Healing Voices

Healing Voices (1)By Leda Scearce, MM, MS, CCC-SLP author of Manual of Singing Voice Rehabilitation: A Practical Approach to Vocal Health and Wellness

Singing is a part of virtually every culture and is fundamental to our human experience. In the United States, singing is enormously popular, as evidenced by the vast number of people engaged in all kinds of singing activities. Over 30 million Americans participate in choral singing alone (Chorus America, 2009). Shows such as The Voice, America’s Got Talent, and American Idol illustrate how passionate we are about singing. From the amateur recreational singer to the elite celebrity, we sing as soloists and in ensembles, with instruments and a cappella, in classical and contemporary styles, on stage, in concert, and in the shower.

Every person’s voice is unique and identifiable, and our voices can be a big part of our identity and how we see ourselves in the world. This is especially true for singers, for whom the voice is not only intricately tied to self-image and self-esteem but also may be a source of income and livelihood, creative expression, spiritual engagement, and quality of life. For a singer, a voice injury represents a crisis. Because of the specialized needs of singers, it takes a team—including a laryngologist, speech-language pathologist, and singing voice rehabilitation specialist—to get a singer back on track following an injury or voice disorder. Singing voice rehabilitation is a hybrid profession, requiring in-depth clinical and scientific knowledge married with excellence in teaching singing.

Voice problems are rarely isolated in etiology—usually multiple factors converge to create an injury. These factors may include poor vocal hygiene, inadequate vocal technique, an imbalance in vocal load and medical problems (allergies and reflux are common in singers, but thyroid, pulmonary, neurologic, and rheumatologic conditions are among the illnesses that may affect the voice). The singing voice rehabilitation process must encompass all elements that may be contributing to the problem: medical factors, vocal hygiene, vocal coordination and conditioning, vocal pacing, and emotional factors. Continue reading

How to Work with Interpreters and Translators

Henriette_Langdon  Langdon_WWIT  Terry_Saenz

By Henriette W. Langdon, Ed.D., FCCC-SLP and Terry I. Saenz, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, authors of Working with Interpreters and Translators: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists

Our world is increasingly heterogeneous. English is no longer the only language spoken in the United States, England, or Australia. French is not the only main language spoken in France and neither is German the only language spoken in Germany. Immigration caused by political and economical changes has dispersed many people to other countries in the world in search of better opportunities. Consequently, communication between these individuals and residents of the different countries is often disrupted due to the lack of a common language. This challenge has existed throughout humankind, but it seems that it has increased in the last century or so. There have always been people who knew two languages that needed bridging, but now this urgency is more pronounced. The need for professionally trained interpreters was first noted following the end of WWI when the Unites States was first involved in world peace talks alongside many nations with representatives who all spoke a variety of languages. This historical event eventually led the League of Nations to the foundation of the École d’Intèrpretes in Geneva, Switzerland in 1924. Since that time, many other schools that train bilingual interpreters to participate in international conferences have been established. The AIIC [Association Internationale des Interprètes de Conférence (International Association of Conference Interpreters)] Interpreting Schools directory lists a total of 87 schools worldwide: http://aiic.net/directories/schools/georegions. The reader can gather information on which specific language pairs are emphasized in the various training schools; for example, Arabic-English; French-Spanish, Chinese-English, and so forth. Thus, interpreting for international conferences is a well-established profession today, offering specific training and certificates. However, interpreting is necessary not only for international conferences, but also to assist in bridging the communication in everyday contexts such as medical or health, judicial, educational (schools) and the community at large. Training and certification in areas such as medical and judicial have slowly emerged and are available to those who need them in various states throughout the United States. Legislation has been the primary force in the establishment of certificates in the areas of medical and legal interpreting. However, training in other areas where interpreting is needed such as education, and our professions, speech pathology and audiology, are notoriously lacking. There are some situations where medical interpreters can assist speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists in a hospital or rehabilitation center, but even those interpreters may not have the specific terminology and practice or procedures to work effectively with our professionals. Working with Interpreters and Translators: A Guide for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists is a second revised and expanded edition on this topic that provides SLPs, audiologists, and interpreters who collaborate with them some concrete tools and strategies on how best to conduct interviews, conferences, and assessments when the client and/or family does not speak English fluently.  The proposed process is based on information gathered from other interpreting professions. The research, and some personal interviews with audiologists in particular that were conducted to assemble this information, indicate that the process is conducted haphazardly at best.  The literature available on the collaboration between SLPs and interpreters indicates that both parties are not secure about procedure and must learn how to work together by trial and error. Often the SLP does not trust the interpreter and the interpreter does not follow suggested procedures, such as failing to interpret all that is being said, conducting a side conversation with a parent during a meeting, and giving the child unnecessary cuing during testing (if tests are available in the child’s language, which is primarily Spanish). Literature on working effectively with audiologists is almost nonexistent; therefore, the first author resorted to several personal interviews with audiologists, a specialist of the deaf and hard of hearing, and professors of audiology throughout the country. Often individuals who perform the duties and responsibilities of the interpreter and who are hired to do this job are not fully bilingual; they may speak the two languages, but may not be able to read or write the language they are using to interpret. These interpreters are often not respected, are not treated as professionals, and their pay is very low.

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Invaluable Resources for Anyone Who Uses or Trains the Singing Voice

The Vocal Athlete

The Vocal Athlete by Wendy LeBorgne and Marci Rosenberg

The Vocal Athlete and the companion workbook The Vocal Athlete: Application and Technique for the Hybrid Singer are written and designed to bridge the gap between the art of contemporary commercial music (CCM) singing and the science behind voice production in this ever-growing popular vocal style. These books are a must have for the speech pathologist, singing voice specialist, and vocal pedagogue. Continue reading

Plural Authors- How to Make Your Book More Promotable

Hello Plural Authors,

This post is for you! Brian Feinblum, creator and author of BookMarketingBuzzBlog and Chief Marketing Officer for Media Connect, recently invited us to share one of his blog posts, Making Your Book More Promotable. We felt that much of it would be informative for you wherever you may be in the book-creation process and so condensed and edited it with you in mind.

We are always here to help you!

-Plural Team

Making Your Book More Promotable 

Write Your Next Book with The Media in Mind

bookThe world of book publishing has changed immensely over the past decade –and certainly over the past three years, thanks to Amazon, Apple, tablets, e-books, Borders, and social media.

The role of book publicity has not changed though the methods have been altered. PR is needed to give a book a chance at succeeding in an overcrowded marketplace and a noisy media landscape. With more books being published than ever before, and more media outlets, there is a lot of competition.

Technology has no doubt impacted many industries including publishing. As a result, readers and consumers have been changed as well. Writers are changing, too. They have become writers and promoters.

There is no way of getting around it. To embrace PR as an author is to embrace your future.  The good news is there is plenty that you can do to promote your book:

collaboration

  • Think like the media and about their needs
  • Change your attitude about your PR role
  • Brand beyond the book – brand yourself
  • Network
  • Partner with other authors

Lots of authors have hang-ups about publicity. They often feel that they aren’t “mainstream” enough to be promotable or are too shy and uncomfortable to promote their book. You need to take ownership of your book and that means quarterbacking your PR campaign.

Give yourself a “PR audit” to see where you can begin:

  1.  Think of the connections you have and the people you know – do you have connections who could “hook you up” or can you drop names to the media?
  2. What is in your book that the media will find interesting?

Next think seriously about what it is you want to accomplish through publicity. Do you want to build your career, establish a voice, sell your book, influence others, get a job out of it? Knowing what your end goal is from PR will help you decide how to go about getting there. Not knowing why you are doing publicity won’t get you anywhere positive. Always keep an eye towards the future. In deciding what your goal is, consider realistically how much time and energy you will actually have to dedicate towards promoting your book. This will help you determine what publicity goal is attainable and feasible given your busy life.

The most promotable books, of any genre, are:

  • Unique in how they tackle a well-known subject
  • Reveal news or raise great questions
  • Lend personal insight on an industry, person, or organization

What’s Today’s Media Landscape?

In today’s media landscape there are more outlets and opportunities, their value is also more diluted than ever before. You will need a certain quantity of quality media placements

PR is not just about giving away free downloads of chapters and books, or of tweeting and making videos, or of e-blasting a press release. It is about making a sustained, strategic effort to influence the influencers and get media coverage that will help you in the short and long-term.

pen&paperYour writing can help you get media coverage and how you talk about what you wrote matters. Are you an expert in the field? If so, sound like it. Find a way to summarize without the details. Get to the heart of why someone should read your book. You should formulate your 15-second elevator speech about your book before it is written. Express it in a way that serves a need, fulfills a desire or feeds a want.

If this sounds like a lot to take in, it is; but don’t worry. Planning and practice makes perfect. Here are some tricks that can help get media recognition:

  • Socialize or “regionalize” the book
  • Get early reviews & build “buzz”
  • Ask for specific favors from those you know
  • Exploit personal experience/standing
  • Use PR as a means to an end- remember your end goal
  • Coincide your media pitches and efforts with upcoming events, holidays, anniversaries, honorary days, and timely news hooks
  • Create a website at least 5-6 months prior to your book launch date
  • See your launch date as a coronation – not Day 1. From your launch date, you have 30-90 days to make an impression.

Green Apple on BooksRemember to focus on your goal and keep an eye on the future. Plan ahead and begin your PR campaign before the book publishes. The last thing you want is a huge stack of inventory with no one interested. Keep your audience excited by doing daily publicity- even if it is just a simple tweet. Always meet your deadlines so everything comes in on schedule with no unexpected surprises. Test your ideas out on other people to get feedback. If at first you don’t succeed, try again.

There is nothing more rewarding having written a great book than to have a lot of readers and media attention. By actively promoting your work you position yourself to break through the clutter and heard successfully.

New Addition to Plural’s Audiology Portfolio

We are thrilled to share some exciting news with you!  Bellis’ central auditory processing text has been acquired by Plural Publishing. Offered at a new student-friendly price, you can now find the second edition of Assessment and Management of Central Auditory Processing Disorders in the Education Setting available for course review and/or purchase on our Website.

Awareness on World AIDS Day

Today is World AIDS Day.  Learn more info at: http://www.worldaidsday.org/

Also check out our recent release:

HIV/AIDS Related Communication, Hearing, and Swallowing Disorders

by De Wet Swanepoel, PhD and Brenda Louw, PhD

http://www.pluralpublishing.com/publication_harchsd.htm

Disorders in communication, hearing, or swallowing are almost universally associated with HIV/AIDS, making this book an indispensable resource for health care professionals, including physicians, nurses, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists. It combines the accumulated experience and knowledge of a multidisciplinary group of internationally recognized authors. Information is structured for easy access with concise updates on the current understanding of communication, hearing, and swallowing disorders associated with HIV/AIDS and includes clinical strategies for identification, diagnosis, and intervention across all ages. It also incorporates novel chapters on aspects such as HIV/AIDS-associated balance disorders, clinical ethics, psychosocial impact, and infection control, making it the complete reference and clinical resource in the field.

New Book on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Just Published!  Mild Traumatic Brain Injury:  Episodic Symptoms and Treatment discusses a diagnosable and  treatable sub-type of Persistent Post-Concussive Syndrome (PPCS) following mild Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

Clearly written, practical, and requiring little knowledge of brain structure and function, this book provides all involved in client care with the tools they need to ensure good outcomes. Of particular value is the near-unique coverage of the the mechanisms underlying blast-induced neuro-trauma, a subject of great concern to military personnel, care-providers, and their families.

Order your copy today!

Coming Soon!

Assessment of Communcation Disorders in Adult, by M. Hegde and Don Freed, contains a unique combination of scholarly reasearch, resources, and practical protocols to assess communication disorders in adults. This book offers ample scholarly research and resources, making it perfectly useful as a text book, as well as the the practical protocols that makes it useful to practicing clinicians. This is the perfect one stop source that meets every need of the classroom and clinic. We are excited for this book’s release and think you should check it out and see why!

Hot off the press!

Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech

by Margaret Fish

The first in Plural’s exciting new Here’s How Series, Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech is now available! Here’s How to Treat Childhood Apraxia of Speech empowers speech and language pathologists with a clear vision of systematic treatment approaches to achieve positive outcomes for children with apraxia of speech.

Click here to order your copy today!

Communication Development and Disorders for Partners in Service

by Cheryl D. Gunter and Mareile A. Koenig

Communication Development and Disorders for Partners in Service offers as an introduction to topics related to typical and atypical language development that is considered most important to those with the potential to participate in the clinical service provision continuum.

Click here to order your copy today!