Lesson Plans — An SLPA’s foundation for an effective therapy session. Now that I have one, how do I implement it?

Jacqueline_BrylaKraemer_CWSLPA

By Jacqueline Bryla, co-author of Clinical Workbook for Speech-Language Pathology Assistants

Responsibilities of a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant are many and can vary.  One key component within the scope of practice for a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLPA) is to follow documented treatment plans or protocols developed by the supervising Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP). For a new SLPA this can be tricky and requires some experience in order to provide an effective therapy session for their clients and students.

Presenting a Lesson Plan

A guideline will make your clients and students aware of what they will be learning or practicing during the therapy session in addition to keeping them engaged and on task. An SLPA can share the lesson or treatment plan by telling their clients or students what they will be learning.  Providing a visual schedule by outlining the therapy tasks on a tabletop white board (i.e., warm-up; 5 minutes, articulation practice; 15 minutes, homework/carryover assignment, reward) can also be very effective for providing expectations of the therapy session time. Adding icons or photos to illustrate the task can be helpful for those who are not yet readers. Depending on the goals and objectives for the students, an SLPA might spend a portion of therapy time working on an articulation goal (i.e., medial /s/ in sentences) and the rest of the session on a specific language goal (i.e., concepts).  Considering how to incorporate multiple student goals or objectives within a therapy session will come with quality guidance from the supervising SLP as well as practice and experience. Providing a clear agenda for your clients and students at the beginning of the therapy session will be extremely helpful for you and your students to stay on task.

Engagement

When appropriate, offering choices for student and clients can set the stage for a productive therapy session. Allow your students to choose to work on one sound before another (i.e., /s/ or /l/), or to choose a board game or token piece that might be used during the session (i.e., Candyland, Snail’s Pace Race, red or blue token) or to use an articulation card deck or an app (i.e., Little Bee Speech Articulation Station, Smarty Ears Articulate It). Knowing and understanding your students’ interests will aide in keeping them engaged during the therapy session. Some students thrive on verbal positive feedback (i.e., you’re doing great, that was an awesome try), others will likely stay engaged by being allowed to have a little control by choosing the activity and yet others will need some additional motivation by earning a short timed reward at the end of the session or during the session (i.e., using a fidget, receiving a sticker or stamp). Seeking guidance from, in addition to observing, your supervising SLP provide treatment sessions can be helpful in this area.

Tool Box and Resource Efficiency

Become familiar with the materials available to you for therapy. Is there a closet full of games and therapy items at your disposal (i.e., an iPad with apps, articulation card decks, language or pragmatic resources)? Taking time to read the game directions and instructions of use or viewing an app tutorial prior to the therapy time will allow for a more efficient therapy session by allowing an SLPA to instruct their students and clients from the start. Being prepared and familiarizing yourself with materials reduces the opportunities for clients and students to veer off task. Always keep in mind that an SLPA must perform only those tasks assigned by the supervising SLP. Many therapy sessions are only 30 minutes, to provide a quality session for clients and students preparation is of the utmost importance.

Conclusion

There is no one way to describe or predict each therapy session scenario. A lesson plan may not work as well as you expected or go as planned. Do not get discouraged; this is an opportunity for you to learn what may work and what may not work. Being prepared and following your supervising SLPs guidelines will allow you to have the most productive therapy session, one that allows your students to work toward their goals and objectives.