Music and Hearing Aids: A Clinical Approach

First Edition

Marshall Chasin

Details: 146 pages, B&W, Softcover, 6" x 9"

ISBN13: 978-1-63550-395-1

© 2022 | Available

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Price: $89.95

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Music and Hearing Aids: A Clinical Approach is written for hearing health care professionals working with hard-of-hearing musicians and music lovers. This highly relevant book breaks down the research for how music can, and should, be processed through modern hearing aids and offers the busy audiologist clinically based strategies to optimize the sound of amplified music for hard-of-hearing people. 

With an easy-to-read style, this text meets audiologists where they are by providing a primer on wavelength acoustics, as well as walking the reader through the basics of music needed to understand the research available. in addition, this professional resource highlights gaps in the research and technology, offering a clear picture of the room for growth available in the field.

Key Features

  • A wide range of information covered in a concise text with 26 figures and 7 tables
  • Statements throughout the book of where more work still needs to be done with 12 mini-experiments that could form the basis of student research projects
  • A balanced discussion of clinical practice and research
  • A chapter on "A return to older technology?” that includes input from many musicians who wear hearing aids
  • A PluralPlus companion website with 15 audio files that serve to drive home the points presented in the text

From the Foreword by Dr. Mead C. Killion: “A major feature of this book is the extensive review of the literature. In each case, the relevance of the research findings to their implications for hearing aid design and fitting is emphasized ... A wealth of research is summarized with an eye to the clinical environment and fitting of hearing aids for listening to, and playing music.”

Foreword by Mead Killion, PhD, DSc
Preface

Reviewers

Chapter 1. A Primer on Wavelength Acoustics for Musical Instruments
Chapter 2. Music (and Speech) for the Audiologist
Chapter 3. Hearing Aids and Music: What the Literature Says
Chapter 4. Clinical Approaches to Fitting Hearing Aids for Music
Chapter 5. A Return to Older Technology?

Appendix A. Conversion Chart of Musical Notes and Their Fundamental Frequencies
Appendix B. Research Projects That Would Contribute Significantly to Clinical Knowledge

Appendix C. 15 Audio File Descriptions

Index


Audio Files:

  • Audio file of a French horn brass instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • Audio file of a clarinet woodwind instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • Audio file of a violin stringed instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • The deleterious effects of decreasing the peak input limiting level from inputs of 115 dB SPL, to 105 dB SPL, to 95 dB SPL, and back to 115 dB SPL for music in an A-B-C-A format.
  • The minimal effect of decreasing the peak input limiting level from inputs of 115 dB SPL, to 105 dB SPL, to 95 dB SPL, 90 dB SPL, and back to 115 dB SPL for speech in an A-B-C-D-A format.
  • (A) Undistorted 1000 Hz pure tone and (B) a front end clipped pure tone creating a square wave with odd numbered multiples 1000 Hz, in an A-B-A format.
  • In an A-B-A format, an orchestral piece of music has no frequency lowering (A) and linear frequency lowering (B) applied to it but by only ½ of one semitone above 1500 Hz.
  • In an A-B-A format, speech has no frequency lowering (A) and linear frequency lowering (B) applied to it but by only ½ of one semitone above 1500 Hz.
  • In an A-B-A format, music has (A) no modification to its spectrum and (B) a high frequency decrease of sound (-6dB/oct above 1500 Hz). This technique would be equally acceptable for both speech and for music.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original violin music, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered music (B) creating a perfect fifth. A perfect fifth will always be created with one half wavelength resonator instruments such as the violin and will never be dissonant.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original clarinet music, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered music (B) creating a third. A third will always be created with one quarter wavelength resonator instruments such as the clarinet and will never be dissonant.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original speech, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered speech (B) which is almost unintelligible.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) flute, followed by (B) a “modified flute sound” where the higher frequency harmonics have been increased in amplitude, making it sound more like an oboe.
  • Music is given in an A-B-C-D-A format, where A is a flat spectrum, and B, C, and D have peaks of 5 dB, 10 dB, and 15 dB respectively. There is one peak for each octave above 1000 Hz.
  • Speech is given in an A-B-C-D-A format, where A is a flat spectrum, and B, C, and D have peaks of 5 dB, 10 dB, and 15 dB respectively. There is one peak for each octave above 1000 Hz.

Marshall Chasin

Marshall Chasin, AuD, MSc, is Director of Audiology and research at the Musicians’ Clinics of Canada, Adjunct professor at the University of Toronto (in linguistics), and Associate professor in the School of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Western University. Dr. Chasin holds a BSc in Mathematics and linguistics from the University of Toronto, a MSc in Audiology and Speech Sciences from the University of British Columbia, and his AuD from the Arizona School of health Sciences. He is the author of over 200 articles and 8 books including Musicians and the Prevention of Hearing Loss.  he writes a monthly column in hearing review called Back to Basics.  Marshall has been the recipient of many awards over the years including the 2004 Audiology Foundation of America professional leadership Award, the 2012 Queen Elizabeth ii Silver Jubilee Award, the 2013 Jos Millar Shield award from the British Society of Audiology, and the 2017 Canada 150 Medal. He has developed a TTS app called Temporary hearing loss Test app.

Learn More

Purchase of Music and Hearing Aids: A Clinical Approach comes with access to 15 audio files on a PluralPlus companion website

To access the audio files, you must register the access code printed on the inside front cover of your book. 

*Note: If you have purchased this book used or have rented it, your access code will not work if it was already redeemed by the original buyer of the book. Plural Publishing does not offer replacement access codes for used or rented books.

If you purchase the ebook, the audio files are included in the book.

 

LIST OF AUDIO FILES:

  • Audio file of a French horn brass instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • Audio file of a clarinet woodwind instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • Audio file of a violin stringed instrument playing notes either quietly (pp) or loudly (ff). The interested reader can perform their own spectral analysis of the sounds in the file.
  • The deleterious effects of decreasing the peak input limiting level from inputs of 115 dB SPL, to 105 dB SPL, to 95 dB SPL, and back to 115 dB SPL for music in an A-B-C-A format.
  • The minimal effect of decreasing the peak input limiting level from inputs of 115 dB SPL, to 105 dB SPL, to 95 dB SPL, 90 dB SPL, and back to 115 dB SPL for speech in an A-B-C-D-A format.
  • (A) Undistorted 1000 Hz pure tone and (B) a front end clipped pure tone creating a square wave with odd numbered multiples 1000 Hz, in an A-B-A format.
  • In an A-B-A format, an orchestral piece of music has no frequency lowering (A) and linear frequency lowering (B) applied to it but by only ½ of one semitone above 1500 Hz.
  • In an A-B-A format, speech has no frequency lowering (A) and linear frequency lowering (B) applied to it but by only ½ of one semitone above 1500 Hz.
  • In an A-B-A format, music has (A) no modification to its spectrum and (B) a high frequency decrease of sound (-6dB/oct above 1500 Hz). This technique would be equally acceptable for both speech and for music.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original violin music, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered music (B) creating a perfect fifth. A perfect fifth will always be created with one half wavelength resonator instruments such as the violin and will never be dissonant.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original clarinet music, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered music (B) creating a third. A third will always be created with one quarter wavelength resonator instruments such as the clarinet and will never be dissonant.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) the original speech, followed by the one octave linear frequency lowered speech (B) which is almost unintelligible.
  • In an A-B-A format, (A) flute, followed by (B) a “modified flute sound” where the higher frequency harmonics have been increased in amplitude, making it sound more like an oboe.
  • Music is given in an A-B-C-D-A format, where A is a flat spectrum, and B, C, and D have peaks of 5 dB, 10 dB, and 15 dB respectively. There is one peak for each octave above 1000 Hz.
  • Speech is given in an A-B-C-D-A format, where A is a flat spectrum, and B, C, and D have peaks of 5 dB, 10 dB, and 15 dB respectively. There is one peak for each octave above 1000 Hz.

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