Blog

By Ken Bleile, PhD
October 16, 2020
Familiar social routines play a central role in helping a young child figure out the meaning of words (Bruner, 1983; Conboy & Kuhl, 2011; Meltzoff, Kuhl, Movelian, & Sejnowski, 2009; Snow & Goldfield, 1983). The following analogy (hopefully!) gives some…
By Ken Bleile, PhD
September 18, 2020
Because an infant cannot know beforehand which language they must learn, a child is born able to learn any language. This means, for example, that an infant who grows up learning English also can learn approximately 7,099 other languages…
By Ken Bleile, PhD
August 14, 2020
Speech is complex and requires many years for a child to learn. It begins months before a baby is born, when they lie curled in the womb listening to mother’s voice, and it continues throughout life. It is convenient to divide this long time into four…
By Jaimie L. Gilbert, PhD and Ken Bleile, PhD
July 17, 2020
Speech reception entails sound traveling via air, bone and tissue, fluid, and electricity. Where speech reception ends, speech perception begins, turning electrical impulses into meaningful speech and communication. An end goal of speech sound production…
By Todd A. Bohnenkamp, PhD and Ken Bleile, PhD
June 19, 2020
Phonetic placement and shaping sometimes is confused with nonspeech oral-motor exercises (NSOMEs). Phonetic placement and shaping rely on phonetic knowledge to convert a nonstimulable sound into a stimulable one. Stated simply: The techniques place and…