. This year Plural author, Dr. Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, California State University Sacramento, received this award. Dr. Rosberry-McKibbin is a professor of speech pathology and audiology and is an ASHA Fellow. She is the author of Increasing Language Skills of Students from Low-Income Backgrounds.

Plural author, Dr. Audrey L. Holland, University of Arizona, was awarded the 2013 Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award in honor of her “exemplary contributions to science and practice”. Dr. Holland is a core member of the Life Participation Approach to Aphasisa movement and Regents’ Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the University of Arizona. She is the co-author of Counseling in Communication Disorders, now in its second edition.

Every year the editors and associate editors of ASHA journals “select an article they feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation and impact”. This year Plural author, Dr. Lorraine O. Ramig’s article “Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Parkinson Disease” published in volume 21 of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, was chosen to receive an Editors’ Award this year.

Congratulations to all the ASHA awardees and special thanks to the great work produced by our award-winning authors!

Plural Authors- How to Make Your Book More Promotable

Hello Plural Authors,

This post is for you! Brian Feinblum, creator and author of BookMarketingBuzzBlog and Chief Marketing Officer for Media Connect, recently invited us to share one of his blog posts, Making Your Book More Promotable. We felt that much of it would be informative for you wherever you may be in the book-creation process and so condensed and edited it with you in mind.

We are always here to help you!

-Plural Team

Making Your Book More Promotable 

Write Your Next Book with The Media in Mind

bookThe world of book publishing has changed immensely over the past decade –and certainly over the past three years, thanks to Amazon, Apple, tablets, e-books, Borders, and social media.

The role of book publicity has not changed though the methods have been altered. PR is needed to give a book a chance at succeeding in an overcrowded marketplace and a noisy media landscape. With more books being published than ever before, and more media outlets, there is a lot of competition.

Technology has no doubt impacted many industries including publishing. As a result, readers and consumers have been changed as well. Writers are changing, too. They have become writers and promoters.

There is no way of getting around it. To embrace PR as an author is to embrace your future.  The good news is there is plenty that you can do to promote your book:

collaboration

  • Think like the media and about their needs
  • Change your attitude about your PR role
  • Brand beyond the book – brand yourself
  • Network
  • Partner with other authors

Lots of authors have hang-ups about publicity. They often feel that they aren’t “mainstream” enough to be promotable or are too shy and uncomfortable to promote their book. You need to take ownership of your book and that means quarterbacking your PR campaign.

Give yourself a “PR audit” to see where you can begin:

  1.  Think of the connections you have and the people you know – do you have connections who could “hook you up” or can you drop names to the media?
  2. What is in your book that the media will find interesting?

Next think seriously about what it is you want to accomplish through publicity. Do you want to build your career, establish a voice, sell your book, influence others, get a job out of it? Knowing what your end goal is from PR will help you decide how to go about getting there. Not knowing why you are doing publicity won’t get you anywhere positive. Always keep an eye towards the future. In deciding what your goal is, consider realistically how much time and energy you will actually have to dedicate towards promoting your book. This will help you determine what publicity goal is attainable and feasible given your busy life.

The most promotable books, of any genre, are:

  • Unique in how they tackle a well-known subject
  • Reveal news or raise great questions
  • Lend personal insight on an industry, person, or organization

What’s Today’s Media Landscape?

In today’s media landscape there are more outlets and opportunities, their value is also more diluted than ever before. You will need a certain quantity of quality media placements

PR is not just about giving away free downloads of chapters and books, or of tweeting and making videos, or of e-blasting a press release. It is about making a sustained, strategic effort to influence the influencers and get media coverage that will help you in the short and long-term.

pen&paperYour writing can help you get media coverage and how you talk about what you wrote matters. Are you an expert in the field? If so, sound like it. Find a way to summarize without the details. Get to the heart of why someone should read your book. You should formulate your 15-second elevator speech about your book before it is written. Express it in a way that serves a need, fulfills a desire or feeds a want.

If this sounds like a lot to take in, it is; but don’t worry. Planning and practice makes perfect. Here are some tricks that can help get media recognition:

  • Socialize or “regionalize” the book
  • Get early reviews & build “buzz”
  • Ask for specific favors from those you know
  • Exploit personal experience/standing
  • Use PR as a means to an end- remember your end goal
  • Coincide your media pitches and efforts with upcoming events, holidays, anniversaries, honorary days, and timely news hooks
  • Create a website at least 5-6 months prior to your book launch date
  • See your launch date as a coronation – not Day 1. From your launch date, you have 30-90 days to make an impression.

Green Apple on BooksRemember to focus on your goal and keep an eye on the future. Plan ahead and begin your PR campaign before the book publishes. The last thing you want is a huge stack of inventory with no one interested. Keep your audience excited by doing daily publicity- even if it is just a simple tweet. Always meet your deadlines so everything comes in on schedule with no unexpected surprises. Test your ideas out on other people to get feedback. If at first you don’t succeed, try again.

There is nothing more rewarding having written a great book than to have a lot of readers and media attention. By actively promoting your work you position yourself to break through the clutter and heard successfully.

Advice for Audiology Students from Plural Authors

graduationGraduation can be an exciting and yet terrifying time. What do you do now that you’ve graduated and completed all your hard studies? Many turn to advice from those who are more experienced to aid them in making a decision.

We were fortunate to sit down with several of our authors in the field of audiology at the AudiologyNOW! meeting this past April. We asked these seasoned experts what advice they would give to students or anyone starting out in the communication disorders professions. Their responses were heartfelt, candid, a little irreverent, but definitely reveal a deep love for their profession.

Some of their advice-

  • Consider going into private practice
  • Get an MBA/other higher degree
  • Be true to yourself; do what you want to do and do it well
  • Continue learning about the industry/technology
  • Communicate with patients better than your peers

We hope you enjoy!