Guest Blog Post- The Frontal Lobe: Front and Center

The Frontal Lobe: Front and Center by Jennifer Hatfield, MHS, CCC-SLP

frontal_lobe

How often have you touched your forehead and told yourself to “pay attention” or “think, think, think?”

Also known as the cerebral cortex, the frontal lobe consists of a right and left lobe, located directly behind the forehead, that have the ability to solve problems by allowing us to think flexibly and express language. It also is responsible for our memory, monitoring our impulses and allowing us to get started by initiating activity. These skills, referred to as executive function skills, are what we know to be the process of “thinking.” We can see then, that the practice of touching one’s forehead, while not a sound technique for improving thinking skills, is based in some truth. Continue reading

Featured Article: One New Year’s Resolution to Keep

One New Year’s resolution to keep – learn more about being an effective speech-language pathology assistant (SLPA) supervisor

by Plural author Jennifer Ostergren

If you are like me, as 2014 swings into full gear, you look to your newly inked New Year’s resolutions. One resolution on my list this year is to expand my knowledge and skills as an educator and supervisor of speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs). Those of you with similar aspirations know that serving as an SLPA supervisor can be highly rewarding, but also challenging, especially given a lack of resources and tools specific to SLPAs. This year, however, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) continues to expand its efforts in this area, with new programs, policies, and resources specific to SLPAs and their supervisors. In particular, ASHA’s new Practice Portal on the topic of SLPAs, located at http://www.asha.org/Practice-Portal/Professional-Issues/Speech-Language-Pathology-Assistants/, is an excellent source of current information and resources on this topic. The sections that follow also highlight several key resources from ASHA that may be of help as well. Continue reading

Guest Blog Post – What’s in a CEU?

by Mary Huston, MS, CCC-SLP

One of the fabulous things about the profession of speech-language pathology is that we are expected to constantly learn. There is always new research being discussed, new ideas to practice, new breakthroughs for therapy, and sadly, new paperwork requirements. Most state licensures require a certain amount of continuing education hours every year or two and ASHA requires a certain amount over three years. Thankfully, we can usually double-dip and count the same CEUs for both state licensure and ASHA. However, in today’s busy schedule of high caseloads and insane paperwork, no one has time to sit through yet another conference that doesn’t pertain to our work.

bored_meetingAfter discussions on social media, it has come to my attention that not everyone realizes there are alternatives to sitting in a conference room just to get the CEUs. Don’t misunderstand me – I’m all for conferences. There is a lot to be said about the camaraderie of sitting in a room of similar professionals. However, as wonderful as that camaraderie is, if the subject matter doesn’t pertain to your job, or interest you, is it truly time well-spent? Thankfully there are many alternative ways to gain professional development and continuing education credits. Thankfully there are many alternative ways to gain professional development and continuing education credits. Continue reading